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Link Posted: 2/1/2013 10:02:49 AM EDT
Not sure how many of you wash your clothes around here but we all know that dryer lint is highly flammable. I keep some in an old medicine bottle in my bag. Just another thought.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 11:11:56 PM EDT
A hot melt glue stick is good for repairs if you have fire.
Link Posted: 2/16/2013 9:13:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/16/2013 9:15:15 PM EDT by Greenfeet]
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
How to separate an egg using a water bottle.

Audio is in Chinese but the video is very plain.


Hello everyone, today’s topic is “How to separate out an egg yolk from the egg white.”  The things we’ll need are very simple.  First, we’ll need two plates.  In addition, a (mumble) water bottle.  And of course an egg.  

First, we’ll hit the egg on the side of the plate like this.  

Good. Now we use the water bottle that we have ready to separate it out, using the empty space of the water bottle.  First, squeeze out the air in the water bottle, then put it on the egg yolk like this, and it sucks it in.  Then put it on the empty plate you have ready to the side.  This is extremely (mumble)

Then if you squeeze out the air you can carefully bring the yolk back into the water bottle, and return it to its former place with the egg white.  

Then, watch again.  Carefully suck it into the water bottle again, and move it over.  

What do you think?  It’s really simple right?  Friends, now you have a really easy was to separate out an egg yolk from the white.  


Greenfeet's note: This is a pretty rough translation based on about 5 minutes with the audio.  This girl slurs and mumbles a lot, and the music and loud cracking of an empty water bottle make it harder to hear.  But like Frank said, the video is really plain so the translation is hardly necessary

ETA: I guess my useful trick is: Learn Chinese.  
Link Posted: 2/25/2013 4:23:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/25/2013 9:56:36 PM EDT by DiverDwn]
Originally Posted By xlcooplx:
Not sure how many of you wash your clothes around here but we all know that dryer lint is highly flammable. I keep some in an old medicine bottle in my bag. Just another thought.

Yea, I have a ziplock on the dryer and I stuff the lint from the lint trap in there and when it fills up it goes in the BOB. I guess eventualy I could make a bug out pillow with it.

Link Posted: 2/25/2013 4:33:04 PM EDT
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Originally Posted By brinboise:
Originally Posted By Jeep903:
Haven't read this whole thread yet, nor have I seen the fire starter thread, but I saw that non dairy creamer works well as a fire starter. Just pick up some packs next time you're at the corner store or the office.

Sorry if it's a dupe.


I've heard of this before but never tried it...today is the day!


PSA: There are several household products that are quite flammable if given the proper impetus. Flour and sugar are just two of these. I've been told that fire safety precautions in a sugar mill are every bit as stringent as in an oil refinery.


Just have to get fine enough particles.  Its partially why you get silo explosions.

I've heard that Orange juice concentrate can be used as an explosive.  Then again, my high school chemistry teacher was a little insane

Good firestarter on the cheap.  000/0000 Steel wool and a 9V battery.  Burns hotter then hell.  (the wool, not the battery)

I try to keep a squeeze bottle of hand sanitizer with me in the woods too.  That stuff burns like crazy (yes, I know its straight alcohol)
Link Posted: 3/12/2013 12:13:32 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DiverDwn:
Originally Posted By xlcooplx:
Not sure how many of you wash your clothes around here but we all know that dryer lint is highly flammable. I keep some in an old medicine bottle in my bag. Just another thought.

Yea, I have a ziplock on the dryer and I stuff the lint from the lint trap in there and when it fills up it goes in the BOB. I guess eventualy I could make a bug out pillow with it.



I have been filling the cardboard tubes with the drier lint then pouring in melted vaseline in each end. You can cut these into sections and use them as small fire starters. I tested one the other day. One end burned for 15 minutes then went out. Flipper it over and the other end burned for another 15.
Link Posted: 3/20/2013 2:00:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Solace22:
Originally Posted By DiverDwn:
Originally Posted By xlcooplx:
Not sure how many of you wash your clothes around here but we all know that dryer lint is highly flammable. I keep some in an old medicine bottle in my bag. Just another thought.

Yea, I have a ziplock on the dryer and I stuff the lint from the lint trap in there and when it fills up it goes in the BOB. I guess eventualy I could make a bug out pillow with it.



I have been filling the cardboard tubes with the drier lint then pouring in melted vaseline in each end. You can cut these into sections and use them as small fire starters. I tested one the other day. One end burned for 15 minutes then went out. Flipper it over and the other end burned for another 15.


Been doing the same thing except in empty egg cartons. Very effective
Link Posted: 5/4/2013 9:25:55 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ReaperWaterfowl:
Originally Posted By Solace22:
Originally Posted By DiverDwn:
Originally Posted By xlcooplx:
Not sure how many of you wash your clothes around here but we all know that dryer lint is highly flammable. I keep some in an old medicine bottle in my bag. Just another thought.

Yea, I have a ziplock on the dryer and I stuff the lint from the lint trap in there and when it fills up it goes in the BOB. I guess eventualy I could make a bug out pillow with it.



I have been filling the cardboard tubes with the drier lint then pouring in melted vaseline in each end. You can cut these into sections and use them as small fire starters. I tested one the other day. One end burned for 15 minutes then went out. Flipper it over and the other end burned for another 15.


Been doing the same thing except in empty egg cartons. Very effective


Melted vaseline or parrafin?  Seems like vaseline would be too messy to try and store / haul around.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 5/5/2013 10:17:49 PM EDT
Originally Posted By KiloBravo:
Originally Posted By ReaperWaterfowl:
Originally Posted By Solace22:
Originally Posted By DiverDwn:
Originally Posted By xlcooplx:
Not sure how many of you wash your clothes around here but we all know that dryer lint is highly flammable. I keep some in an old medicine bottle in my bag. Just another thought.

Yea, I have a ziplock on the dryer and I stuff the lint from the lint trap in there and when it fills up it goes in the BOB. I guess eventualy I could make a bug out pillow with it.



I have been filling the cardboard tubes with the drier lint then pouring in melted vaseline in each end. You can cut these into sections and use them as small fire starters. I tested one the other day. One end burned for 15 minutes then went out. Flipper it over and the other end burned for another 15.


Been doing the same thing except in empty egg cartons. Very effective


Melted vaseline or parrafin?  Seems like vaseline would be too messy to try and store / haul around.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


I wonder if you could cap the vaseline-soaked lint with a layer of paraffin.
Link Posted: 5/18/2013 1:48:08 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/6/2013 3:40:58 AM EDT
Find someone who does wood working and get sawdust. Put some in melted parafin and BAM, awesome fire starter. Same with lint, cotton balls, cotton pads to include breat pads etc... Even used a tampon in wax before. Worked great.
Link Posted: 6/6/2013 1:25:43 PM EDT
I looked high and low for a suitable collapsible cup that folds down flat to take out to the field.  All the ones I've seen were the ones with the consecutive rings that folded down to the size of a small hocky puck which is hardly flat.   I used to use those hot beverage bags from MREs, which works all right but I needed something that didn't spill half the content out when I drank from it.  I found the ultimate cheapskate trick that seems to work fine until I find a better solution.

I presume everyone knows how to make one of those origami cups, but if not, here's a quick tutorial-

How to fold an origami cup

Surprisingly the cup does hold water pretty well...BUT becuase they put so many chemicals in paper, any water you put in these things will taste like it came from a chemical waste dump.  I discovered a way to get around it- cut out an aluminum foil square the same size as the square sheet of paper and place it (shiny side out) on top of the paper before folding it.  This creates an aluminum foil liner for the paper cup which protects the flavor of whatever beverage you put in it, while the paper makes the aluminum foil rigid and actually gives pretty good insulation properties.  Best part of all, they fold literally flat so several of them can be put into a MRE hot beverage bag and tucked inside the lining of a 2 quart canteen.

They come out looking ridiculous but I've used these things to hold everything from hot tea to Miso soup and they hold up pretty well.   The aluminum foil actually holds the heat in better than the transparent plastic of the MRE hot beverage bag.  Best part of all is that they're reusable AND disposable, and if you rip off laser printer paper from work they cost almost nothing.  The only downside is that they don't have a base so you need to prop it up in between two rocks if you want to set it down.

I'm sure there are better solutions out there but until I find it, I'm going by the philosophy that if it's stupid but works, it's not stupid.
Link Posted: 6/6/2013 1:53:39 PM EDT
Then there's the "use your watch as a compass" trick-

1) Find the sun.  It's the big bright thing in the sky.  You can't miss it.

2) take your watch (they analog type with the hands) and aim the hour hand toward the direction of the sun.

3) Now imagine an imaginary line running halfway between the hour hand, and the 12 o'clock position.  For instace, if the hour hand is on the 2, the imaginary line would be on the 1.

5) That imaginary line is actually pointing south...or close enough to south that you'd care about.

6) Once you have south, you now have north, east, and west.

It works the exact opposite way that a sundial does, in that you already have the time from the watch and you use it along with the position of the sun to reverse engineer the points of the compass.  This is the trick I used to find our way out of the deep woods after my girlfriend got us lost by jumping from hiking trail to hiking trail until we didn't know where the hell we were anymore.  

If you're lucky you'll be doing this at noon when the hour hand and the imaginary line are both on the 12 o'clock position, proving once again that at noon the sun will be directly south, in case you needed the watch trick to tell you that.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 11:24:58 AM EDT
Bump to keep this going....
Link Posted: 8/5/2013 2:06:06 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By NorthPolar:

Good firestarter on the cheap.  000/0000 Steel wool and a 9V battery.  Burns hotter then hell.  (the wool, not the battery)

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Don't know if this is considered a "cheap" survival trick, but after tinkering around with different fire starting technologies, so far the best one I've seen is magnesium powder (which you can buy off Amazon).

A) Collect your kindling and put it in a pile.
B) sprinkle a bit of magnesium powder on the kindling
C) Use flint and steel to ignite the powder (in my case, I use a one handed blastmatch and a small pocket knife; the knife blade can be used as a ladle to sprinkle the magnesium powder.
D) While the magnesium powder begins to burn, sprinkle (or in my case, ladle by using the blade of a small pocket knife) more magnesium powder over the burning kindling.
E) it will instantly erupt into a 3000 degree flame that looks like it came from the depths of hell, which will burn even wet wood.

You can get a good sized fire going quite quickly with the stuff..  The great thing about it is that you don't need to keep your materials dry like you do matches, and you can start dozens of fires with just a tiny bag of it.  Really amazing stuff.
Link Posted: 8/6/2013 8:56:31 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By GoodOlDave:


Don't know if this is considered a "cheap" survival trick, but after tinkering around with different fire starting technologies, so far the best one I've seen is magnesium powder (which you can buy off Amazon).

A) Collect your kindling and put it in a pile.
B) sprinkle a bit of magnesium powder on the kindling
C) Use flint and steel to ignite the powder (in my case, I use a one handed blastmatch and a small pocket knife; the knife blade can be used as a ladle to sprinkle the magnesium powder.
D) While the magnesium powder begins to burn, sprinkle (or in my case, ladle by using the blade of a small pocket knife) more magnesium powder over the burning kindling.
E) it will instantly erupt into a 3000 degree flame that looks like it came from the depths of hell, which will burn even wet wood.

You can get a good sized fire going quite quickly with the stuff..  The great thing about it is that you don't need to keep your materials dry like you do matches, and you can start dozens of fires with just a tiny bag of it.  Really amazing stuff.
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Originally Posted By GoodOlDave:
Originally Posted By NorthPolar:

Good firestarter on the cheap.  000/0000 Steel wool and a 9V battery.  Burns hotter then hell.  (the wool, not the battery)



Don't know if this is considered a "cheap" survival trick, but after tinkering around with different fire starting technologies, so far the best one I've seen is magnesium powder (which you can buy off Amazon).

A) Collect your kindling and put it in a pile.
B) sprinkle a bit of magnesium powder on the kindling
C) Use flint and steel to ignite the powder (in my case, I use a one handed blastmatch and a small pocket knife; the knife blade can be used as a ladle to sprinkle the magnesium powder.
D) While the magnesium powder begins to burn, sprinkle (or in my case, ladle by using the blade of a small pocket knife) more magnesium powder over the burning kindling.
E) it will instantly erupt into a 3000 degree flame that looks like it came from the depths of hell, which will burn even wet wood.

You can get a good sized fire going quite quickly with the stuff..  The great thing about it is that you don't need to keep your materials dry like you do matches, and you can start dozens of fires with just a tiny bag of it.  Really amazing stuff.



This is not the food grade powder is it? What search are you using in Amazon for this?
Link Posted: 8/6/2013 11:01:53 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/6/2013 11:15:04 AM EDT by GoodOlDave]
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Originally Posted By walt_l:



This is not the food grade powder is it? What search are you using in Amazon for this?
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Originally Posted By walt_l:
Originally Posted By GoodOlDave:
Originally Posted By NorthPolar:

Good firestarter on the cheap.  000/0000 Steel wool and a 9V battery.  Burns hotter then hell.  (the wool, not the battery)



Don't know if this is considered a "cheap" survival trick, but after tinkering around with different fire starting technologies, so far the best one I've seen is magnesium powder (which you can buy off Amazon).

A) Collect your kindling and put it in a pile.
B) sprinkle a bit of magnesium powder on the kindling
C) Use flint and steel to ignite the powder (in my case, I use a one handed blastmatch and a small pocket knife; the knife blade can be used as a ladle to sprinkle the magnesium powder.
D) While the magnesium powder begins to burn, sprinkle (or in my case, ladle by using the blade of a small pocket knife) more magnesium powder over the burning kindling.
E) it will instantly erupt into a 3000 degree flame that looks like it came from the depths of hell, which will burn even wet wood.

You can get a good sized fire going quite quickly with the stuff..  The great thing about it is that you don't need to keep your materials dry like you do matches, and you can start dozens of fires with just a tiny bag of it.  Really amazing stuff.



This is not the food grade powder is it? What search are you using in Amazon for this?


No it's the pyrotechnical grade magnesium, which they do sell on Amazon.   Do a search for Magnesium powder.

magnesium powder on Amazon

I myself bought it off Ebay instead because I only needed a once ounce bag which is plenty for my camping gear and I only paid like four bucks including shipping.  It is literally the same thing as those magnesium blocks you get at the camping stores that you use a knife to scrape particles off of, except that it's essentially pre-scraped for you.  Using just the magnesium powder removes the whole need to carry additional tinder like cotton balls or dryer lint.

I compared it with using matches; the match would start the kindling burning but you have to keep gently blowing on it for the flame to really catch, and sometimes it still went out..  Magnesium powder got the entire kindling pile burning in like five seconds.  I also tried using the magnesium block and cotton ball route- if it's even remotely windy out your scrapings are just going to be blown away.  Utterly pointless.
Link Posted: 8/8/2013 4:20:13 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By GoodOlDave:


No it's the pyrotechnical grade magnesium, which they do sell on Amazon.   Do a search for Magnesium powder.

magnesium powder on Amazon

I myself bought it off Ebay instead because I only needed a once ounce bag which is plenty for my camping gear and I only paid like four bucks including shipping.  It is literally the same thing as those magnesium blocks you get at the camping stores that you use a knife to scrape particles off of, except that it's essentially pre-scraped for you.  Using just the magnesium powder removes the whole need to carry additional tinder like cotton balls or dryer lint.

I compared it with using matches; the match would start the kindling burning but you have to keep gently blowing on it for the flame to really catch, and sometimes it still went out..  Magnesium powder got the entire kindling pile burning in like five seconds.  I also tried using the magnesium block and cotton ball route- if it's even remotely windy out your scrapings are just going to be blown away.  Utterly pointless.
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Originally Posted By GoodOlDave:
Originally Posted By walt_l:
Originally Posted By GoodOlDave:
Originally Posted By NorthPolar:

Good firestarter on the cheap.  000/0000 Steel wool and a 9V battery.  Burns hotter then hell.  (the wool, not the battery)



Don't know if this is considered a "cheap" survival trick, but after tinkering around with different fire starting technologies, so far the best one I've seen is magnesium powder (which you can buy off Amazon).

A) Collect your kindling and put it in a pile.
B) sprinkle a bit of magnesium powder on the kindling
C) Use flint and steel to ignite the powder (in my case, I use a one handed blastmatch and a small pocket knife; the knife blade can be used as a ladle to sprinkle the magnesium powder.
D) While the magnesium powder begins to burn, sprinkle (or in my case, ladle by using the blade of a small pocket knife) more magnesium powder over the burning kindling.
E) it will instantly erupt into a 3000 degree flame that looks like it came from the depths of hell, which will burn even wet wood.

You can get a good sized fire going quite quickly with the stuff..  The great thing about it is that you don't need to keep your materials dry like you do matches, and you can start dozens of fires with just a tiny bag of it.  Really amazing stuff.



This is not the food grade powder is it? What search are you using in Amazon for this?


No it's the pyrotechnical grade magnesium, which they do sell on Amazon.   Do a search for Magnesium powder.

magnesium powder on Amazon

I myself bought it off Ebay instead because I only needed a once ounce bag which is plenty for my camping gear and I only paid like four bucks including shipping.  It is literally the same thing as those magnesium blocks you get at the camping stores that you use a knife to scrape particles off of, except that it's essentially pre-scraped for you.  Using just the magnesium powder removes the whole need to carry additional tinder like cotton balls or dryer lint.

I compared it with using matches; the match would start the kindling burning but you have to keep gently blowing on it for the flame to really catch, and sometimes it still went out..  Magnesium powder got the entire kindling pile burning in like five seconds.  I also tried using the magnesium block and cotton ball route- if it's even remotely windy out your scrapings are just going to be blown away.  Utterly pointless.



If you REALLY want to see something impressive... put a little water on a burning pile of magnesium. Link to vid
Link Posted: 8/13/2013 9:14:04 PM EDT
I wonder if you could cap the vaseline-soaked lint with a layer of paraffin.

I just conducted a little experiment based on this idea.


Lit a few candles and let them burn for a few minutes.

Dripped a bit of wax around the inside of one end of the roll and stuffed a bit of 0000 steel wool into it while the wax was still wet. This "glued" the steel wool into it.

Next I stuffed about an inch of dryer lint into the roll and soaked it in wax. I then added several successive layers of dryer lint into the roll, soaking each layer in wax.

Plugged the other end with steel wool and wax just like the opposite side.

Put it in my BBQ grill and lit it with a 9 volt battery.

It ignited almost immediately and created a very hot, almost smokeless fire that lasted, unassisted, for 28 minutes before it finally burned out.


I think I'm going to make a few of these and tape a 9 volt battery to each one. Small, lightweight, and easy to start a fire with. Even if you don't have any dry wood to burn, the roll will give you enough heat and light to cook a meal or maybe even boil some water just by itself. My daughter heated up some marshmallows on it.

Damn I love this forum, you guys keep giving me neat experiments to conduct.
Link Posted: 9/12/2013 10:37:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2013 10:39:44 PM EDT by EXPY37]
Had to make a memory state replacement battery pack for an HP 8566 spec-an a week ago.

It originally used 2 AA nicads and the replacement is $$$ from Agilent.

I found that Eneloop AA's solder beautifully with an iron at ~800F and quick tin and get off.

Works fine to make larger battery packs, etc, by soldering the AA's together. Easy to take apart and redo too.



Eneloops are great!



Link Posted: 10/30/2013 2:01:08 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By tveddy:


UV doesnt penetrate anything that isn't clear. better off to get a pressure cooker setup and mimick an autoclave.
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Originally Posted By tveddy:
Originally Posted By Dragynn:
Okay, today's WTF moment, stems from pondering sterilization methods for the homemade clot gauze I mentioned above.

Enter UV lightbulbs.    Checking out the Steripen which is just a little UV light you dunk in water, 45-70 bucks, bulb is rated to last 50 hours. But is supposed to sterilize yer water.

Found a two-pack of Amertac 6" flourescent utility lights at Lowe's for 10 bucks, they run on AA batteries (awesome, portable) or AC with the proper converter.

Found 6" flourescent germicidal UV tubes on Ebay for 13 bucks for two delivered. Bulbs are rated at 10,000 hours

Total 23 bucks and change for 20,000 hours of portable UV sterilization, I don't reckon you have to dip the tubes like you do the steripen, the principle is the same as they are doing with clear plastic bottles and water in Africa and elsewhere, just leaving them in the sun for a few hours, it's the UV light that is killing the bugs, the steripen is just concentrating that light, only takes a minute. Should just be a matter of filling a clear bottle with water and hitting 'em with one of these babies (which is a lot more light anyway than the little steripen puts out) for a minute or so, longer if you want to be sure.

I'm going to use it on my homemade clot-gauze stuff, before and after it's packaged in clear plastic, just for some measure of sterility, and whatever else, then stash them with the bug-out gear.

YMMV, be careful if you mess with this kind of UV light, it IS dangerous, can give you skin cancer if you put it on you for too long, mess up your eyes etc. Don't be stupid, wear eye protection .

Any thoughts on this or feedback very welcomed, i'm just learning here too.


UV doesnt penetrate anything that isn't clear. better off to get a pressure cooker setup and mimick an autoclave.


That's a thought, we do have a pressure cooker.....main problem i've had, is our crappy cheap food sealer doesn't work worth a hoot, need a new one,trying to figure out what's the best one for the buck.  

Quick tip for the thread, can't remember if I previously posted this, was actually the wife's idea: Take an old nose spray bottle like Afrin or whatever, clean it out, re-fill with hydrogen peroxide and keep in your IFAK or whatever type of first aid pouch you use, makes an awesome quick one-time irrigation tool for deep cuts and such before you bandage them.
Link Posted: 10/30/2013 2:05:02 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By NorthPolar:

Good firestarter on the cheap.  000/0000 Steel wool and a 9V battery.  Burns hotter then hell.  (the wool, not the battery)
View Quote


So you just use the steel wool to create a direct short across the leads of the battery? Kinda like a car cigarette lighter?
Link Posted: 11/25/2013 7:53:38 PM EDT
Yes sir.

Link Posted: 12/7/2013 6:55:36 PM EDT
Tyvek Home Wrap.

I use it as a waterproof ground sheet and it's the cat's ass. I hammock camp and it's nice to have a clean surface to drop feet on in the morning or just to sit on. They even make grommet kits for it for shelter use.

One thing....It's best to wash it a couple times in the washing machine along with some old tennis shoes to soften it up a bit.

If you go light it can be used as the back pad in a ultra light sil-pack.
Link Posted: 12/9/2013 3:41:21 AM EDT
Billboardtarps.com

They sell surplus billboard covers. They don't paint billboards anymore, they make large tarps with the pics and lettering on them and hang them on a billboard. They stay up a few weeks or months, then are taken down. They are made of sunlight-resistant plastic and have a mesh in the middle of 3 layers.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 11:05:03 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Billboardtarps.com

They sell surplus billboard covers. They don't paint billboards anymore, they make large tarps with the pics and lettering on them and hang them on a billboard. They stay up a few weeks or months, then are taken down. They are made of sunlight-resistant plastic and have a mesh in the middle of 3 layers.
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I'm going to have to look at these. My old USGI tarp is getting kinda warn.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 7:08:54 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By D_CRISIS:


I'm going to have to look at these. My old USGI tarp is getting kinda warn.
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Originally Posted By D_CRISIS:
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Billboardtarps.com

They sell surplus billboard covers. They don't paint billboards anymore, they make large tarps with the pics and lettering on them and hang them on a billboard. They stay up a few weeks or months, then are taken down. They are made of sunlight-resistant plastic and have a mesh in the middle of 3 layers.


I'm going to have to look at these. My old USGI tarp is getting kinda warn.

They claim to be able to cover a baseball diamond. YMMV.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 11:56:45 PM EDT
... Yeah I don't think I want one quite that big.
Link Posted: 12/17/2013 11:48:54 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By raf:
One thing that the ALICE pack lacks is compression straps.  We all start out with a pack more-or-less full, but as time goes by, the food contents get used up, and the pack gets a bit sloppy, with adverse impact on the user's balance. For you tactical types, subtract ammo used, and the effect is even more pronounced.

The solution is simple.  Examine the ALICE pack closely, and you will see sewn-on webbing on the sides that will easily accept 1" horizontal straps that wrap around the body of the pack, and will serve to compress the back into a stable, compact, non-shifting unit.  A closer examination will show that the straps on the pockets––not the pocket flaps–– have a space behind them so the user can put his finger beneath the snaps to press the halves of the snaps together.  By happy coincidence, this space behind the webbing on the pocket will allow a 1" strap to be threaded through all the pockets, serving as an additional compression strap.

Between the original tunnels on the ALICE, and the pocket closure tunnels, the user should be able to install a sufficient amount of horizontal compression straps to accomodate most any need.  Vertical compression can be done via use of the existing top flap straps.

Now you're asking where to get the straps.  All right, go here: http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/20-new-swiss-military-web-straps-olive-drab.aspx?a=561508 for Swiss OD adjustable, QD straps, which are perfect for this application.  Be advised that the fastex-style QD buckles will NOT mate to most US-available genuine fastex (or close foreign copy) buckles, but for a stand-alone use, such as compression straps, this matters little.

There is plenty of life in a good condition ALICE pack.  You all update the green tick as enforcer suggests, and you'll have the equal of packs costing many hundreds of dollars more.
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We just used bunjees to take up the slack and compress.
Link Posted: 12/17/2013 11:58:00 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Toyforever:
One my grandfather taught me way back when, carry a can of starting fluid in you car/truck. If you are out in the backwoods and hit something hard enough to knock the tire bead off the rim, pull tire lay and lay it on it's side on the ground. Make sure the side touching the ground is on the bead of the rim, pull top side as tight as you can the spray the tire/bead area with starting fluid and light quickly-will heat air in tire and "pop" tire back on bead with a little pressure. You will still have to check air pressure and inflate but this will save some backbraking time and headache trying to reset bead.
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People that have never done this need to be careful. There are many instances where a rim has blown right up into someone's head and killed them. This used to be/still is a common meathod on semi truck tires.
Link Posted: 12/17/2013 11:59:42 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:


The best therapy for athlete's foot (for me) is to mount a determined offensive on it. First of all, CONTAIN THAT CALLUS! Callus is (mostly) dead skin, and it cracks easily. Cracks are the method by which the fungus bypasses your body's first line of defense, i.e. your skin. So shave* and file the calluses, THEN apply the Tinactin or whatever antifungal cream you use.

I was surprised to find just how deep the cracks went.


*Yes I said SHAVE. There are callus shaving devices out there, usually found in the cosmetics department. After a bath or shower, when the skin is soft and wet, shave a few peels off your foot. You will be surprised at how much material you can take off without hurting your feet!
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Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Originally Posted By arcticwarrior:
See, now you ruined it.  It must have been psychosomatic because it has worked for me for years.    Now watch, it won't work anymore.  I have always known the medics have a great if not warped sense of humor as well.  


The best therapy for athlete's foot (for me) is to mount a determined offensive on it. First of all, CONTAIN THAT CALLUS! Callus is (mostly) dead skin, and it cracks easily. Cracks are the method by which the fungus bypasses your body's first line of defense, i.e. your skin. So shave* and file the calluses, THEN apply the Tinactin or whatever antifungal cream you use.

I was surprised to find just how deep the cracks went.


*Yes I said SHAVE. There are callus shaving devices out there, usually found in the cosmetics department. After a bath or shower, when the skin is soft and wet, shave a few peels off your foot. You will be surprised at how much material you can take off without hurting your feet!


No effing way. We try to build these up so we don't screw up our feet on long road marches.
Link Posted: 1/13/2014 6:08:13 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By ReconB4:


People that have never done this need to be careful. There are many instances where a rim has blown right up into someone's head and killed them. This used to be/still is a common meathod on semi truck tires.
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Originally Posted By ReconB4:
Originally Posted By Toyforever:
One my grandfather taught me way back when, carry a can of starting fluid in you car/truck. If you are out in the backwoods and hit something hard enough to knock the tire bead off the rim, pull tire lay and lay it on it's side on the ground. Make sure the side touching the ground is on the bead of the rim, pull top side as tight as you can the spray the tire/bead area with starting fluid and light quickly-will heat air in tire and "pop" tire back on bead with a little pressure. You will still have to check air pressure and inflate but this will save some backbraking time and headache trying to reset bead.


People that have never done this need to be careful. There are many instances where a rim has blown right up into someone's head and killed them. This used to be/still is a common meathod on semi truck tires.



Here is another method of resetting a bead, this is done a lot in the off road community to my knowledge. Fingers crossed the link works haha.

http://youtu.be/uPWGxsqohME
Link Posted: 1/13/2014 6:49:04 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By 04ChevyHD:



Here is another method of resetting a bead, this is done a lot in the off road community to my knowledge. Fingers crossed the link works haha.

http://youtu.be/uPWGxsqohME
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Originally Posted By 04ChevyHD:
Originally Posted By ReconB4:
Originally Posted By Toyforever:
One my grandfather taught me way back when, carry a can of starting fluid in you car/truck. If you are out in the backwoods and hit something hard enough to knock the tire bead off the rim, pull tire lay and lay it on it's side on the ground. Make sure the side touching the ground is on the bead of the rim, pull top side as tight as you can the spray the tire/bead area with starting fluid and light quickly-will heat air in tire and "pop" tire back on bead with a little pressure. You will still have to check air pressure and inflate but this will save some backbraking time and headache trying to reset bead.


People that have never done this need to be careful. There are many instances where a rim has blown right up into someone's head and killed them. This used to be/still is a common meathod on semi truck tires.



Here is another method of resetting a bead, this is done a lot in the off road community to my knowledge. Fingers crossed the link works haha.

http://youtu.be/uPWGxsqohME


That's how we did tractor tires on the farm if we didn't have any starter fluid.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 10:44:06 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By D_CRISIS:


I'm going to have to look at these. My old USGI tarp is getting kinda warn.
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Originally Posted By D_CRISIS:
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Billboardtarps.com

They sell surplus billboard covers. They don't paint billboards anymore, they make large tarps with the pics and lettering on them and hang them on a billboard. They stay up a few weeks or months, then are taken down. They are made of sunlight-resistant plastic and have a mesh in the middle of 3 layers.


I'm going to have to look at these. My old USGI tarp is getting kinda warn.


I helped some buddies cover the leaking roof of their hunting cabin with it before (as a temporary fix).  It held up for a year or two until the roof was properly fixed.
Link Posted: 1/31/2014 12:48:15 PM EDT
If you have a metal water bottle on the fire, hook a carabiner in the mouth of the bottle and use as a handle.
Link Posted: 2/1/2014 2:18:27 AM EDT
if you work for a local gov agency, make friends w/your emergency manager...via ours, I just recently scored a few cases of mre's for free.
Link Posted: 2/6/2014 11:34:14 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By iammrbill:
if you work for a local gov agency, make friends w/your emergency manager...via ours, I just recently scored a few cases of mre's for free.
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His giving you a box of those dreadful old omelet MREs doesn't sound like he's much of a friend
Link Posted: 2/11/2014 2:17:24 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By GoodOlDave:
His giving you a box of those dreadful old omelet MREs doesn't sound like he's much of a friend
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they're the good ones. assorted meals complete w/heaters
Link Posted: 2/20/2014 5:09:53 AM EDT
Cell phone batteries also will get fine steel wool going like the 9volt batts.

Another fire starter trick. Materials needed..... vaseline, cotton balls or dryer lint, drinking straws. Take the cotton balls or dryer lint and put in a ziploc with vaseline and squish it around and get it mixed up good. Then take your straws, cut them in half and on one end melt it and then pinch it closed while the plastic is still soft and melty. Then stuff your vaseline soaked material into the straw with a q-tip or tooth pick or whatever then melt that end and pinch it shut. You now have sealed waterproof firestarters that are super light weight. When you need it, slit the side of the straw and pull some of the material out but leave the rest in the straw and it will burn quite well for awhile. The plastic melting and burning helps too.
Link Posted: 3/10/2014 5:25:58 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/11/2014 2:09:19 PM EDT by Waldo]


Removed~ Waldo

COC6
Link Posted: 3/11/2014 2:04:19 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By showpare:

...snip...
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Classy.


Also reported.
Link Posted: 3/16/2014 7:08:43 AM EDT
I was out of line and agree with the rules. Thanks for the smack and nudge to re-read the site rules.


Back to business

When making gear and kit bags, go to Goodwill and look at what they have to offer.  Generally, they have good condition nylon civilian nondescript bags for $0.50 to $2.50.  I have used these to compartmentalize our generator gear, cooking gear, and emergency heating gear.   Make a hang tag of contents of each kit bag and have it laminated at Office Depot to zip tie to a handle.  We keep a cheap headlamp in each bag, too. Helps keep things neat and findable when the lights are out.  

Link Posted: 6/20/2014 8:38:32 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By GoodOlDave:


His giving you a box of those dreadful old omelet MREs doesn't sound like he's much of a friend
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Originally Posted By GoodOlDave:
Originally Posted By iammrbill:
if you work for a local gov agency, make friends w/your emergency manager...via ours, I just recently scored a few cases of mre's for free.


His giving you a box of those dreadful old omelet MREs doesn't sound like he's much of a friend


Ya, those were the only MRE that made me spit it out- and I ate MRE's wearing chocolate chip cammies.    WTF do you have to do to an egg that makes it last forever?   Ruin it I guess.
Link Posted: 6/21/2014 8:21:49 PM EDT
This could be an important survival skill!

making string from a plastic bottle
Link Posted: 6/22/2014 10:48:52 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
This could be an important survival skill!

making string from a plastic bottle
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VERY cool! I'd buy one if I knew where!!
Link Posted: 6/26/2014 1:11:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/26/2014 1:21:40 AM EDT by Blackoperations]
Thought I would share a recent "project", I call the Tic Tac Ammo Case!

16, 9mm rounds, fit into a Tic Tac case (note the very slight bulged in the center), with proper taping, they are guaranteed 100% water resistant :

48 rounds, 115grain FMJ 9mm weighs approx 1lb 5oz:




48, 22LR rounds, fit nicely into a Tic Tac case, 144 rounds weigh approx 1lb, 1oz:





3 Tic Tac 9mm cases, will refill a Keltec PF9 six times, (7+1 divide by 48):





A Keltec PF9 w/full mag (7rd) and 3 Tic Tac 9mm cases weighs, 2lb 8 oz, that is 55 rounds total (48 rounds + 7 round mag)! :




For what its worth, nine .223 rounds fit in the "Tic Tac" case (w/bulging), not sure how practical .223 is stored in this fashion? 9 rounds weigh approx 4oz:





Hopefully this thread will help/inspire those with a BOB concerned about weight, or perhaps even the ultralight backpackers out there.

Cheers
Link Posted: 6/26/2014 10:29:03 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By walt_l:


VERY cool! I'd buy one if I knew where!!
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Originally Posted By walt_l:
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
This could be an important survival skill!

making string from a plastic bottle


VERY cool! I'd buy one if I knew where!!


MAKE IT.
Link Posted: 10/3/2014 9:06:45 PM EDT
If your headlights are cloudy you can use off to restore them. I used to wet sand them but off works just as good and it's just spray on wipe off.
Link Posted: 11/8/2014 9:51:37 AM EDT
Since it’s dark when the power fails, we used Glow in the Dark duct tape to mark the “House Power” and “Generator Power” on outlets in the basement.  Plus, tagged the furnace power cord with “Furnace Power”  so sweet wife and can see the outlets easier in a power outage.  Additionally, we put the same verbiage on reflective tape, so it will catch the eye when the flashlight glints off of it.  
The Glow in the Dark duct tape package mentions it takes 30 minutes to charge the tape.  After about 30 seconds, it’s bright enough to see the verbiage.  The second level is the reflective tape that is readable with almost any flashlight.  Used two different types labeling with the hope that one is more permanent than the other.   If I can get decent pics, I’ll edit and post.

Did the same thing in the garage with the house to generator plug.
Link Posted: 5/27/2015 11:29:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/27/2015 11:37:49 PM EDT by WSS]
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Originally Posted By Toyforever:
One my grandfather taught me way back when, carry a can of starting fluid in you car/truck. If you are out in the backwoods and hit something hard enough to knock the tire bead off the rim, pull tire lay and lay it on it's side on the ground. Make sure the side touching the ground is on the bead of the rim, pull top side as tight as you can the spray the tire/bead area with starting fluid and light quickly-will heat air in tire and "pop" tire back on bead with a little pressure. You will still have to check air pressure and inflate but this will save some backbraking time and headache trying to reset bead.
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Oldtimers trick that works! Now they use a tank with a 2" outlet that has been flattened and dump it in quick to achieve the same "pop". If you find your fresh out of starting fluid, hair spray works too. At least the good stuff did. LOL

Another trick seen on the trail is to use a ratchet strap around the middle of the tire to compress the center and force the beads outward, then pull valve core if you can and fill till it pops on the lips (not pops literally, as in overpressure). The wider, the better. Two inch wide ratchet straps are fairly effortless, while the one inch takes a little effort and finesse.

WSS
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