Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 9/29/2011 3:10:37 AM EST
Co-worker gave me an old grinder that's in good shape. I was thinking of maybe sandblasting it, but it looked like it might be galvanized and I didn't want to ruin the finish, or what's left of it. Any ideas for cleaning it up?

Link Posted: 9/29/2011 3:24:31 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2011 3:26:00 AM EST by Badlatitude]
Hot soapy water and a sponge. Maybe a brillo pad to clean the bad spots? Ive never seen one rust like that.

It almost looks like its been sitting outside for some time.
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 3:58:06 AM EST
I am a big fan of Naval Jelly and a tooth brush. Then, hot soapy water
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 4:03:27 AM EST
After soap and water washing, lube with vegetable oil. Wash again .
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 4:12:26 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2011 4:13:40 AM EST by red_on_black]
I know it's a meat grinder, but you could try to run some grain through it. The bran, husk, and any residual chaff might help loosen and clean-out some of the rust in the bore and on the screw.

ETA: Also, you may be missing a cutter. Mine has a cross-shaped cutter that is pressed forward against the grinder plate by the screw.
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 5:37:21 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2011 5:38:49 AM EST by tommygun2000]
It wasn't galvanized, it was most likely tinned.

Have it bead blasted and replated with tin.
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 7:35:26 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2011 7:39:03 AM EST by douglasmorris99]
it was probably galvanized once upon a time,,once you get water under that process, it turns to crap in a few years.

Wire Brush in your drill
wire brush by hand
course sandpaper
fine sand paper


BAKE ON Finish like Ceracote on the MAIN Body, handle and Face plate bracket only and will last 2 more lifetimes.

the worm gear, plates, and blade, after clean up, wipe with light mineral or light olive oil store in plastic bags until used,rince priort to use clean and repeat oiled storage.

CHEF

you can get it electro plated, but that expense may well exceed buying an new grinder..
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 10:42:00 AM EST
I'd use 0000 steel wool and some WD 40. Should leave the plating intact. WD 40 is used on food handling equipment, and you're going to wash it afterward, anyway.

WD 40 and 0000 steel wool is good for removing surface rust on guns.
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 1:52:18 PM EST
If you have a air compressor, try doing the DIY Soda Blaster, much safer on metals than sand blasting.
DIY Soda Blaster
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 2:35:37 PM EST
Yes, I have the blades. Was inspecting them and didn't have them in pic. It was sitting in his barn for a while, but for the price I thought it would be worth the effort to clean up and try out.

Will try a scotch pad/steel wool, wash, then soak in oil and report back.
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 9:19:45 PM EST
Molasses and water. Let it sit for a few days.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 3:33:39 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 3:37:41 AM EST by wshbrngr]
Personally, I would put that one back together and display it in my mancave.

This looks a lot like what you have, and for the price,
I would forgo all the work of cleaning/refurbishing the free one.

There seem to be plenty of new ones available in various styles for under $50.

(Of course, yours may be a 100yr old made in U.S.A. model - perhaps it is worth refurbishing)
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:44:31 PM EST
Originally Posted By tommygun2000:
It wasn't galvanized, it was most likely tinned.

Have it bead blasted and replated with tin.


This.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:28:48 PM EST
I have one in worse shape that I've done nothing with yet. I got it for $1 at a yard sale.

My idea was to figure out how to get it down to bare metal, then season it like a cast iron skillet.

Is that a stupid idea?

-Slice
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:01:29 PM EST
Get it sand-blasted, then take all of the parts to a plater and have him do a cheap, fast-blast nickel or chrome job, no polish, etc....about $20.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 11:49:08 PM EST
Originally Posted By HomeSlice:
I have one in worse shape that I've done nothing with yet. I got it for $1 at a yard sale.

My idea was to figure out how to get it down to bare metal, then season it like a cast iron skillet.

Is that a stupid idea?

-Slice


Yes it is.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 11:53:15 PM EST
Originally Posted By BatchelorGroda:
Get it sand-blasted, then take all of the parts to a plater and have him do a cheap, fast-blast nickel or chrome job, no polish, etc....about $20.


If its going to be used, I'd get it tin plated, its non toxic.

Link Posted: 10/1/2011 2:24:09 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/1/2011 2:26:57 AM EST by douglasmorris99]
"tinning" is no longer recognised as a safe or viable application in food service,,and hasnt been for 40 years of my knowledge.. THOUGH,,there is still some tinned cans used in pineapple and mandarin orange sections imported from CHINA..



Tin is mainly applied in various organic substances. The organic tin bonds are the most dangerous forms of tin for humans. Despite the dangers they are applied in a great number of industries, such as the paint industry and the plastic industry, and in agriculture through pesticides. The number of applications of organic tin substances is still increasing, despite the fact that we know the consequences of tin poisoning.
The effects of organic tin substances can vary. They depend upon the kind of substance that is present and the organism that is exposed to it. Triethyltin is the most dangerous organic tin substance for humans. It has relatively short hydrogen bonds. When hydrogen bonds grow longer a tin substance will be less dangerous to human health. Humans can absorb tin bonds through food and breathing and through the skin.
The uptake of tin bonds can cause acute effects as well as long-term effects.

Acute effects are:
- Eye and skin irritations
- Headaches
- Stomachaches
- Sickness and dizziness
- Severe sweating
- Breathlessness
- Urination problems

Long-term effects are:
- Depressions
- Liver damage
- Malfunctioning of immune systems
- Chromosomal damage
- Shortage of red blood cells
- Brain damage (causing anger, sleeping disorders, forgetfulness and headaches)



not that I know a thing about food prep, storage and consumption..

I will stand by my suggestions above of cermacoat
though ALL Chemical process should be avoided in consumption, including the use of aluminum cookware
but, youre gonna die of something Stroke and Brain damage beyond what booze and drugs has already done is not my cup of tea,,or ground beef
Chef
Link Posted: 10/1/2011 5:19:22 AM EST

Originally Posted By tommygun2000:
Originally Posted By HomeSlice:
I have one in worse shape that I've done nothing with yet. I got it for $1 at a yard sale.

My idea was to figure out how to get it down to bare metal, then season it like a cast iron skillet.

Is that a stupid idea?

-Slice


Yes it is.


Care to elaborate?

Link Posted: 10/1/2011 5:40:10 AM EST
Originally Posted By HomeSlice:
I have one in worse shape that I've done nothing with yet. I got it for $1 at a yard sale.

My idea was to figure out how to get it down to bare metal, then season it like a cast iron skillet.

Is that a stupid idea?

-Slice



Slice, I don't think that will work in this case. The grinder plate and cutters should be steel, and the worm drive may be. On mine, the worm drive and the body of the grinder are cast aluminum. I'm pretty sure you can't season aluminum or steel the same way you can season cast iron.
Link Posted: 10/1/2011 11:15:27 AM EST
Buy new insides and just clean up the body
Top Top