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1/16/2020 9:48:49 PM
Posted: 9/11/2012 2:46:27 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/11/2012 2:47:34 AM EST by jukeboxx13]
So two weeks ago there was a couple earthquakes in Southern California where I live. They were not huge but enough to scare me and my wife. One happened at night right before bed, and when it went off I grabbed her and ran for the door frame. Then the next morning as we woke up another earthquake hit while we were in bed so we just stayed put. They both lasted about 10 seconds, and shook hard enough to the point where I almost fell when getting to the door frame. So anyways i found this article with tips about what to do in the event of an earthquake, oh and btw now my wife believes me about prepping.



Sorry but you guys will have to copy and paste.

http://earthquakecountry.info/dropcoverholdon/
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 3:47:35 AM EST
The picture of said wife is not loading...You know the rules.
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 3:51:36 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 2:41:29 PM EST
Originally Posted By safe1:
Originally Posted By Traderjac:
The picture of said wife is not loading...You know the rules.


This is not GD.

OP were you in the Imperial Valley?



No i was not.
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 5:36:17 PM EST
Originally Posted By jukeboxx13:
So two weeks ago there was a couple earthquakes in Southern California where I live. They were not huge but enough to scare me and my wife. One happened at night right before bed, and when it went off I grabbed her and ran for the door frame. Then the next morning as we woke up another earthquake hit while we were in bed so we just stayed put. They both lasted about 10 seconds, and shook hard enough to the point where I almost fell when getting to the door frame. So anyways i found this article with tips about what to do in the event of an earthquake, oh and btw now my wife believes me about prepping.



Sorry but you guys will have to copy and paste.

http://earthquakecountry.info/dropcoverholdon/

Link Posted: 9/11/2012 5:50:53 PM EST
not many earthquakes here in Ga. and you can own more cool guns maybe you should bug out
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 5:54:23 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/11/2012 6:00:17 PM EST by bantis]
Ive heard that the door frame is the worst place in an earthquake. Apparently the door frame will snap which would not be good if you are in the middle of it. I have no experience so what do I know.

Ive also heard that getting under things is a bad idea too. The thinking behind it is that if the building collapses, you will be smooshed. Rather you should get next to an object of size so that if the building collapses you will be in an air pocket and the said building might be stopped by the object you are next to.

But the idea behind getting under something is so that things above you wont land on you.
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 6:01:02 PM EST
don't sleep under windows. Keep heavy drapes over wondows. live in a building that is bolted to a concrete foundation. use a flexable gas pipe to your hater heater. know how to turn utilities off.
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 6:15:47 PM EST

Originally Posted By whiskerz:
not many earthquakes here in Ga. and you can own more cool guns maybe you should bug out

Again, this is not GD
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 7:49:03 PM EST
Originally Posted By bantis:
. Rather you should get next to an object of size so that if the building collapses you will be in an air pocket and the said building might be stopped by the object you are next to.


This has been proven wrong many times over, is terrible advice.

From what I've learned after living through 10,000+ aftershocks in the last two years:

1. Candles/Lanterns are house fires waiting to happen - buy some LED lighting.
2. Having spare boards/timber under the house is perfect for covering smashed windows for a few months until you can get a glazier to repair them
3. before you touch anything after a big quake, photograph every room wall to wall - insurance companies are evil
4. when a big container of water spoils you lose a lot more than multiple small containers
5. don't travel in a hurry, 250,000 people trying to get out at the same time doesn't work
6. don't live on a landlocked island...
7. don't tailgate

Hmm, I could go on all day with tips, the above are pretty much the essentials...
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 7:49:59 PM EST
Originally Posted By readyornot:
don't sleep under windows. Keep heavy drapes over wondows. live in a building that is bolted to a concrete foundation. use a flexable gas pipe to your hater heater. know how to turn utilities off.


^^^ oh yeah, these are great tips too - our curtains got shredded something fierce when the windows let go.
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 7:55:53 PM EST
Originally Posted By nvhunter:
Originally Posted By jukeboxx13:
So two weeks ago there was a couple earthquakes in Southern California where I live. They were not huge but enough to scare me and my wife. One happened at night right before bed, and when it went off I grabbed her and ran for the door frame. Then the next morning as we woke up another earthquake hit while we were in bed so we just stayed put. They both lasted about 10 seconds, and shook hard enough to the point where I almost fell when getting to the door frame. So anyways i found this article with tips about what to do in the event of an earthquake, oh and btw now my wife believes me about prepping.



Sorry but you guys will have to copy and paste.

http://earthquakecountry.info/dropcoverholdon/



thanks
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 7:56:44 PM EST
Originally Posted By whiskerz:
not many earthquakes here in Ga. and you can own more cool guns maybe you should bug out


I do have family in GA, but what kind of natural disasters occur over there?
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 7:57:43 PM EST
Originally Posted By bantis:
Ive heard that the door frame is the worst place in an earthquake. Apparently the door frame will snap which would not be good if you are in the middle of it. I have no experience so what do I know.

Ive also heard that getting under things is a bad idea too. The thinking behind it is that if the building collapses, you will be smooshed. Rather you should get next to an object of size so that if the building collapses you will be in an air pocket and the said building might be stopped by the object you are next to.

But the idea behind getting under something is so that things above you wont land on you.


Yea the article explains a lot about what you have posted. thanks for the reply.
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 7:58:42 PM EST
Originally Posted By readyornot:
don't sleep under windows. Keep heavy drapes over wondows. live in a building that is bolted to a concrete foundation. use a flexable gas pipe to your hater heater. know how to turn utilities off.


Flexible gas pipes sounds good, will do more research on that. thanks
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 8:00:27 PM EST
Originally Posted By Monsterbishi:
Originally Posted By bantis:
. Rather you should get next to an object of size so that if the building collapses you will be in an air pocket and the said building might be stopped by the object you are next to.


This has been proven wrong many times over, is terrible advice.

From what I've learned after living through 10,000+ aftershocks in the last two years:

1. Candles/Lanterns are house fires waiting to happen - buy some LED lighting.
2. Having spare boards/timber under the house is perfect for covering smashed windows for a few months until you can get a glazier to repair them
3. before you touch anything after a big quake, photograph every room wall to wall - insurance companies are evil
4. when a big container of water spoils you lose a lot more than multiple small containers
5. don't travel in a hurry, 250,000 people trying to get out at the same time doesn't work
6. don't live on a landlocked island...
7. don't tailgate

Hmm, I could go on all day with tips, the above are pretty much the essentials...


Insurance company's are evil, but first i need to get insurance.lol. thanks for the tips.
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 8:02:24 PM EST
Originally Posted By jukeboxx13:
Originally Posted By readyornot:
don't sleep under windows. Keep heavy drapes over wondows. live in a building that is bolted to a concrete foundation. use a flexable gas pipe to your hater heater. know how to turn utilities off.


Flexible gas pipes sounds good, will do more research on that. thanks


They have been a code requirement for a long time in CA so you probably alrady have it. Make sure your water heater is properly strapped to the wall too.
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 8:18:46 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/11/2012 8:18:53 PM EST by jukeboxx13]
Originally Posted By readyornot:
Originally Posted By jukeboxx13:
Originally Posted By readyornot:
don't sleep under windows. Keep heavy drapes over wondows. live in a building that is bolted to a concrete foundation. use a flexable gas pipe to your hater heater. know how to turn utilities off.


Flexible gas pipes sounds good, will do more research on that. thanks


They have been a code requirement for a long time in CA so you probably alrady have it. Make sure your water heater is properly strapped to the wall too.


Better double check. thanks
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 8:23:40 PM EST
Originally Posted By readyornot:
Originally Posted By jukeboxx13:
Originally Posted By readyornot:
don't sleep under windows. Keep heavy drapes over wondows. live in a building that is bolted to a concrete foundation. use a flexable gas pipe to your hater heater. know how to turn utilities off.


Flexible gas pipes sounds good, will do more research on that. thanks


They have been a code requirement for a long time in CA so you probably alrady have it. Make sure your water heater is properly strapped to the wall too.


Seismic gas shut-off valves are also pretty common in that part of the country.
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 8:53:03 PM EST
A note on homeowner's insurance in California: Most policies don't cover earthquakes. If you own a home and have insurance, you might wish to check.

Earthquake insurance is available through the California Earthquake Authority...but it's expensive.

I may be cancelling mine...I don't know. I just found out my deductible is $50K for a $200K home.
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 9:33:30 PM EST
Originally Posted By Sixtigers:
A note on homeowner's insurance in California: Most policies don't cover earthquakes. If you own a home and have insurance, you might wish to check.

Earthquake insurance is available through the California Earthquake Authority...but it's expensive.

I may be cancelling mine...I don't know. I just found out my deductible is $50K for a $200K home.


Dang that's a lot for your home, and i am still new at all this home owner stuff.. well thanks for the reply.
Link Posted: 9/11/2012 9:58:53 PM EST
[span style='font-weight: bold;']I may be cancelling mine...I don't know. I just found out my deductible is $50K for a $200K home.


How much are your premiums in comparison? ie - how many years would it take you to save enough money to say, have the foundations repaired? or do you have a plan if your regional building regulations are modified after a significant event?
Link Posted: 9/12/2012 1:03:12 AM EST
Originally Posted By Sixtigers:
A note on homeowner's insurance in California: Most policies don't cover earthquakes. If you own a home and have insurance, you might wish to check.

Earthquake insurance is available through the California Earthquake Authority...but it's expensive.

I may be cancelling mine...I don't know. I just found out my deductible is $50K for a $200K home.


Interesting factoid about the Great San Francisco Quake of 1906:

Due to a widespread practice by insurers to indemnify San Francisco properties from fire, but not earthquake damage, most of the destruction in the city was blamed on the fires. Some property owners deliberately set fire to damaged properties, in order to claim them on their insurance. Capt. Leonard D. Wildman of the U.S. Army Signal Corps[23] reported that he "was stopped by a fireman who told me that people in that neighborhood were firing their houses… they were told that they would not get their insurance on buildings damaged by the earthquake unless they were damaged by fire."]
Link Posted: 9/12/2012 2:56:27 AM EST
Their interpretation of "the triangle of life" is different than mine. I remember reading somewhere that after the Loma Prieta quake that quite a few survivors were found trapped but unhurt in corner areas of buildings. In many placed the roofs collapsed, but did not pancake. The center of the roofs collapsed, but the edges stayed connected to the corners becoming a triangular pocket where people were found alive. That is what I consider the triangle of life.
Link Posted: 9/12/2012 4:26:39 AM EST
Originally Posted By Monsterbishi:
[span style='font-weight: bold;']I may be cancelling mine...I don't know. I just found out my deductible is $50K for a $200K home.


How much are your premiums in comparison? ie - how many years would it take you to save enough money to say, have the foundations repaired? or do you have a plan if your regional building regulations are modified after a significant event?


I have no plan. I make enough to take care of the mortgage, and feed the kids and cars.

There isn't much left over.

Link Posted: 9/12/2012 5:54:33 AM EST
OP, you're in CA according to your profile. There's a history of that state having seismic activity.

You asked what natural disasters we get out here... we don't normally have to deal with earthquakes although there is a massive underground fault line running through Charleston Sc... it's about 200 miles down but still...

Out there you've got earthquakes and wildfires, mud slides and El Nino and La Nina... out here, we've got hurricanes and storm surge, tropical storms and flooding, pop up thunderstorms, tornadoes, lightning, and ice storms.

Prepping for all of the above is a good thing but like was mentioned... 250,000 people evacuating the area doesn't work well nor does it work quickly. A hurricane evacation a few years ago of parts of Florida resulted in people being stuck in traffic for 16 hours... right as the hurricane passed overhead while they were in their vehicles.

The only thing I can suggest for earthquakes is to know how to turn off utilities... power, water, gas. The Coalinga quake devastated its area. The NorthRidge quake devastated its area... these are just 2 major quakes that hit your within the past few decades...
Link Posted: 9/12/2012 6:23:09 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/14/2012 11:28:36 AM EST by Ranchhand365]
Link Posted: 9/13/2012 5:13:09 AM EST
Originally Posted By Ras_Thavas:
Their interpretation of "the triangle of life" is different than mine. I remember reading somewhere that after the Loma Prieta quake that quite a few survivors were found trapped but unhurt in corner areas of buildings. In many placed the roofs collapsed, but did not pancake. The center of the roofs collapsed, but the edges stayed connected to the corners becoming a triangular pocket where people were found alive. That is what I consider the triangle of life.


Thanks will look into it some more.
Link Posted: 9/13/2012 5:15:27 AM EST
Originally Posted By scorpion12:
OP, you're in CA according to your profile. There's a history of that state having seismic activity.

You asked what natural disasters we get out here... we don't normally have to deal with earthquakes although there is a massive underground fault line running through Charleston Sc... it's about 200 miles down but still...

Out there you've got earthquakes and wildfires, mud slides and El Nino and La Nina... out here, we've got hurricanes and storm surge, tropical storms and flooding, pop up thunderstorms, tornadoes, lightning, and ice storms.

Prepping for all of the above is a good thing but like was mentioned... 250,000 people evacuating the area doesn't work well nor does it work quickly. A hurricane evacation a few years ago of parts of Florida resulted in people being stuck in traffic for 16 hours... right as the hurricane passed overhead while they were in their vehicles.

The only thing I can suggest for earthquakes is to know how to turn off utilities... power, water, gas. The Coalinga quake devastated its area. The NorthRidge quake devastated its area... these are just 2 major quakes that hit your within the past few decades...


Yea there is most likely another coming soon to so cal or nor cal. thanks for the reply, and i will learn to turn off everything
Link Posted: 9/13/2012 1:15:08 PM EST
Drop, cover, hold on. Sounds like the "drop drills" we did in school when I was a kid. Like dropping and covering you head would keep you from being incinerated when the nuke went off. Drop, cover and hold on will likely only result in folks being found in a kneeling position when the roof debris is removed from their bodies. But, I'm sure it gives someone a warm and fuzzy feeling.

It's likely about as much good as the, now poo pooed, idea of standing in a door way. If the roof caves in, your body posiiton is unimportant, only luck counts. So whether you're standing in the door way, kneeling on the floor (though a good place to pray) or waltzing around the room, it's a crap shoot and you aren't even rolling the dice.
Link Posted: 9/13/2012 1:32:25 PM EST
Unless you're in imminent danger of the building falling down around you, you're best off trying not to move around much while the quake is happening. Lotta injuries occur by trying to unass your house while the floor is trying to unass from the ground.

Wait it out in a corner, preferably not an interior wall. As soon as it calms enough to get outside, do so. Keep slip on shoes and a fire extinguisher near the bed. Keep a bug out bag of some sort in the bedroom that you can grab on your way out the door. Don't hang pictures, knick knacks, or other hard and pointy objects up in the bedroom if you can avoid it, and definitely nothing over the bed.

Don't go back into the house after the quake until you've had a chance to shut down all utilities, have assessed it for damage and found it to be undamaged, and unless you really, really need to. Quakes often have fore and aftershocks, the 5.3 that just ran you out of the house at 2AM may be a fore shock for the 7.2 that hits a 4AM.

And, for the love of all that is holy, watch out for graboids.



Link Posted: 9/18/2012 8:48:52 PM EST
Anyone else have any helpful tips or past experience. thanks
Link Posted: 9/18/2012 10:13:37 PM EST
Originally Posted By jeepnik:
Drop, cover, hold on. Sounds like the "drop drills" we did in school when I was a kid. Like dropping and covering you head would keep you from being incinerated when the nuke went off. Drop, cover and hold on will likely only result in folks being found in a kneeling position when the roof debris is removed from their bodies. But, I'm sure it gives someone a warm and fuzzy feeling.

It's likely about as much good as the, now poo pooed, idea of standing in a door way. If the roof caves in, your body posiiton is unimportant, only luck counts. So whether you're standing in the door way, kneeling on the floor (though a good place to pray) or waltzing around the room, it's a crap shoot and you aren't even rolling the dice.


You've never been in a proper (within 10miles of a mag 5.0, sub 10 miles depth) quake have you?

The drop, cover, hold is to get you in a position where you are more protected by falling/moving items, and it works.

Luck is for people who do nothing to shift the odds in their favour, like not standing in a doorway. There is some security footage of some folks in our September 2010 quakes(Peak mag 7.1) that have them in doorways as the whole front of the building dropped in front of them, then watching as they emerged from teh dust where the doorways still stood.

When we had the quakes here in feb 2011(Mag 6.3), the ground movement literally exceeded gravity itself, so the floor was lifting, falling, and going sideways faster than the items inside it could fall to keep up with. ie - in my loading room, I found items that started out on top of my loading bench on the middle shelf underneath it, cans of WD-40 were underneath the foot of the monitor on the bench.

In our kitchen, the contents of our pantry was ejected out, and the doors closed behind them before they hit the ground(imagine going into your house, all the cupboards closed but their contents on the floor next to them)

Link Posted: 9/27/2012 4:52:13 AM EST
Originally Posted By Monsterbishi:
Originally Posted By jeepnik:
Drop, cover, hold on. Sounds like the "drop drills" we did in school when I was a kid. Like dropping and covering you head would keep you from being incinerated when the nuke went off. Drop, cover and hold on will likely only result in folks being found in a kneeling position when the roof debris is removed from their bodies. But, I'm sure it gives someone a warm and fuzzy feeling.

It's likely about as much good as the, now poo pooed, idea of standing in a door way. If the roof caves in, your body posiiton is unimportant, only luck counts. So whether you're standing in the door way, kneeling on the floor (though a good place to pray) or waltzing around the room, it's a crap shoot and you aren't even rolling the dice.


You've never been in a proper (within 10miles of a mag 5.0, sub 10 miles depth) quake have you?

The drop, cover, hold is to get you in a position where you are more protected by falling/moving items, and it works.

Luck is for people who do nothing to shift the odds in their favour, like not standing in a doorway. There is some security footage of some folks in our September 2010 quakes(Peak mag 7.1) that have them in doorways as the whole front of the building dropped in front of them, then watching as they emerged from teh dust where the doorways still stood.

When we had the quakes here in feb 2011(Mag 6.3), the ground movement literally exceeded gravity itself, so the floor was lifting, falling, and going sideways faster than the items inside it could fall to keep up with. ie - in my loading room, I found items that started out on top of my loading bench on the middle shelf underneath it, cans of WD-40 were underneath the foot of the monitor on the bench.

In our kitchen, the contents of our pantry was ejected out, and the doors closed behind them before they hit the ground(imagine going into your house, all the cupboards closed but their contents on the floor next to them)

http://203.97.119.119/fishnhunt/DSC04658.JPG


Damn thats horrible what you went through, and thanks for the personal experience tips.
Link Posted: 9/27/2012 5:44:43 AM EST
I've been in a near direct hit 6.7 earthquake before. Mainly what it did was tear down all the 100 year old shit ass buildings in town. It knocked down many people's brick chimneys, but basically if you were in a house less than 50 years old you were fine. Everything in your kitchen would now be on your floor, pictures off the wall, etc. But almost everyone's house was fine. Natural gas was disrupted/non existent for a long time. My parents were one of the few in town who had hot showers because they had a solar hot water heater on the roof. The earthquake really helped the town a lot, all the shit got torn down, new companies came in, new construction, there were zero deaths.



More Tips:
-Put an extra pair of shoes in a trashbag and tie it to one of the legs of your bed. You don't want to walk on all the broken glass
-Put child locks on kitchen cabinet doors to keep the mess contained.
-Consider storing dishes and in lower drawers rather than cabinets.
-As stated above, don't sleep with shit above you, windows, picture frames, disco balls, etc.

Earthquakes aren't that big of a deal in CA, the building code has planned for them for a long time. Live in something less than 50 years old, and decorate safely and you will probably be fine.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 8:05:01 PM EST
Originally Posted By readyornot:
I've been in a near direct hit 6.7 earthquake before. Mainly what it did was tear down all the 100 year old shit ass buildings in town. It knocked down many people's brick chimneys, but basically if you were in a house less than 50 years old you were fine. Everything in your kitchen would now be on your floor, pictures off the wall, etc. But almost everyone's house was fine. Natural gas was disrupted/non existent for a long time. My parents were one of the few in town who had hot showers because they had a solar hot water heater on the roof. The earthquake really helped the town a lot, all the shit got torn down, new companies came in, new construction, there were zero deaths.

http://www.sjvgeology.org/geology/coalinga_quake/coalinga03.jpg

More Tips:
-Put an extra pair of shoes in a trashbag and tie it to one of the legs of your bed. You don't want to walk on all the broken glass
-Put child locks on kitchen cabinet doors to keep the mess contained.
-Consider storing dishes and in lower drawers rather than cabinets.
-As stated above, don't sleep with shit above you, windows, picture frames, disco balls, etc.

Earthquakes aren't that big of a deal in CA, the building code has planned for them for a long time. Live in something less than 50 years old, and decorate safely and you will probably be fine.


I like the shoes idea thanks.
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 1:17:29 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/21/2012 1:23:30 AM EST by MikeSH]
Originally Posted By readyornot:
I've been in a near direct hit 6.7 earthquake before. Mainly what it did was tear down all the 100 year old shit ass buildings in town. It knocked down many people's brick chimneys, but basically if you were in a house less than 50 years old you were fine. Everything in your kitchen would now be on your floor, pictures off the wall, etc. But almost everyone's house was fine. Natural gas was disrupted/non existent for a long time. My parents were one of the few in town who had hot showers because they had a solar hot water heater on the roof. The earthquake really helped the town a lot, all the shit got torn down, new companies came in, new construction, there were zero deaths.

http://www.sjvgeology.org/geology/coalinga_quake/coalinga03.jpg

More Tips:
-Put an extra pair of shoes in a trashbag and tie it to one of the legs of your bed. You don't want to walk on all the broken glass
-Put child locks on kitchen cabinet doors to keep the mess contained.
-Consider storing dishes and in lower drawers rather than cabinets.
-As stated above, don't sleep with shit above you, windows, picture frames, disco balls, etc.

Earthquakes aren't that big of a deal in CA, the building code has planned for them for a long time. Live in something less than 50 years old, and decorate safely and you will probably be fine.


I was in the Kerman Mendota area when that one hit Coalinga. It was the worst 1 I felt in 41 years of living in Calif. Although LomaPrieta shook us decently in Clovis. As did the last big 1 in L.A. 1993ish? We were in Fresno then. I retrofitted both of those houses when we moved in. Strapped and flex lined the hot water tanks. Attached wrench to gas meter. Bolted frame to foundation and roof to the walls. In the Fresno house we remolded the bathrooms. I put in 2 4x4 on each side of the doors and a big ass header. These were our goto rooms if we could get there.

The Fresno area has been pretty well spared from the damaging quakes. It's far enough away from known faults. Although once the big one hits it'll be flooded when the coast range is breached N of the grapevine. The Central Valleys will become a toxic sea.

Link Posted: 11/21/2012 5:18:24 AM EST
Hey, Monster,

Was in town on the 22'nd, pretty much right next to the CTV building when it hit. One thing I can't stress enough is; if you have one vehicle, don't depend on it at all. We had ours in town for 3 months in the parking building behind the IRD building there, obviously, due to its proximity to the CTV building, it was one of the later buildings cleared. We had no food or other supplies (like most of the town), if it wasn't for family coming up from Invercargill & bringing supplies and a spare vehicle we would have been well and truly screwed I think.

One thing that helped us (we were in Spreydon at the time, got of quite lightly), was to criss-cross the glass in the windows with duct tape (like they did during the Blitz in the UK) to prevent any shattering after the fact with the continuous aftershocks - they cracked & broke, but never shattered after that.

What part of town you in?
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 5:41:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By Skibane:

Seismic gas shut-off valves are also pretty common in that part of the country.

Don't they make these for (large) propane tanks as well?


Link Posted: 11/21/2012 5:45:00 AM EST
Originally Posted By jukeboxx13:
Anyone else have any helpful tips or past experience. thanks


I lived in California for many years and have been through many large earthquakes. Sylmar 1970 ish, knocked me out of bed. 7.1 earthquake.
Anyhow we had two plastic trash cans packed with a tent, food, water, shoes for each person, clothing for each person, first aid kit, bathroom essentials etc.
When it hits there is no time for preparing, it is too late. If it happens in the middle of the night everyone is scrambling and you have zero time to react. BTW, someone mentioned that a door frame is not a good place to stand.
It is the only place to stand as you don't have to worry about things falling on your head. I lived in Mammoth lakes in the 70s and early 80s and we earthquakes literally every day for almost a year in 1982.
I remember an aftershock, and I was outside, I could see the wave on the asphalt road coming right at us. That road was lifting up a good foot. Scary MFers.

Link Posted: 11/21/2012 5:50:24 AM EST
Originally Posted By readyornot:
I've been in a near direct hit 6.7 earthquake before. Mainly what it did was tear down all the 100 year old shit ass buildings in town. It knocked down many people's brick chimneys, but basically if you were in a house less than 50 years old you were fine. Everything in your kitchen would now be on your floor, pictures off the wall, etc. But almost everyone's house was fine. Natural gas was disrupted/non existent for a long time. My parents were one of the few in town who had hot showers because they had a solar hot water heater on the roof. The earthquake really helped the town a lot, all the shit got torn down, new companies came in, new construction, there were zero deaths.

http://www.sjvgeology.org/geology/coalinga_quake/coalinga03.jpg

More Tips:
-Put an extra pair of shoes in a trashbag and tie it to one of the legs of your bed. You don't want to walk on all the broken glass
-Put child locks on kitchen cabinet doors to keep the mess contained.
-Consider storing dishes and in lower drawers rather than cabinets.
-As stated above, don't sleep with shit above you, windows, picture frames, disco balls, etc.

Earthquakes aren't that big of a deal in CA, the building code has planned for them for a long time. Live in something less than 50 years old, and decorate safely and you will probably be fine.


I keep hearing "newer than 50 years." My house is 103 years old. Being as far north as I am and away from the coast, historically I'm not in a center. I however don't exclude a shaker to possible natural disasters. Oddly enough, we are starting to get tornados here. I've lived in the Nor Sac Val my entire life and can't remember a season were we have had more than a funnel cloud. This winter we've had two touch down luckily not doing ant damage to structures.
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