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9/16/2019 10:09:13 PM
Posted: 3/27/2009 11:54:54 AM EDT
So, I'm shopping around for some more AA rechargeable batteries. I already have quite a few Eneloop batteries, but now I'm looking for something very specific: the highest capacity AA battery on the market. While the Eneloops are great for holding their charge, I find that they're rather lacking in capacity for my flashlights. I don't mind having to charge my flashlight batteries ever week, but I hate my light going dead when I need it.

So, let's have a treasure hunt. Whoever finds me the highest capacity AA NiMH battery in the next 72 hours wins... my gratitude.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 12:31:02 PM EDT
Of all the ones I have used... Eneloop. I saw your thread and was going to say exactly those. So you are ahead of the power curve.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:36:49 PM EDT
How about these?

Delkin 2900mAh AA

While I haven't used these, I can heartily endorse Thomas Distributing and their products.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:19:10 PM EDT
Originally Posted By GreatDane:
While the Eneloops are great for holding their charge, I find that they're rather lacking in capacity for my flashlights. I don't mind having to charge my flashlight batteries ever week, but I hate my light going dead when I need it.


Honestly, there really isn't much real-world difference in run-time between a 2200 mAH Eneloop and a conventional 2800 mAH Sanyo or similar NiMH cell - and the difference quickly shifts in the Eneloop's favor after they've been sitting on the shelf for just a week or so. It seems like the more capacity they try to cram into an AA cell, the faster it self-discharges. The shelf life of my high-capacity NiMH Sanyos and Duracells is absolutely pathetic.

For this reason, I've pretty much abandoned them, in favor of 2200 mAH Kodak pre-charged cells (which are functionally identical to the Eneloops) - In my high-drain flashlights, they always deliver their advertised capacity - even after sitting on the shelf for 6 months.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:22:25 PM EDT
Bah. I was hoping someone had some hidden, magical 4 trazillion mAH cell out there somewhere. Guess I'll just stick with my Eneloops.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 12:12:11 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Skibane:
Originally Posted By GreatDane:
While the Eneloops are great for holding their charge, I find that they're rather lacking in capacity for my flashlights. I don't mind having to charge my flashlight batteries ever week, but I hate my light going dead when I need it.


Honestly, there really isn't much real-world difference in run-time between a 2200 mAH Eneloop and a conventional 2800 mAH Sanyo or similar NiMH cell - and the difference quickly shifts in the Eneloop's favor after they've been sitting on the shelf for just a week or so. It seems like the more capacity they try to cram into an AA cell, the faster it self-discharges. The shelf life of my high-capacity NiMH Sanyos and Duracells is absolutely pathetic.

For this reason, I've pretty much abandoned them, in favor of 2200 mAH Kodak pre-charged cells (which are functionally identical to the Eneloops) - In my high-drain flashlights, they always deliver their advertised capacity - even after sitting on the shelf for 6 months.


I have many questions regarding this post so please answer them all...

I thought Eneloops were 2000 mah rated, not 2200 mah. Is there a new Eneloop? I thought Sanyo had 2700 and 2900 mah batteries and no 2800. Can you provide links to the 2200 mah Eneloops and 2800 mah Sanyo?

I have seen studies where 2700 mah sanyo batts have more juice at 3 months than Enenloops after 3 months sitting around after a full charge. Can you provide a link to the testing that shows Eneloops outperforming any decent battery within 3 months? I thought the crossover lines were past 6 months (I think regular 2700 mah Sanyos have more mah left at a 1A draw at 6 months) and hundreds of cycles for Eneloops to perform better other than voltage and the amount of current you can draw off them. I know at 100 recharge cycles the Eneloops have significantly less capacity... perhaps you are reffering to batteries with over 100 recharge cycles sitting around and the Eneloops are giving a small edge in performance at that point?

I know the Kodak precharged cells are NOT functionally identical to Eneloops. They have a higher mah rating but lower voltage and cannot sustain heavy draws. I want to say Eneloops have consistant .1 V higher voltage and they have almost 200 mah less capacity if I remember correctly. Eneloops work at a 10A draw and Kodak fall flat for sure at 6A and perhaps at anything over 4A. THis is what I remember off the top of my head. This is totally dissimilar performance to me.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 5:30:23 AM EDT
I bought some Ultralast 2600 mAh NiMH AA's at Fry's in Houston and have been pretty pleased with them.
I remember thinking when I bought them that they were cheap, so I didn't expect much.
However, I put them in my streamlight sidewinder and they work pretty well and have held a charge for about 6 months or so.
(light use of the flashlight)
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