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Posted: 7/17/2008 8:05:50 PM EST
Ive seen alot of people's preps on here and alot of talk about it etc but i have never seen anyone speak for the wonders of having plenty salt in their preps. This is very strange considering it could be worth its weight in gold as a preservative for storing foodstuffs. As you know people used to get paid in salt (Salary comes from the latin root for salt) because with it it brought wealth in being able to store food for long periods and then sold in tight times. This is even more concerning because many on the forum live nowhere near the sea where they could potentially harvest some of their own.

If you can shoot your own meat or grow your own how do you intend to store the meat (considering power is off) when the hunting season reaps a decent bounty? Salting the meat and storing it in containers keeps it for a few years and saves the hassle of going out hunting often which could endanger you more often to hostile others. This would also give less stress on your power supply if you were running refridgeration on fossil fuels.

Salt mixed with water gives you brine which is perfect for storing vegetables in. In fact all you need is a big food grade drum and you can shove your vegetables in WHOLE and they will keep for quite a while. Also salting and drying fish keeps it edible for quite a while after it is rehydrated back.

Salt is cheap!!!! and 500 pounds of it would cost you less than $150 but it has the potential to be enough food preservative for a whole family for an ENTIRE LIFETIME! It has medicinal properties too on cuts too and can be traded for 100 times its current price in SHTF times maybe more. Its easy to store, cheap and a good investment as a handful of it can preserve 80 times its weight in food!


Is it underestimated? I think it is.
Link Posted: 7/17/2008 8:55:30 PM EST
50# iodized salt lick blocks are about $7 each. Looking at 4 of them.
Link Posted: 7/17/2008 10:06:55 PM EST
Yes it is underestimated.
Link Posted: 7/17/2008 10:13:17 PM EST
I think a lot of people underestimate it because it's so readily available(and so cheap) nowadays, and because most people eat mostly store-bought food. Most people get more than enough salt in all the processed food they eat, and don't invest much time or effort in processing food for storage.
Link Posted: 7/17/2008 10:26:22 PM EST

Originally Posted By FourDeuce:
I think a lot of people underestimate it because it's so readily available(and so cheap) nowadays, and because most people eat mostly store-bought food. Most people get more than enough salt in all the processed food they eat, and don't invest much time or effort in processing food for storage.



Yeah but alot of you guys overlook it too and even buy unprocessed wheat and it makes perfect sense to have it in plentyful supply for people with this readiness mindset. I make my own prosciutto (cured ham) with it and always have 100kg on hand at least and im not exactly waiting for the zombies to roll into town .
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 12:09:12 AM EST
you can get those round boxes of iodized table salt at Walmart 3/$1
14 will fit in a 5 gallon bucket withroom to spare...
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 1:29:36 AM EST
most here dont have enough of anything let alone salt.
imho its one item thats still cheap that can be had and is stupid simple to stock and store. ive got near 150lbs of it myself....at 3-5$ per 25lb bag....it dont take much.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 1:58:59 AM EST
Gordon Foods has 25# bags for $3-4
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 2:04:28 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 2:59:03 AM EST
Sam's has Mortons IODIZED salt- 4lb. boxes ( 12 to a case =48lbs ) for less than 12 bucks.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 3:03:15 AM EST
If you're near the coast, it may be possible to make a little evaporation pond to get sea salt. They used to do that somewhere in the Caribbean. Probably pretty time-intensive though.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 3:46:12 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 5:36:02 AM EST

Originally Posted By fundummy:
Sam's has Mortons IODIZED salt- 4lb. boxes ( 12 to a case =48lbs ) for less than 12 bucks.

good deal on those boxes, my local sams didn't have it. last night i bought 25lbs in a bag for $9. same price for 25lbs of sugar.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 6:01:34 AM EST
I am not so sure it is underestimated as much as not discussed. I personally have a couple hundrde pounds and like other things I add to the supply monthly.
Since my wife has an allergy to Iodine I try and keep both Iodized and non in the stash.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 7:07:30 AM EST
Thanks for the heads up I now need to get a few cases of salt.

Some much stuff to do so little time.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 7:24:47 AM EST
Ok all... lets play help the uneducated... I'm totally clueless when it comes to salt and the many benefits. I live in the suburbs, will not be hunting in a SHTF situation... so where will salt come into my preps ? I do however have a freezer full of meat... lets say the SHTF and we have no power... I can store this meat in salt ? And it will keep in room temperature as long as its in salt ? Any specific type of salt ? So if I took my worthless freezer or some kind of container filled it with salt... threw the meat in it... whammo... meat will stay preserved for ..... x amount of time ?

Does this work with cooked meats ? Does this work with anything other than meats and vegetables ? Say like Fruits ?

Help... If I should have salt in my supplies than I'll run out and grab some !

Thanks gang !

Camm
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 7:30:56 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/18/2008 7:31:47 AM EST by OhioLibertarian]
cammsplace - a strong brine solution will help preserve vegetables (salt pickling)

Salt is used to make dried meat for preserving by taking the thawed meat and rubbing it with salt pellets until it penetrates all parts of it heavily.
It helps keep the meat surface unfriendly to bacteria
And this only works for solid pieces of meat like steak/brisket/chops... it won't work for burger, sausage, etc.

It also needs to be in a dry place, covered from bugs but with access to air to dry the meat out. Perhaps someday soon I will do a tutorial.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 9:49:38 AM EST

Originally Posted By Cammsplace:
Ok all... lets play help the uneducated... I'm totally clueless when it comes to salt and the many benefits. I live in the suburbs, will not be hunting in a SHTF situation... so where will salt come into my preps ? I do however have a freezer full of meat... lets say the SHTF and we have no power... I can store this meat in salt ? And it will keep in room temperature as long as its in salt ? Any specific type of salt ? ...................................
Camm


I once took a 3 month sail and one of the things I put aboard was salt beef. IIRC, it was probably top round or some other lean cut. I cut it in strips and put it in a salt brine. I changed the brine once or twice and when it was ready I put it in a fresh brine in a large plastic jug. I began my sail in N Carolina in late January and sailed to Mobile. It never went bad and was not refrigerated. You DO have to soak it in fresh water before you use it.

You couldn't just dump salt in your freezer. In the old days hogs were slaughtered and processed using salt, but this was done in the late fall in cooler temps. The following year as the temps rose the meat would be consumed.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 11:15:24 AM EST
Salt was very valuable in the Roman days. The Romans used slaves to mine salt.

The word "salary" was derived from the word meaning salt.

From the days when salt was used for payment:
"You are not worth your salt"
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 11:23:25 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 5:05:03 PM EST
Aren't you suppose to avoid iodized salt for curing/brining foods? My memory is probably failing or it might just be a taste issue related to the iodine.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 5:23:44 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/18/2008 5:30:09 PM EST by 45stops-em-quick]

Originally Posted By billyhill:
Aren't you suppose to avoid iodized salt for curing/brining foods? My memory is probably failing or it might just be a taste issue related to the iodine.


Use only pure NaCl for curing, no iodine necessary. Iodine was added to salt as a way of keeping iodine in the midwesterner's diet a long time ago. It's not good for curing meats, although studies have concluded that it won't affect taste or preservation. The anticaking agents in table salt will make your food taste saltier than it is though, so try to use pure salt if at all possible.

BTW You can salt cure sausages, that's what real salami is, a dry cured shelf stable sausage.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 7:51:57 PM EST

Originally Posted By Cammsplace:
Ok all... lets play help the uneducated... I'm totally clueless when it comes to salt and the many benefits. I live in the suburbs, will not be hunting in a SHTF situation... so where will salt come into my preps ? I do however have a freezer full of meat... lets say the SHTF and we have no power... I can store this meat in salt ? And it will keep in room temperature as long as its in salt ? Any specific type of salt ? So if I took my worthless freezer or some kind of container filled it with salt... threw the meat in it... whammo... meat will stay preserved for ..... x amount of time ?

Does this work with cooked meats ? Does this work with anything other than meats and vegetables ? Say like Fruits ?

Help... If I should have salt in my supplies than I'll run out and grab some !

Thanks gang !

Camm






This is salt cured pork. Its just the whole leg that has been stuck in a wooden barrel rubbed with salt and then buried in salt. After 3 weeks it is hung up in a room temperature room (cool but not refridgerated). To impart some more flavour you can smoke it for a smokeroom if you want.


You just cut slices off and eat with bread etc



Link Posted: 7/18/2008 7:59:04 PM EST

Originally Posted By billyhill:
Aren't you suppose to avoid iodized salt for curing/brining foods? My memory is probably failing or it might just be a taste issue related to the iodine.


That's for making pickles. They strongly recommend salt without iodine.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 8:19:16 PM EST
Iodine is completely unnecessary. Some people can also have or develop an allergic reaction to it. My mother believed that she had developed an allergy to shellfish rather late in life but it was the iodized salt she was cooking it with. She just uses natural sea salt now and no problems. It may be my imagination but I think natural salt tastes better too. Unfortunately you may have to search alittle harder to find sea salt in bulk.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 8:38:09 PM EST

Originally Posted By kaiserworks:
Iodine is completely unnecessary. Some people can also have or develop an allergic reaction to it. My mother believed that she had developed an allergy to shellfish rather late in life but it was the iodized salt she was cooking it with. She just uses natural sea salt now and no problems. It may be my imagination but I think natural salt tastes better too. Unfortunately you may have to search alittle harder to find sea salt in bulk.


Just buy rock salt and grind it as you need it.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 8:54:04 PM EST
Iodised salt
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Iodized salt)
Jump to: navigation, search

Iodised salt (AmE: iodized salt), table salt mixed with a minute amount of potassium iodide, sodium iodide or iodate, is used to help reduce the chance of iodine deficiency in humans. Iodine deficiency commonly leads to thyroid gland problems, specifically endemic goiter. Endemic goiter is a disease characterized by a swelling of the thyroid gland, usually resulting in a bulbous protrusion on the neck. While only tiny quantities of iodine are required in a diet to prevent goiter, the United States Food and Drug Administration recommends[1] 150 microgrammes of iodine per day for both men and women, and there are many places around the world where natural levels of iodine in the soil are low and the iodine is not taken up by vegetables.

Link Posted: 7/18/2008 9:30:55 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/18/2008 10:04:12 PM EST by GUNSFORHIRE]
I have been Salt brining to cure meats and other foods for years..
Here is a good read on the different types of Salts and how to use them..

every thing you ever wanted to know about salts

Pork Brining

Sugar Mtn

Another good read

Finally an AWESOME Resource

This book is priceless!

Morton's



1) Dry Curing: After applying the cure, place meat in a plastic food storage bag and tie end with a twist tie. For large cuts of meat and poultry, use large-size food storage bags which are available in most grocery stores. Do not use garbage bags.

2) Brine Curing: To prepare the brine, use non-corrosive bowls, such as plastic, glass or stainless steel. Crocks work well, too, but will take up more space in the refrigerator. Prepare enough brine so that meat is fully submerged. Use a bowl or plate as a weight to keep meat fully immersed in the brine.

3) Meat cuts differ in thickness and amount of bone and fat which affect cure penetration rate. You may have to lengthen curing time if using a thicker cut than specified in a recipe.

4) Feel free to experiment with spices when curing to suit your family's taste. However, do not exceed the curing levels indicated in the recipes.

5) To eliminate guesswork, label and date meats before curing. We recommend labeling day and time the meat is to be removed from the cure.

6) If meat is too salty, soak or boil in water to remove excess salt. Next time, remember to rinse cured meat under running tap water to remove excess salt or reduce curing time slightly.

7) Cure meat in the refrigerator (36° - 40°F). At colder temperatures, meat will not cure properly. Warmer temperatures encourage growth of spoilage microorganisms.

8) After curing, meat and poultry are still raw and must be cooked before being eaten. For your convenience, most recipes include suggested cooking instructions. Should you decide to give a home-cured delicacy as a gift, let the recipient know if they need to cook it.

9. Cured meat turns a pink or reddish color when cooked. If meat is fully cured, it will be pink throughout the cut. For poultry, use a meat thermometer to determine doneness, as meat will appear light pink when fully cooked.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 12:19:03 AM EST
I have a boatload of Morton drums, at 50 cents per, it sells itself.

Seems to me that a certain brand of water softener salt might be a nice bulk buy, IF you knew which one didn't have softener additives, and was either al;ready granulated or easily crushed in a simple grinder.

Any suggestions?
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 12:30:40 AM EST

Originally Posted By jeffers_mz:
I have a boatload of Morton drums, at 50 cents per, it sells itself.

Seems to me that a certain brand of water softener salt might be a nice bulk buy, IF you knew which one didn't have softener additives, and was either al;ready granulated or easily crushed in a simple grinder.

Any suggestions?


Wonder the same thing when I see 50# bags at Sam's for a few bucks.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 4:11:14 AM EST
One reason I consider salt so valuable is because it's difficult to replace in many areas(if you don't have a society to provide it for you). If you don't live near a body of salt water or a salt mine, it might be hard to replace on your own.
Back in the pioneer days, the people had smokehouses where they hung meat to season after brining it. The salt would drip from the meat while it was hanging there. Salt was so valuable then that they would dig up the dirt from the smokehouse floor and boil it to extract the salt.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 7:52:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By GUNSFORHIRE:
I have been Salt brining to cure meats and other foods for years..
Here is a good read on the different types of Salts and how to use them..

every thing you ever wanted to know about salts

Pork Brining

Sugar Mtn

Another good read

Finally an AWESOME Resource

This book is priceless!

Morton's



1) Dry Curing: After applying the cure, place meat in a plastic food storage bag and tie end with a twist tie. For large cuts of meat and poultry, use large-size food storage bags which are available in most grocery stores. Do not use garbage bags.

2) Brine Curing: To prepare the brine, use non-corrosive bowls, such as plastic, glass or stainless steel. Crocks work well, too, but will take up more space in the refrigerator. Prepare enough brine so that meat is fully submerged. Use a bowl or plate as a weight to keep meat fully immersed in the brine.

3) Meat cuts differ in thickness and amount of bone and fat which affect cure penetration rate. You may have to lengthen curing time if using a thicker cut than specified in a recipe.

4) Feel free to experiment with spices when curing to suit your family's taste. However, do not exceed the curing levels indicated in the recipes.

5) To eliminate guesswork, label and date meats before curing. We recommend labeling day and time the meat is to be removed from the cure.

6) If meat is too salty, soak or boil in water to remove excess salt. Next time, remember to rinse cured meat under running tap water to remove excess salt or reduce curing time slightly.

7) Cure meat in the refrigerator (36° - 40°F). At colder temperatures, meat will not cure properly. Warmer temperatures encourage growth of spoilage microorganisms.

8) After curing, meat and poultry are still raw and must be cooked before being eaten. For your convenience, most recipes include suggested cooking instructions. Should you decide to give a home-cured delicacy as a gift, let the recipient know if they need to cook it.

9. Cured meat turns a pink or reddish color when cooked. If meat is fully cured, it will be pink throughout the cut. For poultry, use a meat thermometer to determine doneness, as meat will appear light pink when fully cooked.



Thanks Guns, great stuff.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 8:34:36 AM EST

Originally Posted By EXPY37:

Originally Posted By jeffers_mz:
I have a boatload of Morton drums, at 50 cents per, it sells itself.

Seems to me that a certain brand of water softener salt might be a nice bulk buy, IF you knew which one didn't have softener additives, and was either al;ready granulated or easily crushed in a simple grinder.

Any suggestions?


Wonder the same thing when I see 50# bags at Sam's for a few bucks.


Thought the same thing.

I wonder if they have salt at the local feed store?
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:00:58 AM EST
I started storing some salt after reading ALAS BABYLON. If you remember, salt was an item the main characters needed badly in order to survive.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:09:36 AM EST
I keep salt in the pantry, and a 50# bag with my prep foods. You are right in feeling that many people don't even think about salt. Same with TP too. :)
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:27:44 AM EST
I got 100 pounds of it from Costco. I think it was $3 and change for a 25 lb bag. 50lbs of salt fills a 5 gallon bucket very nicely.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:56:29 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:37:02 AM EST
I have a few hundred pounds (thanks Costco!) it makes food taste better, and in a pinch it can be used to preserve


I like salt, my Doctor hates me liking it though
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 11:30:47 AM EST
Gee, I've probably got ten to twelve pounds of the stuff, which I thought was more than enough for a lifetime.

I guess it's cheap and should be stacked deep.

John
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 2:10:18 PM EST
Is the salt you use to melt snow safe to consume?

I can get the 50lb yellow bags that say Halite on them, the bag says NaCl (and not KCl or CaCl).

If not, I guess I can just go to Sam's one of these days and fill up my buckets. Jewel Foods gave me a bunch of foodgrade buckets for free (bakery icing and olives/pickles).

Been a lurker for ages, hello and thanks to everyone for their knowledge.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 8:10:13 AM EST
In the Middle ages Salt and Pepper where traded in equal weight amounts for GOLD.
Yes it is underrated.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 7:45:49 PM EST

Originally Posted By sodacansniper:
Is the salt you use to melt snow safe to consume?

I can get the 50lb yellow bags that say Halite on them, the bag says NaCl (and not KCl or CaCl).

If not, I guess I can just go to Sam's one of these days and fill up my buckets. Jewel Foods gave me a bunch of foodgrade buckets for free (bakery icing and olives/pickles).

Been a lurker for ages, hello and thanks to everyone for their knowledge.


Welcome aboard
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 5:48:33 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/22/2008 9:53:28 AM EST by Mid-Tenn]

Originally Posted By protus:
most here dont have enough of anything let alone salt.



Much truth in that statement.


What's an ideal amount?

How accurate are the LDS food calculator recomendations in the suggested amount per person?
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 6:11:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By Mid-Tenn:

Originally Posted By protus:
most here dont have enough of anything let alone salt.



Much truth in that statement.


What's an ideal amount?

How accurate are the LDS food calculator recomendations in the suggested ammount per person?


i've never heard or read anybody dispute the LDS recommendations. i've seen their calculator duplicated exactly on many many websites. of course this doesn't mean it's perfect. i think the official church site states that their calculations are only recommendations and you should adjust it based on your family. if, for example, you do a lot of manual labor outside, then i have read you should adjust the amounts up by 15%, which is what my wife and i have done.

btw, this older calculator recommends 5lbs per person. i believe this would be for consumption only. if you planned on curring meat, or using it for other things, then obviously you'd need a whole lot more. my opinion is, it's cheap and easy to store so might as well have plenty. if TSHTF, then it'll likely be a very valuable trading commodity.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 8:57:41 AM EST

Originally Posted By Bobmeister:

Originally Posted By kaiserworks:
Iodine is completely unnecessary. Some people can also have or develop an allergic reaction to it. My mother believed that she had developed an allergy to shellfish rather late in life but it was the iodized salt she was cooking it with. She just uses natural sea salt now and no problems. It may be my imagination but I think natural salt tastes better too. Unfortunately you may have to search alittle harder to find sea salt in bulk.


Just buy rock salt and grind it as you need it.


Check the box before you load up. I noticed a warning on some rock salt we were using to make ice cream that said not to ingest it.

(Maybe eating Vegamite immunizes Aussies!)
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