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Posted: 9/17/2018 11:48:53 AM EDT
I have been thinking it is time to purchase a good tent for backpacking, and bike camping. I don't like bright colors. I prefer earth tones, because you never know when you might decide you need to do some "stealth camping". I am thinking about getting one of these What other tents should I be considering? I typically will be sleeping in it by myself, but I would like a tent big enough for 2 people. You never know when I might find a lady to join me. I am 5'6" tall, so I take up less room than some folks.
Link Posted: 9/17/2018 12:01:28 PM EDT
I'd add Tarptent to your list. I have a Hogback that is great for the family.
I also like my Big Agnes Copper Spur's (I have two), but you may not like the orange color...
Link Posted: 9/17/2018 12:52:49 PM EDT
I have a Marmot Limelight 2 and a 3. Like th month a lot and they go up fast and easy. The dark green color really blends nicely into the environment.
Link Posted: 9/17/2018 2:06:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/17/2018 2:07:52 PM EDT by StraightMiataMan]
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Originally Posted By DV8EDD:
I have a Marmot Limelight 2 and a 3. Like th month a lot and they go up fast and easy. The dark green color really blends nicely into the environment.
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I have one of the older bright orange Marmot Limelight 2's. Love that tent, dragged it all around boyscouts and philmont, never once has it let me down.

OP, if you want to do "stealth camping," then cover it with a tarp and local plant life. If you're using it for any other uses, not only is the bright color nice to find your way back to it, but it's also a safety thing in case SAR needs to find you.
Link Posted: 9/17/2018 9:07:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/17/2018 9:08:30 PM EDT by ROCK6]
What's your budget? Silnylon is still a high quality tent material, but you need to make sure you have the netted interior or plenty of ventilation (same with Dyneema fabric). Along with Tarptent (which I own two), Six Moons, Mountain Laurel, and ZPacks are all top-end cottage makers. ZPacks uses the camo Dyneema fabric, which would really help with "stealth" camping. And yes, low-profile camping and site selection is a tenant of "Leave No Trace" (LNT). So, while many may hear "stealth" and think nefarious thoughts, setting up a low-profile site, out of sight from the trail, limiting damage to foliage, using light and noise discipline, along with muted colors is directly in-line with the more acceptable outdoors ethics being taught.

ROCK6
Link Posted: 9/17/2018 10:29:53 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/17/2018 10:31:56 PM EDT by Iram]
I'm a big fan of the Kelty Trailogic TN2. It's not ultralight, but it's light. Things like larger (stronger) zippers, thicker material, free-standing without trekking poles, etc., all add weight. Color isn't camouflage, but it's also not super bright either. I got mine for $200, and spent several nights in it along with hiking to the top of a mountain. Very spacious for a 2-person backpacking tent.

When I was shopping, the other three tents that were "frontrunners" (after looking at specs on nearly two dozen tents in a big spreadsheet) were the REI Halfdome, Marmot Tungstun UL (not the non-UL version), and the Big Agnes Rattlesnake SL.

If you've never gone camping before, think about buying something cheap like a Kelty Salida ($120 or so) and just go camp, even in your back yard, local campgrounds, etc., a few times to figure out what you want and don't want in a tent. People seem to have lots of good ideas when they're sitting at a keyboard in a warm house, but most of those great ideas don't work in the rain when it's 35 degrees out, raining, and you're hearing wild animals you can't identify in the dark...

---------

ETA: Since you mentioned a "lady", I proposed in a Kelty TN2 at about 9200 feet above sea level. She said yes.
Link Posted: 9/17/2018 11:14:25 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By ROCK6:
What's your budget? Silnylon is still a high quality tent material, but you need to make sure you have the netted interior or plenty of ventilation (same with Dyneema fabric). Along with Tarptent (which I own two), Six Moons, Mountain Laurel, and ZPacks are all top-end cottage makers. ZPacks uses the camo Dyneema fabric, which would really help with "stealth" camping. And yes, low-profile camping and site selection is a tenant of "Leave No Trace" (LNT). So, while many may hear "stealth" and think nefarious thoughts, setting up a low-profile site, out of sight from the trail, limiting damage to foliage, using light and noise discipline, along with muted colors is directly in-line with the more acceptable outdoors ethics being taught.

ROCK6
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I would like to spend less than $300. I will look into the tents you mentioned.
Link Posted: 9/18/2018 12:37:23 AM EDT
6 moons trekker 1p, 240.00..weight 27ounces.
Link Posted: 9/18/2018 5:44:57 PM EDT
I’m a Big Agnes fan. I did a lot of research and went with the Rattlesnake. Copper Spur is good too, I just wanted tougher material. I looked hard at the tarptents etc. was going to Philmont. I have not used one but read a lot about condensation issues. I’m happy with my choice and believe it or not, the mountain glow is amazing and very useful.
Link Posted: 9/21/2018 6:20:08 PM EDT
Sierra Designs makes fantastic tents at good prices. I'd definitely recommend taking a look. REI brand tents are also pretty good for the money.
Link Posted: 9/22/2018 11:39:11 AM EDT
Not sure what "stealth camping" might be, but I wouldn't prioritize that aspect too greatly.

Performance, weight, reliability.

I have the Big Agnes UL1 and it's never failed me.

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Link Posted: 9/23/2018 12:04:33 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/23/2018 12:10:56 AM EDT by ROCK6]
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Originally Posted By Mainsail:
Not sure what "stealth camping" might be, but I wouldn't prioritize that aspect too greatly.
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Originally Posted By Mainsail:
Not sure what "stealth camping" might be, but I wouldn't prioritize that aspect too greatly.
I know "stealth camping" is misunderstood as many think of it as something mall-ninja tactical or something nefarious/illegal. When we did our Leave No Trace certification program, the principles of LNT when it came to site selection, your actions, and even color choices, all pretty much reminded me of the TTPs we used during patrolling in the early part of my military career. LNT can be a little retarded or even simply common-sense, but the aspects of keeping a low profile for both minimizing impacts to the environment or just adhering to basic noise and light discipline along with muted colors to "respect" others' outdoor experiences are pretty much the same principles I would use for patrolling. So, I avoid the term "stealth camping" and utilize the term "LNT site selection"

I pulled these from the LNT site:

Avoid camping close to water and trails and select a site which is not visible to others. When selecting a campsite, choose a site where rocks or trees will screen it from others view. Keep noise down in camp so not to disturb other campers or those passing by on the trail.

In pristine sites it is best to spread out tents, avoid repetitive traffic routes, and move camp every night. The objective is to minimize the number of times any part of the site is trampled. In setting up camp, disperse tents and the kitchen on durable sites. Wear soft shoes around camp. Minimize activity around the kitchen and places where packs are stashed. The durable surfaces of large rock slabs make good kitchen sites. Watch where you walk to avoid crushing vegetation and take alternate paths to water. Minimize the number of trips to water by carrying water containers. Check regulations, but camping 200 feet (70 adult steps) from water is a good rule of thumb.

When breaking camp, take time to naturalize the site. Covering scuffed areas with native materials (such as pine needles), brushing out footprints, and raking matted grassy areas with a stick will help the site recover and make it less obvious as a campsite. This extra effort will help hide any indication where you camped and make it less likely that other backcountry travelers will camp in the same spot. The less often a pristine campsite is used the better chance it has of remaining pristine.

Bright clothing and equipment, such as tents can be seen for long distances are discouraged. Especially in open natural areas, colors such as day-glow yellow are disturbing and contribute to a crowded feeling; choose earth-toned colors (ie. browns and greens) to lessen visual impacts.
We had a wildlife biologist in our group and he also brought up another impact from bright colors. Aside from the non-tactical look, bright colors also disturb local fauna, often disrupting feeding and mating as the bright colors often represent danger or threats. I don't know if there is definitive science behind that hypothesis, but it sounds more likely than not. On the other side, my wife does hike with bright cloths when she's backpacking alone; both to serve as easier to see attire and yes, possibly scare off potential threats...again, not a proven practice, but I can see both sides of the debate...safety will always trump the feelings of a red-cockaded woodpecker in mating season...

ROCK6
Link Posted: 9/23/2018 12:36:31 AM EDT
I use a Titanium Goat Vertex 5 for my solo hunting adventures. It weighs in at 26.5oz and I use a trekking pole for the center.

It’s big enough for 2, but not with a ton of other gear. It’s right on the top end of your budget though.

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Link Posted: 9/23/2018 1:58:38 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By pagoda:
I'd add Tarptent to your list. I have a Hogback that is great for the family.
I also like my Big Agnes Copper Spur's (I have two), but you may not like the orange color...
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I have a Tarptent as well. Great tent that weighs nothing.
Link Posted: 9/23/2018 10:16:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/23/2018 10:18:29 AM EDT by Mainsail]
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Originally Posted By ROCK6: LNT can be a little retarded or even simply common-sense, but the aspects of keeping a low profile for both minimizing impacts to the environment or just adhering to basic noise and light discipline along with muted colors to "respect" others' outdoor experiences...
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Originally Posted By ROCK6: LNT can be a little retarded or even simply common-sense, but the aspects of keeping a low profile for both minimizing impacts to the environment or just adhering to basic noise and light discipline along with muted colors to "respect" others' outdoor experiences...
OK, I get that. So for the OP it may likely apply. The Big Agnes I posted has muted colors; not stealth but not the "bright colors" the OP wants to avoid. Since I do not set up my tent in campgrounds or anywhere anyone else would ever see it, it works great. I think my suggestion fails though because I just now looked up the tent to see what the weight is and noticed the MSRP- ouch! I used a military discount and don't remember how much I paid, but nowhere near that.

Originally Posted By GAZ32:I use a Titanium Goat Vertex 5 for my solo hunting adventures. It weighs in at 26.5oz and I use a trekking pole for the center. It’s big enough for 2, but not with a ton of other gear. It’s right on the top end of your budget though.
I really like that! I still like a tent with a full floor for where I hike, it rains a bit here in the Pacific Northwet... The Big Agnes UL1 I posted weighs only a few ounces more.
Link Posted: 9/23/2018 11:44:27 PM EDT
I have an MSR Elixir 2 and I'm very happy with the build quality to cost ratio. I don't use it anymore though due to switching over to hammock camping. If your mostly solo camping, look into hammocks before spending money on tents. Sleeping on the ground is for suckers.

MSR Elixir


Link to hammock stuff <--LINKY
Link Posted: 9/24/2018 9:22:52 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Mainsail:
I really like that! I still like a tent with a full floor for where I hike, it rains a bit here in the Pacific Northwet... The Big Agnes UL1 I posted weighs only a few ounces more.
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Originally Posted By Mainsail:
Originally Posted By GAZ32:I use a Titanium Goat Vertex 5 for my solo hunting adventures. It weighs in at 26.5oz and I use a trekking pole for the center. It’s big enough for 2, but not with a ton of other gear. It’s right on the top end of your budget though.
I really like that! I still like a tent with a full floor for where I hike, it rains a bit here in the Pacific Northwet... The Big Agnes UL1 I posted weighs only a few ounces more.
Sometimes I'll take a 9'x9' plastic tarp as a groundcloth. It only weighs a few ounces more and takes up no space.

When I was in PA, it rained 5 inches in 36 hours and was completely dry the entire time.

What I like about the floorless tipi's is that I can add a stove. I haven't done that yet since TiGoat stoves are just as much or more than the tent
Link Posted: 9/24/2018 9:25:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/24/2018 9:26:48 AM EDT by Mainsail]
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Originally Posted By GAZ32:
Sometimes I'll take a 9'x9' plastic tarp as a groundcloth. It only weighs a few ounces more and takes up no space.

When I was in PA, it rained 5 inches in 36 hours and was completely dry the entire time.

What I like about the floorless tipi's is that I can add a stove. I haven't done that yet since TiGoat stoves are just as much or more than the tent
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Originally Posted By GAZ32:
Originally Posted By Mainsail:
Originally Posted By GAZ32:I use a Titanium Goat Vertex 5 for my solo hunting adventures. It weighs in at 26.5oz and I use a trekking pole for the center. It’s big enough for 2, but not with a ton of other gear. It’s right on the top end of your budget though.
I really like that! I still like a tent with a full floor for where I hike, it rains a bit here in the Pacific Northwet... The Big Agnes UL1 I posted weighs only a few ounces more.
Sometimes I'll take a 9'x9' plastic tarp as a groundcloth. It only weighs a few ounces more and takes up no space.

When I was in PA, it rained 5 inches in 36 hours and was completely dry the entire time.

What I like about the floorless tipi's is that I can add a stove. I haven't done that yet since TiGoat stoves are just as much or more than the tent
I like all the headroom you get with it.

I wasn't considering it raining when I was out, but that the ground was already wet when I set up. Keeping the crawly things out is a bonus.
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