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Posted: 1/7/2012 7:14:33 AM EDT
I lurk far more than I post, and have been wanting to get into canning for quite some time. Lots of local farmer's markets in my area with great fruits and veggies at inexpensive prices, so it would seem to make sense for me to can. Due to all the great information you guys have posted on canning, I decided to take the plunge. Asked for a pressure canner and Ball canning book for Christmas, and I was off.

Decided to keep it simple for a test run. I got 6 pounds of Grannie Smith apples, put them up in medium syrup. It went off far easier than building an FN/FAL in the garage, and all the jars sealed properly. I plan to open and eat one jar every two months to judge taste, and see how long they'll stay good. I'll put up some more fruits, then try my hand at low-acidic veggies using the pressure method instead of hot water bath. Eventually I'd like to can meats, soups, and fish, but figure I'd better work myself up slowly.

Just wanted to say thanks to all the posters that put out so much info, it was a great help. Love this forum.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 8:51:34 AM EDT
Canning is one of the best means to stocking your shelves, lots of free fruit and berries on most farms these days because the kids don't want to mess with their parents trees/vines after their gone. Try some meats when you get the chance.
Link Posted: 1/8/2012 4:26:20 AM EDT
Welcome to your new addiction!

Keep in mind––it is often cheaper to buy canned goods then it is to can them yourself...Unless you have access to ridiculously low-priced food stocks. You will find that many people are more than happy to allow you to take foods from their land (berries and fruit trees) when politely asked. A gift basket of preserves or jellies made from their donated produce often gets you welcomed back year after year.

It's cool to learn, but watch your costs. Canning store-bought produce isn't cost effective.

Where it really shines for us is soups and stews. We have several dishes the kids love, and it is so nice to come home to real home cooked food that literally only has to be heated up!

Read the warnings in your Blue Book and watch your sanitization...this can be deadly if attention isn't properly paid.

Great to have you on board! It's a lost art returning to favor!
Link Posted: 1/8/2012 7:24:19 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Sixtigers:
Welcome to your new addiction!

Keep in mind––it is often cheaper to buy canned goods then it is to can them yourself...Unless you have access to ridiculously low-priced food stocks. You will find that many people are more than happy to allow you to take foods from their land (berries and fruit trees) when politely asked. A gift basket of preserves or jellies made from their donated produce often gets you welcomed back year after year.

It's cool to learn, but watch your costs. Canning store-bought produce isn't cost effective.

Where it really shines for us is soups and stews. We have several dishes the kids love, and it is so nice to come home to real home cooked food that literally only has to be heated up!

Read the warnings in your Blue Book and watch your sanitization...this can be deadly if attention isn't properly paid.

Great to have you on board! It's a lost art returning to favor!


Which pressure canner do you recommend?

Link Posted: 1/8/2012 10:57:55 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Sixtigers:
Welcome to your new addiction!

Keep in mind––it is often cheaper to buy canned goods then it is to can them yourself...Unless you have access to ridiculously low-priced food stocks. You will find that many people are more than happy to allow you to take foods from their land (berries and fruit trees) when politely asked. A gift basket of preserves or jellies made from their donated produce often gets you welcomed back year after year.

It's cool to learn, but watch your costs. Canning store-bought produce isn't cost effective.

Where it really shines for us is soups and stews. We have several dishes the kids love, and it is so nice to come home to real home cooked food that literally only has to be heated up!

Read the warnings in your Blue Book and watch your sanitization...this can be deadly if attention isn't properly paid.

Great to have you on board! It's a lost art returning to favor!


You also have to be watchful at farmers markets. They're not always the Mom & Pop operation most people envision; some of the unscrupulous (IMO) vendors simply buy large quantities at the same produce auctions many of the grocery stores use, load it in the back of the truck and haul it to the farmers market and double the price. Best bet is to grow your own garden if you can .

Welcome to canning, though!
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