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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 7/26/2005 4:04:43 PM EDT
I have been having an extremly hard time finding a teaching job here in MI, as has my GF. I have also been informed that There are many jobs for teachers in the Carolinas. We are of course willing to relocate, and I was wondering where I should look. I have narrowed it down to a few states, and Guam.

Where in the carolinas would I be able to find a teaching job?

Thank you for your replies.
Link Posted: 7/26/2005 5:46:14 PM EDT
http://wsfcs.k12.nc.us/about/index.html
Start here and see if it gives you any useful info.
Quam!?
GLOCK-23
Link Posted: 7/26/2005 5:54:41 PM EDT
Excellent. Thank you. It looks like there are some teaching openings there for sure. Can you tell me more about the area?
Link Posted: 7/27/2005 2:30:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By killingmachine123:
Excellent. Thank you. It looks like there are some teaching openings there for sure. Can you tell me more about the area?




Hot, Humid, chance of rain from March to October.

tobacco, Nascar, NCAA b-ball, Panthers, Hurricanes, new Dell plant, second in the country for raising taxes (but still but still pretty cheap), pretty fair gun laws (depends on the local LEO), real nice beaches and mountains, and the only state east of the Mississippi river with no lottery

that about sums it up
Link Posted: 7/27/2005 3:31:37 AM EDT
Pick your district wisely.

There are many problems in the Charleston County School system.

Bloated bureaucracies limit the fundage making it into the classroom.

The superintendent is always in the news for questionable decisions and motives.

Do your homework.
Link Posted: 7/27/2005 5:37:10 AM EDT
bearkly county in sc is pretty good
Link Posted: 7/27/2005 9:07:39 AM EDT
What part of MI are you from? My GF and I moved here from MI two and a half years ago. I was a "flying dutchman."

In NC teacher's salaries aren't going to be as high as MI. Which is why it's easy to get a teaching job in NC. It's just a fact of life. I live in the RTP area, and can say that the areas locally with good teacher salaries are also pretty anti-gun... Cary... Chapel Hill... Carrboro... Raleigh area is a good compromise. If you look in the triangle, just don't put up residence in Durham or Orange Counties. If you were forced, Orange (where I am) is livable, but repeat after me: I won't move into Durham County.... I won't move into Durham County.... A gun person would be miserable.

On the plus side, there is no registration for handguns (like michigan's "safety inspection") If you choose the right county, you can have all of the suppressors, SBR's, etc. that you can afford. I can't tell you which county though. Only make suggestions.

The coast is nice, and honestly the coast and the mountains are some of the better reasons for comming to NC.

Be prepared to pay for an annual emissions inspection on your car, and be prepared to pay property tax on vehicles, pets, etc. (Yes, PETS)

All in all, it's not a bad place to live. Weather beats the crap out of those long Michigan winters. (It gets down to 28 and people think it's cold.) I've had classes canceled on the mere threat of snow, but never seen more than an inch. Most drivers suck. A little rain and the highways are clogged with accidents.

People in the South are much more laid back than up north and all in all much more friendly. RTP/CARY might be an exception because they are all new yorkers. Chapel Hill is dominated by the Religious Left Wing.

If you've never tried 'sweet tea,' be careful. It's like drinking syrup. I still can't take it.

I'm not yet decided on whether I'm going to stay here when I'm done with grad school but it definitely won't be back to MI.
Link Posted: 7/27/2005 1:55:18 PM EDT
I am from SE MI, Rochester right now, but I lived in royal oak for most of my life. Thanks for the information. Anyone else can feel free to chime in, as all the info I can get will help.
Link Posted: 7/27/2005 7:17:13 PM EDT
The old lady says that you need to look
here
Link Posted: 7/28/2005 6:07:54 AM EDT
Alright, I am getting a lot of information and job postings now. I am still in the dark as to which counties would be the best to move to. I have gotten some info on that here, but I would like all I can get. Thanks again guys.
Link Posted: 7/28/2005 10:58:33 AM EDT
Durham & Orange counties are not gun friendly and very congested. Wake county is crowded but friendlier toward firearms. Chatham & Lee counties are still not too busy and also gun friendly. The cost of living is deffinatley lower in the last two.
Link Posted: 7/28/2005 11:40:24 AM EDT
Davidson county is very gun friendly
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 5:06:31 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/15/2005 5:07:15 AM EDT by BC-Sgt-USMC-3rdRec82]
I've been real happy in Alexander County. Its a nice rural system w/ easy & quick access to Hickory... Go to the NC DPI website and click on employment. You can find links to every system in the State and their current vacancies. What subjects do you (and your wife) teach? I'm an assistant principal @ the high school level...


Bill C.


Link Posted: 8/15/2005 6:27:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BC-Sgt-USMC-3rdRec82:
I've been real happy in Alexander County. Its a nice rural system w/ easy & quick access to Hickory... Go to the NC DPI website and click on employment. You can find links to every system in the State and their current vacancies. What subjects do you (and your wife) teach? I'm an assistant principal @ the high school level...


Bill C.





We are both certified K-8 self contained. I am middle school social studies, and she is middle school language arts.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 10:19:14 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/15/2005 10:31:56 AM EDT by Cope]
NC certainly needs another killingmachine in it's school system.

Don't overlook the western counties of Buncombe, Henderson, or Haywood.

A.C. Reynolds district of Buncombe gets my vote.

buncombe
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 1:48:59 PM EDT
There was something on the news last week about Greensboro and Burlington needing something like 50 teaching spots to fill!
GLOCK-23
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 7:36:10 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/17/2005 6:49:11 AM EDT by BC-Sgt-USMC-3rdRec82]
my killing machine days have slipped on the by.... But, kids attitude change alot when they see what I used to do for a living though!

Semper Fi!

Swift, Silent, Deadly.............
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 9:26:23 AM EDT
West Alexander Middle School is looking for (1) Self Contained Teacher & (1) Theatre Arts Teacher....

www.alexander.k12.nc.us ----- on the right of the page is a link for vacancies, click it...

Good luck!!
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 4:24:57 PM EDT
Check out Union County, Cabarrus, Iredell, Gaston, Cleveland Also, Stay away from Mecklenburg. And if you decide on Gaston, talk to me and Caveman befor you move here.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 4:35:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Cope:
NC certainly needs another killingmachine in it's school system.

Don't overlook the western counties of Buncombe, Henderson, or Haywood.

A.C. Reynolds district of Buncombe gets my vote.

buncombe



One of the most beautiful places to live....but horrid politics. Rolling Stone mag did a story on Asheville and called it the San fran of the east...

...I could still tolerate it from Liecester...


-HS
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 12:13:05 PM EDT
sigh....

The sad truth of the matter is that folk coming from outside the state are more likely to get education jobs than those native-raised. That may sound bitter, but it's true. Unless you want to work in the public schools with Raleigh breathing down your neck telling you what you will and won't teach, you're SOL. Nothing higher ed, nothing support. The problem is that folk are moving down from up north who don't have any kids, so when school bonds come up they raise tee-total hell to get them shot down. That means crap salaries, no money for programs, and an overall sorry educational environment. I'll make more my first year teaching in a private school in NoVa than a teacher with several years behind him would back home.

I won't discourage you from moving down our way- after all, historians are an underappreciated commodity wherever we are, right?- but I do ask that you try to fit in. I know that may sound sort of patronizing, but please hear me out. The state is hurting right now. We're losing jobs, wages are dropping, our farms are dying, and developers are knocking off the tops of our mountains. The last thing we need are more people coming in telling us how they did it up north and trying to make us something we're not. We don't appreciate having our dialect mocked, our traditions ridiculed, and our history ignored. Try and assimilate, enjoy our local culture the way it is, and you'll be welcome. If you go in to join the gated-community set, don't expect much "southern hospitality." I hope, as a historian and one who most likely understands the nature of modern economic colonialism in Appalachia, you'll take this to heart.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 4:41:32 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/20/2005 6:01:05 PM EDT by BC-Sgt-USMC-3rdRec82]
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 6:50:15 PM EDT
It wasn't so much to get the job I wanted- I had to eat and still be able to pay my student loans. As for the folks moving in? Give me the studies. I've seen the plates on their cars.

It's not about money so much as it is culture. That was the thrust of most of my post. We're losing the traditional culture that once bound us together. I watched it happen from my childhood till now; first the way we spoke, then the way we made our living, and now the land itself. That's the important thing. With the death of farming and the development of a largely service economy in our end of the state, people have been displaced and disenfranchised. This economy is largely centered on the growing retirement development in our end of the state. The land means something to us, perhaps much more than outsiders can understand. My family has been in Western North Carolina for two hundred and fifty years. This is where my mothers and fathers, their parents, their parents' parents, and their parents' parents lived, loved, worked and died. Those mountains mean more to me than silver and gold- they're who I am. I'm part of them, and they're always with me. It's our land and our culture that we're trying to hang on to. we may seem like a simple, close-minded people, and in many ways perhaps we are. But since we've been told so much to open our eyes to see others, it seems no one's ever thought to see us as any more than the knuckle-dragging semi-savages of nineteenth century local color stories.

We are not, by the way, "rednecks." Thank you. Perhaps that's something you may never be able to understand.
Link Posted: 8/18/2005 9:22:42 AM EDT
This discussion reminds me of a professor I had at WCU. Although he was slick as a "Philadelphia Lawyer", he managed to blend into the mtn. culture quite well.

On his car, the following bumper sticker was displayed.

Link Posted: 8/18/2005 9:45:11 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/18/2005 9:50:45 AM EDT by pisgahrifle]
You ought to have lopped off the "ly" in local, Cope! ht (ASU '02, '04)

I actually wouldn't mind teaching out at Western when I come home. Lots more room out that way than there is around the house these days. My Dad's folks are originally from out that way, anyway, and we've still got a few relations there and further out towards Murphy.
Link Posted: 8/18/2005 4:10:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/20/2005 6:08:37 PM EDT by BC-Sgt-USMC-3rdRec82]
decided to withdraw my posts... ain't the right forum to wax philosophical in someone else's "looking for a job post," for me... Hope ya find the job in the place you want, I did!!!
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