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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 10/8/2007 10:08:24 AM EST
Picked up a Brand new 3500 watt generator and finished my preps. Im going back to Iraq and wanted to make sure the wife and kids were set. Showed the wifey how to work the genny and now i can relax. Ive always wanted a good generator for just in case. Any suggestions from Generator owners for making it last?
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 10:12:58 AM EST
Make SURE she knows it's only for outdoor use. I'm not calling her dumb, but some women out there think the garage is far enough outdoors to use something like that. I've seen both men and women warm up a car in a closed garage, running a generator inside is just as bad if not worse.

Link Posted: 10/8/2007 10:16:44 AM EST

Originally Posted By glockaboom:
Make SURE she knows it's only for outdoor use. I'm not calling her dumb, but some women out there think the garage is far enough outdoors to use something like that. I've seen both men and women warm up a car in a closed garage, running a generator inside is just as bad if not worse.




And don't run it right near the house. A local firefighters family lost their house last year when he was on duty after Hurricane Wilma. They were running on generator power and the oil filler cap was cracked and squirted oil on the side of the house. The generator caught on fire and burned the house down. The family was o.k., but the house was total loss.
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 10:16:52 AM EST
If a fuel refill is required, let the genny cool down a little. Gas is very dangerous or maybe I'm just paranoid.
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 10:40:22 AM EST
Make sure she understands what a 3500 watt generator will and won't run. She will only be able to run a few of the appliances she is used to using and will have to stagger her usage.
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 10:42:32 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/8/2007 1:35:31 PM EST by txgp17]
3500 watts = 2 hair dryers

Give her a quick lesson on Amps x Volts = Watts, and an overview of how many of these things certain types of devices consume.
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 1:12:30 PM EST

Originally Posted By glockaboom:
Make SURE she knows it's only for outdoor use. I'm not calling her dumb, but some women out there think the garage is far enough outdoors to use something like that. I've seen both men and women warm up a car in a closed garage, running a generator inside is just as bad if not worse.



+1....I know a guy who put his in his basement after a huricane......very lucky man he woke up in time to call 911 then passed out again........almost died
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 2:18:23 PM EST
Everything above plus use full synthetic oil after running it for a couple of hours under load with regular oil to break it in a little. Keep an extra spark plug and air filter handy. use a heavy dose of sta-bil just in case it doesn't get used for a while.
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 4:42:59 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/8/2007 4:45:01 PM EST by Skibane]
You may have shown her how to operate it, but that's no guarantee that she'll remember it when she needs it!

So, put it in writing: Photocopy the pertinent pages from the owner's manual, laminate them (optional), put them in a heavy-gauge plastic pouch, and zip-tie the pouch to the outside of the generator. Make sure that the instructions include info about adding oil (and what happens if you forget!), how and when to use the choke, how to disconnect all loads before starting or stopping the engine, etc. As previously mentioned, the info should also include a list of appliances that it will and won't be able to operate simultaneously.

Also, it would be good to have all essential generator accessories packaged together, and stored next to the generator - things like a fuel siphon and small gas can, several quarts of oil, one or two long, heavy-gauge extension cords and half a dozen shorter ones, a theft-resistant cable and padlock (if the generator will be operated in a location that is prone to theft), and a small fire extinguisher.

Next, make sure she knows how to siphon gas out of the family vehicles - and then make sure your siphon actually works with your vehicles!

In short, buying a generator is like buying a firearm - Without accessories and preparation, it's not much use.
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 5:09:19 PM EST

Originally Posted By Skibane:
You may have shown her how to operate it, but that's no guarantee that she'll remember it when she needs it!

So, put it in writing: Photocopy the pertinent pages from the owner's manual, laminate them (optional), put them in a heavy-gauge plastic pouch, and zip-tie the pouch to the outside of the generator. Make sure that the instructions include info about adding oil (and what happens if you forget!), how and when to use the choke, how to disconnect all loads before starting or stopping the engine, etc. As previously mentioned, the info should also include a list of appliances that it will and won't be able to operate simultaneously.

Also, it would be good to have all essential generator accessories packaged together, and stored next to the generator - things like a fuel siphon and small gas can, several quarts of oil, one or two long, heavy-gauge extension cords and half a dozen shorter ones, a theft-resistant cable and padlock (if the generator will be operated in a location that is prone to theft), and a small fire extinguisher.

Next, make sure she knows how to siphon gas out of the family vehicles - and then make sure your siphon actually works with your vehicles!

In short, buying a generator is like buying a firearm - Without accessories and preparation, it's not much use.


Good info. As far as what appliances can be run together, make it simple for her
(and yourself) make a spreadsheet with the load in watts that each appliance uses.
Then one could easily see at a glance what could be run together. Don't forget the start up draw of any unit with a motor (HVAC, washer etc.) I'd also get a manual transfer switch and have all the circuit breakers labeled. That way one
could add or subtract the loads easily.

Our prayers are with you and yours while you are in Iraq.
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 5:52:43 PM EST

Originally Posted By Skibane:
You may have shown her how to operate it, but that's no guarantee that she'll remember it when she needs it!

So, put it in writing: Photocopy the pertinent pages from the owner's manual, laminate them (optional), put them in a heavy-gauge plastic pouch, and zip-tie the pouch to the outside of the generator. Make sure that the instructions include info about adding oil (and what happens if you forget!), how and when to use the choke, how to disconnect all loads before starting or stopping the engine, etc. As previously mentioned, the info should also include a list of appliances that it will and won't be able to operate simultaneously.

Also, it would be good to have all essential generator accessories packaged together, and stored next to the generator - things like a fuel siphon and small gas can, several quarts of oil, one or two long, heavy-gauge extension cords and half a dozen shorter ones, a theft-resistant cable and padlock (if the generator will be operated in a location that is prone to theft), and a small fire extinguisher.

Next, make sure she knows how to siphon gas out of the family vehicles - and then make sure your siphon actually works with your vehicles!

In short, buying a generator is like buying a firearm - Without accessories and preparation, it's not much use.


Excellent stuff thanks!
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