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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/25/2005 5:14:58 PM EDT
I know I have asked this question before, but forgot who it was. I started to grind down to find the pins, but couldnt bring myself to get any closer to the barrel. I would rather a pro do it for me!!

I need this done fairly quickly,

Thanks, Mike
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 5:29:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PLASTIXPLUS:
I know I have asked this question before, but forgot who it was. I started to grind down to find the pins, but couldnt bring myself to get any closer to the barrel. I would rather a pro do it for me!!

I need this done fairly quickly,

Thanks, Mike



I would think a blowtorch to heat up the compensator, and a pin with a rubber mallot might loosen it up, shouldn't be much different than taking out the pin on the yugo sks grenade launcher.

-mark
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 6:41:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MauserMark:

Originally Posted By PLASTIXPLUS:
I know I have asked this question before, but forgot who it was. I started to grind down to find the pins, but couldnt bring myself to get any closer to the barrel. I would rather a pro do it for me!!

I need this done fairly quickly,

Thanks, Mike



I would think a blowtorch to heat up the compensator, and a pin with a rubber mallot might loosen it up, shouldn't be much different than taking out the pin on the yugo sks grenade launcher.

-mark



Silly me!!!! I forgot about the yugo sks grenade launcher!!! WHAT THE HECK IS THAT???? I'm sorry, just never heard of that and was hoping for an easier alternative.
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 6:57:40 PM EDT
Linky

TC
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 8:44:31 PM EDT
NFA Investments (281) 639-0026

www.NFAinvestments.com

Link Posted: 8/26/2005 3:46:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AK-Joe:
NFA Investments (281) 639-0026

www.NFAinvestments.com




DUH! Ask Joe, stupid!!!

Thanks,
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 4:28:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AK-Joe:
NFA Investments (281) 639-0026

www.NFAinvestments.com





+1


i did mine myself though, wasnt as hard as you think.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 12:18:15 PM EDT
If you still want a 'smith to do it, give Derek a call at Sportsmans Guns & Ammo (936) 756-GUNS. Good work at reasonable prices. He's done work for me before and will make sure you get what you want. He's up here in Conroe (God's Country!!)
Oilfieldtrash - over and out...
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 1:37:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By oilfieldtrash1:
If you still want a 'smith to do it, give Derek a call at Sportsmans Guns & Ammo (936) 756-GUNS. Good work at reasonable prices. He's done work for me before and will make sure you get what you want. He's up here in Conroe (God's Country!!)
Oilfieldtrash - over and out...



Thanks, I'll keep his number if Keith doesnt get back with me.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 6:16:06 PM EDT
I've done them on a couple of rifles. I assume you paid close attention before you started grinding and made sure you're grinding on the slightly discolored spot where the top of the pin was welded over and reblued.

Grinding too far is certainly a real problem. One thing to remember is that even if you slightly grind into the threads, twisting the brake off is going to un-gall the threads unless you really dig in too far. You can actually tell when you get close to the threads. If you slow down, you'll just barely grind into the top of the threads in a small area. The real trick is finsding the pin. Grinding usually blends the pin in perfectly with the surrounding metal. When you get close, the key os to use a wrench or a screwdriver and wiggle the brake back-and-forth. This will usually reveal the pin easily. It may take considerable torque to break the pin loose. Once you do though, it usually falls right out and you're home free.

Try to finish it yourself - it really isn't rocket science...
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 7:11:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Zhukov:
I've done them on a couple of rifles. I assume you paid close attention before you started grinding and made sure you're grinding on the slightly discolored spot where the top of the pin was welded over and reblued.

Grinding too far is certainly a real problem. One thing to remember is that even if you slightly grind into the threads, twisting the brake off is going to un-gall the threads unless you really dig in too far. You can actually tell when you get close to the threads. If you slow down, you'll just barely grind into the top of the threads in a small area. The real trick is finsding the pin. Grinding usually blends the pin in perfectly with the surrounding metal. When you get close, the key os to use a wrench or a screwdriver and wiggle the brake back-and-forth. This will usually reveal the pin easily. It may take considerable torque to break the pin loose. Once you do though, it usually falls right out and you're home free.

Try to finish it yourself - it really isn't rocket science...



Thanks Zukhov,

As I was grinding, I was able to expose the pi, or at least it showed itself. I have not tried to go any farther. I did start at the discolored areas and found the pins rather easy. I assume they are more apt to break free the closer you get to the barrel threads? I think I am about half ay ther right now.

Thanks, mike
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:06:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Zhukov:

twisting the brake off is going to un-gall the threads unless you really dig in too far.



I would be most interested in hearing what your definition of "un-gall" is?
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:11:34 PM EDT
Rather unscientific term - I was trying to point out that if you grind a little bit into the male threads and flatten them, then unscrweing the brake is sort of like using a cutting die to "chase the threads".
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:18:23 PM EDT
Agreed.

The reason that I asked is that galling in my world is localized surface fusion of materials like austenitic stainless steels due to lack of lubrication; the end result is typically scrapping both pieces...i.e., there is no such thing as "un".
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 8:36:05 PM EDT
i think forcing it would make it worse.



"flatening" the threads when you force it.

b­ut this is just my $0.02
of 7-8yrs of being a mechanic
Link Posted: 8/27/2005 9:26:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Zhukov:
Rather unscientific term - I was trying to point out that if you grind a little bit into the male threads and flatten them, then unscrweing the brake is sort of like using a cutting die to "chase the threads".



Is there 1 pin or 2 opposite of each other??
Link Posted: 8/27/2005 12:10:18 PM EDT
In my experience, there's ONE pin, and it's usually installed on the bottom (6 o'clock) position. The hole is drilled through the brake and partially into the barrel before the pin is driven in.
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