Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 3/25/2006 8:30:03 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/25/2006 12:01:21 PM EDT by cgj]
Any bee folk in the Tucson area want a free swarm? This little heap is resting up on the mesquite out front. Actual size of the swarm is about 5" diameter. Come and get 'em before they move on:

Link Posted: 3/25/2006 2:16:52 PM EDT
These things happen!
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 9:32:16 PM EDT
That is nuts. Bees freak me out. I always wonder what I would do if I ran into a swarm of the Africanized killer bees while out in the desert.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 10:20:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By WarNerve:
That is nuts. Bees freak me out. I always wonder what I would do if I ran into a swarm of the Africanized killer bees while out in the desert.



I would have some one throw a bottle of tannerite at it. Just as it hits the hive I would shoot the bottle and blow them up.

w00t!
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 6:25:31 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/26/2006 6:28:38 AM EDT by cgj]

Originally Posted By mjrowley:

Originally Posted By WarNerve:
That is nuts. Bees freak me out. I always wonder what I would do if I ran into a swarm of the Africanized killer bees while out in the desert.



I would have some one throw a bottle of tannerite at it. Just as it hits the hive I would shoot the bottle and blow them up.

w00t!



Well I thought of that but decided against it for some reason.

Not being a bee guy, I hoped I had the story right. The Africanized bees aren't "killas" until they actually have a hive to protect. This is early in the season when new queens swarm off with their posse to find a place to shack up for real. They stop to rest somewhere convenient, like my tree, and take off after a day or so. This wasn't a hive so they weren't too protective.

Notice that my pic was taken from about 20 feet off though. You can't see that the door to the house was prepped for my quick retreat too.

After they left, there were 10 or 87 left behind. I went up to inspect the area they were using and one bee was indeed a killer. He attacked the brim of my hat all the way back into the house. Bonk, bonk, bonk . . .

There was a pretty good show on the whole killer bee thing on the Learning Channel. I don't suggest we all become junior bee people after seeing a one hour documentary, but it's good to have some idea what to do or NOT do.

In the desert, I'd say "Run away . . . run away!" Don't stop for about a 1/4 mile . . . A few stings aren't going to kill you unless your're allergic. Anybody that is, should have one of those anti-shock things on them at all times.

There's lots on the web. Just google "killer bees". Here's one.

Link Posted: 3/26/2006 6:47:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/26/2006 6:51:10 AM EDT by Edalicious]
Just an FYI. I read on another site that you need to wash the area the swarm was at with something but I don't remember what. The queen has left her scent there and it will continue to attract bee for many years. You might want to call a bee keeper and find out how to remove her scent to prevent any future issues.

I know exactly what would happen to me if I ran into some really pissed off killer bees out in the desert. I would get stung multilpe times and die... I'm pretty allergic to those little things!
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 7:06:44 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 1:12:24 PM EDT
That is so crazy. I was comming home yesterday and we were at a stop sign and my son said "what is that daddy?" As soon as I looked a huge cloud of bees were hauling ass right around our truck and then they were gone just as fast. I have never seen them travel so fast in my life. Pretty cool.

Last year my neightbor had a swarm just as big and the exterminator just sprayed soapy water on them and they died. Was crazy. Pissed em off for a bit though.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 3:11:49 PM EDT
Wait a minute...

You mean I blew $150 to drop a swarm that landed in my mesquite, and all I had to do was wait them out??

Dammit!
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 9:49:41 AM EDT
Well, if they're "just resting." That's usually what they're doing in the open like that, or about to move into some new digs close by. Either way, they're reasonably docile.

The main problem is that they ARE dangerous, if they get pissed off. Once they start actually building a comb, even in the open, it's probably best to get the exterminator.

It's a personal call as to just how far you want to go in giving them a chance at life . . .
Snif, snif . . . they're not really Killer Bees! They were mistreated early on . . . They can't help it . . . It's society's fault! Rehabilitate them.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 2:34:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/28/2006 2:35:04 PM EDT by High_Plains_Drifter]

Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:

You did good, cgj. They were just waiting until the scout bees found a home, in your rafters then went there. You have witnessed a miracle of nature.



Link Posted: 3/29/2006 5:04:46 AM EDT
That's exactly why I didn't get much yard work done Saturday morning. I actually SAW them go somewhere else. Believe me, there're plenty of holes in a house that was built in 1945! The place seems to resist plugging all of them up. I just saw a few places I'm going to work on anyway.
Top Top