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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 7/13/2008 12:55:01 PM EST
There's a big difference in price, so I thought I would ask here for advice.

Also, do I need to stock up on canning-wax and canning-salt? I'm brand new to this.

Thanks.
Link Posted: 7/13/2008 2:37:51 PM EST
I have both.
I have had the Presto (7 qrt capacity) for 20+ years. Great canner. Only draw back is capacity and the gasket.
i've had my All American (14 qrt capacity) almost a year - love it. Only draw back is the price.

I can about 48 quarts at a time. with the Presto that would take all day, it now takes exactly half that amount of time or less since I don't occasionally lose time resealing the Presto

I've been buying pork, chicken, and hamburger at $1 a lb or cheaper and have put up a couple hundred pounds.
Link Posted: 7/13/2008 4:14:54 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/13/2008 4:16:52 PM EST by vic-303]
The AA canners are overbuilt -- enough to hand down safely to your grandkids, if you do not boil it dry. The Presto will need replacement gaskets on a scheduled basis. THe AA has zero gaskets.

Wax seals are generally frowned on these days, but I have used them on jellies in the past and they kept for over a decade without spoilage.

Canning salt is important if you are pickling foods.


For some excellent canning advice visit the forums at www.mrssurvival.com and read thru their canning info.
Link Posted: 7/13/2008 4:33:51 PM EST
Link Posted: 7/13/2008 7:10:03 PM EST
I have used both, but I currently use and prefer the All American design. We use it on an outdoor cooker, it is too heavy for regular use in the kitchen. If I ever see a used two level all American Pressure canner at a good price I will purchase it also.

We bought ours new (as a cosmetic second) from All American a number of years ago, I now wish I would have bought two of them.
Link Posted: 7/13/2008 8:33:49 PM EST


All American for the win.

Get an All American and I guarantee your grandchildren will be using it.

Link Posted: 7/14/2008 3:37:01 AM EST
+1 on the All American.

We have the 21qt version, ran us a tad over 200 bucks. Absolutely the best purchase we have made when it comes to food preservation. No gasket to wear out, and they are built like tanks.

FYI, All American canners were used by those people in the Alaska series on discovery channel. I was all excited, because my wife and I had just bought the same model tehy were using on the show.
Link Posted: 7/14/2008 2:15:17 PM EST
for canning info check Ball, also maybe pick up one of the books, most hardware stores have them this time of year.
Link Posted: 7/14/2008 4:39:19 PM EST

Originally Posted By Electronrider:
+1 on the All American.

We have the 21qt version, ran us a tad over 200 bucks. Absolutely the best purchase we have made when it comes to food preservation. No gasket to wear out, and they are built like tanks.

FYI, All American canners were used by those people in the Alaska series on discovery channel. I was all excited, because my wife and I had just bought the same model tehy were using on the show.


We've got the same one. It's the berries.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 3:13:58 PM EST
I would rather cook in a stailess Presto.
Canning is something altogether different.
All American canners are the best hands down.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 3:40:17 AM EST

Originally Posted By firefinder:
I would rather cook in a stailess Presto.
Canning is something altogether different.
All American canners are the best hands down.


I'm with you on this. We have a SS presto for cooking and I wouldn't feel comfortable cooking in an aluminum pressure cooker, especially with acidic foods like tomatoes.

Does anybody make large SS pressure cookers that don't need a gasket like the AA canners?
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