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Durkin Tactical Franklin Armory
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Posted: 8/2/2017 8:19:44 PM EDT
I have some nice, super accurate, reliable, durable overbore magnum bolt action Rem 700 and Win 70 derivative rifles (.338 Lapua, .338 RUM, .300 RUM, .270 WBY, .30-378 WBY, etc.).  All have German and Austrian variable power optics, usually 30mm or 34mm tubes).  All of these rigs, I conclude, at 11-ish plus lbs. each, are just too heavy for a 150-lb fit 48 year old like me to lug up shale and sleet covered shale mountain slopes in addition to a 45-lb. wilderness-loaded backpack in search of Dall Sheep.  The bolt action rifle I'm having built will be ~ 7.5 lbs. minus scope, chambered in .270 Wby Mag.

Question:  what is the optimal rifle scope (water proof, fog proof) size/power?  I agree with Craig Boddington that a 1-inch tube should suffice for what are usually 50-200 yard shots, but occasionally 400+ yard shots.  However, the power has me flummoxed.  3-9x?  2-7x (given the potential for a mountain grizzly encounter as well?)  4.5-14x?  

I am thinking 40mm objective, and Leopold to keep costs down.  Every time I pay $3k for a Swarovski scope, I feel both proud ('cause it'll last a lifetime and they're bad ass) and guilty ('cause it costs $3k).

Thoughts?

- CS
Link Posted: 8/2/2017 9:04:29 PM EDT
[#1]
I have nothing for ya man except-Good luck.
3-9 will serve you just fine. 270 is a great caliper,
have to watch the wind though on a long shot.
Link Posted: 8/2/2017 9:07:26 PM EDT
[#2]
Leupold, I'd get one of their 3.5x10 or 4.5x14 versions.
Link Posted: 8/2/2017 9:07:44 PM EDT
[#3]
I'm thinking since the 10x Unertl served the USMC snipers just fine for so many years (until they transitioned to the Schmidt&Bender 3-12x a few years back), a 3-9x is ok too.  Or, how in WWII most of our snipers made do with similar just fine.
Link Posted: 8/3/2017 8:13:07 PM EDT
[#4]
If you have ever hunted in the deep and steep, especially at altitude, you will automatically discount the higher magnification scopes. Shots can be made very late in the day, in clouds and fog and in rain and snow. I would recommend focusing on quality, weight and power in that order. A good light rifle like a Kimber or Weatherby Ultralite in any .257 - 7mm caliber with a quality x5 scope, 2-10, would be my gun for that hunt.

Bonus points for a 6.5 anything! Kimber Mountain Ascent 4lb 13 oz, Weatherby Ultralight 5lb 8oz, either would be a pleasure to carry.
Link Posted: 8/23/2017 8:46:52 PM EDT
[#5]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
If you have ever hunted in the deep and steep, especially at altitude, you will automatically discount the higher magnification scopes. Shots can be made very late in the day, in clouds and fog and in rain and snow. I would recommend focusing on quality, weight and power in that order. A good light rifle like a Kimber or Weatherby Ultralite in any .257 - 7mm caliber with a quality x5 scope, 2-10, would be my gun for that hunt.

Bonus points for a 6.5 anything! Kimber Mountain Ascent 4lb 13 oz, Weatherby Ultralight 5lb 8oz, either would be a pleasure to carry.
View Quote
Plus one on the Kimber Mountain Ascent. The caliber doesn't matter. Buy the lightest Leupold/Nightforce/Swarovski etc in 3-9 or close to that. Been there done that and I was ready to cut my stock in half to cut down on weight. Train like it's your job for months before the hunt to maximize your enjoyment, ability, and potential success.
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