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Posted: 7/15/2008 6:58:24 AM EDT
I am crossposting from here since there wasn't a lot of discussion:
www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=731938

My wife and mother were having a discussion last night about a replacement for mom's aging Jenn-Air stove. She doesn't have natural gas available. My wife, always having to suffer through my wisdom, advice, and amusing anecdotes gleaned from ARFCOM, told my mother that perhaps Torf could get some useful insight on "his web site".

So here it is, posed to you in the spirit of all the Dyson threads to date: Induction Cooktops, does anyone have them? How do you like them? Advantages, pitfalls, conspiracies, etc? What was the cook top that Dennis Haysbert used in the movie "Heat"?

Discuss, and inform!

Yes, I understand that magnetic cookware is required.
Link Posted: 7/15/2008 7:01:51 AM EDT
I like them, however they do take some getting used to. You can burn/destroy an entire meal in a lot less time during the learning curve period.

The cost of all the new cookware makes it a non issue for me. I have great cookware now and I truly good/professional grade magnetic stuff isn't readily available yet (not at a decent price anyway).

Link Posted: 7/18/2008 2:39:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Torf:

Yes, I understand that magnetic cookware is required.


That sums it up from my experience.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 6:13:51 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/19/2008 6:28:06 AM EDT by firefinder]
I would have thought any metal would be fine for induction heating.
Cast iron should be superior.
We use induction heaters in industry on Steel,Aluminum,Copper and Iron.
Copper and Aluminum would require more power being Non-ferrous.

I guess Inuction stovetops may not have enough power for Non-ferrous vessels.

Link Posted: 7/19/2008 1:15:47 PM EDT
I have never heard of induction cooking, so TAG
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 1:34:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By colklink:
I have never heard of induction cooking, so TAG


It is pretty neat stuff. You can boil water on the stovetop in under 90 seconds (rolling boil). Remove the pan and the stove top is cool to the touch.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 1:50:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DV8:

Originally Posted By colklink:
I have never heard of induction cooking, so TAG


It is pretty neat stuff. You can boil water on the stovetop in under 90 seconds (rolling boil). Remove the pan and the stove top is cool to the touch.



That does sound pretty cool.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 7:04:39 AM EDT
So, what does the market look like for induction cooktops? Still priced high? Non-ferrous compatibility yet?
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 8:14:50 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Torf:
So, what does the market look like for induction cooktops? Still priced high? Non-ferrous compatibility yet?



Induction stoves are still pretty pricey. Throw in the cost of the cookware, it is a very pricey venture. Personally, I would rather have a nice Viking or similar gas cooktop.


Link Posted: 7/21/2008 9:03:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DV8:

Originally Posted By Torf:
So, what does the market look like for induction cooktops? Still priced high? Non-ferrous compatibility yet?



Induction stoves are still pretty pricey. Throw in the cost of the cookware, it is a very pricey venture. Personally, I would rather have a nice Viking or similar gas cooktop.




What about for those of us who have no Natural Gas option?

Is it a viable alternative?
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 9:37:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Torf:

Originally Posted By DV8:

Originally Posted By Torf:
So, what does the market look like for induction cooktops? Still priced high? Non-ferrous compatibility yet?



Induction stoves are still pretty pricey. Throw in the cost of the cookware, it is a very pricey venture. Personally, I would rather have a nice Viking or similar gas cooktop.




What about for those of us who have no Natural Gas option?

Is it a viable alternative?


For the money, I would get a decent flat top with a convection oven underneath. A decent one will run you less than $700. The induction concept has been around for a few years. The first time I had heard about it was about 8 years ago. Was extremely expensive then. Still expensive now.

Manufacturing technology is catching up with demand. I am starting to see Induction Stoves in box stores. Prices should come way down in the next year or two.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 10:14:15 AM EDT
Here is some real good info on induction stoves.

Induction Stove Cooktops

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