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Posted: 10/26/2013 7:29:13 AM EST
I want to build a Vogelzang steel drum stove but I've never shopped for a steel drum before. An internet search wasn't very helpful and Craigslist had a lot of used stuff. I don't really want to have to burn unknown liquids out of a used barrel to clean it. Anyone know where I can score a new steel drum locally in Atlanta suburbs? What prices should I expect?



Link Posted: 10/26/2013 7:50:54 AM EST
Originally Posted By Greglat1:
I want to build a Vogelzang steel drum stove but I've never shopped for a steel drum before. An internet search wasn't very helpful and Craigslist had a lot of used stuff. I don't really want to have to burn unknown liquids out of a used barrel to clean it. Anyone know where I can score a new steel drum locally in Atlanta suburbs? What prices should I expect?

<a href="http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/405/681q.jpg/" target="_blank">http://img405.imageshack.us/img405/5692/681q.jpg</a>

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New Drums are expensive. Might as well just buy a stove at that point. I am thinking $50-$100 for a new steel drum. I wonder if a beer keg would work? Also If you know what was in there, like these perhaps, I wouldn't worry about it.

http://atlanta.craigslist.org/eat/for/4005969211.html
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 8:20:06 AM EST
$50 to $100 for a new one would be worth it to me if that is what I have to pay. Just the fuel to get a used one in Monroe (I live in Woodstock) would cost me a pretty penny.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 8:24:39 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/26/2013 8:35:16 AM EST by robpiat]
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Originally Posted By Greglat1:
$50 to $100 for a new one would be worth it to me if that is what I have to pay. Just the fuel to get a used one in Monroe (I live in Woodstock) would cost me a pretty penny.
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Uline, but they are damn near as far as monroe.

Are you putting it inside or outdoors? Outside, I don't think that stuff will last very long in the elements. The drum will corrode over a winter without a coating. They aren't painted inside and not sure how they take to fire. Perhaps the overkill way would be to cut it open, paint it with hi temp paint, then weld it back.

Inside, the proper vent pipes ($30-$40 / foot) etc will far outweigh the cost of buying a quality stove. I'd either do it right ($1-2000 turnkey or so) or just put the energy into a awesome fire pit outdoors.

The survival forum here has plenty of wood stove / fireplace insert experts. I have a Little Vogelzang stove I got on clearance from sportsmans guide and the cost to safely / properly install keeps me from messing with it. If I do it, it'll be with a sealed US made stove. I am holding onto this one for perhaps a standalone garage or something.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 12:08:15 PM EST
Was going to use it indoors as a back-up heating sources, so probably not going to get much use and I won't need much piping. Perhaps I will look into a used stove too so I don't waste a ton of money. That's for the advice fellas!
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 1:49:47 PM EST
I got some that had thinner in them once you burn it once you got noting to worry about. IMO I would get a food grade stainless drum I used to have one but somebody stole it.
I paid 50.00 for the stainless drum it was 55 gal and had cooking oil in it.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 2:37:41 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Greglat1:
Was going to use it indoors as a back-up heating sources, so probably not going to get much use and I won't need much piping. Perhaps I will look into a used stove too so I don't waste a ton of money. That's for the advice fellas!
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IIRC the guys made a big deal about getting a quality used stove and whenever possible venting it straight up through the roof. Not a 90 degree corner to the wall etc.

I've head that craigslist buys on older stoves are great and also the englander stoves are a good value.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 5:32:22 PM EST
You will get way more heat out of a drum stove if you do a dual-drum design. Single drum stoves aren't very efficient at radiating heat. I don't know if that particular kit includes or tells you to do it, but a brick "lining" can make a drum last longer and helps it to give off heat.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 5:43:50 PM EST
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Originally Posted By oversteer:
You will get way more heat out of a drum stove if you do a dual-drum design. Single drum stoves aren't very efficient at radiating heat. I don't know if that particular kit includes or tells you to do it, but a brick "lining" can make a drum last longer and helps it to give off heat.
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Good advice, thanks!
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