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Posted: 8/7/2007 9:15:12 AM EDT
What makes a revocable trust legal?

Does it have to be filed with the state or notarized???
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 4:59:02 PM EDT
Anyone????
Link Posted: 8/10/2007 7:28:02 AM EDT
I have had the same question! I haven't had a lot of success researching it either. I want (as I'm assuming you might be as well) to get one for class III purchaces.
Link Posted: 8/10/2007 11:23:52 AM EDT
IC 30-4-2
Chapter 2. Rules Governing the Creation of Trusts

IC 30-4-2-1
Written evidence of terms; definite terms; validity of inter vivos trust; existence of trust beneficiaries; creation of trust by exercise of power of appointment
Sec. 1. (a) A trust in either real or personal property is enforceable only if there is written evidence of its terms bearing the signature of the settlor or the settlor's authorized agent.
(b) Except as required in the applicable probate law for the execution of wills, no formal language is required to create a trust, but its terms must be sufficiently definite so that the trust property, the identity of the trustee, the nature of the trustee's interest, the identity of the beneficiary, the nature of the beneficiary's interest and the purpose of the trust may be ascertained with reasonable certainty.
(c) It is not necessary to the validity of a trust that the trust be funded with or have a corpus that includes property other than the present or future, vested or contingent right of the trustee to receive proceeds or property, including:
(1) as beneficiary of an estate under IC 29-1-6-1;
(2) life insurance benefits under section 5 of this chapter;
(3) retirement plan benefits; or
(4) the proceeds of an individual retirement account.
(d) A trust created under:
(1) section 18 of this chapter for the care of an animal; or
(2) section 19 of this chapter for a noncharitable purpose;
has a beneficiary.
(e) A trust has a beneficiary if the beneficiary can be presently ascertained or ascertained in the future, subject to any applicable rule against perpetuities.
(f) A power of a trustee to select a beneficiary from an indefinite class is valid. If the power is not exercised within a reasonable time, the power fails and the property subject to the power passes to the persons who would have taken the property had the power not been conferred.
(g) A trust may be created by exercise of a power of appointment in favor of a trustee.
(Formerly: Acts 1971, P.L.416, SEC.3.) As amended by P.L.132-1992, SEC.1; P.L.238-2005, SEC.21.

IC 30-4-2-1.5
Trust not created by will; requirements
Sec. 1.5. (a) Except as provided in subsection (b), a trust that is not created by a will is validly created if the trust's creation complies with the law of the jurisdiction in which the trust instrument was executed or the law of the jurisdiction in which, at the time of creation:
(1) the settlor was domiciled, had a place of abode, or was a national;
(2) a trustee was domiciled or had a place of business; or
(3) any trust property is located.
(b) A valid trust must be:
(1) in writing; and
(2) signed by:
(A) the settlor; or
(B) an agent of the settlor who is an attorney in fact.
As added by P.L.238-2005, SEC.22.
Link Posted: 8/10/2007 12:48:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Cal556:
IC 30-4-2
Chapter 2. Rules Governing the Creation of Trusts

IC 30-4-2-1
Written evidence of terms; definite terms; validity of inter vivos trust; existence of trust beneficiaries; creation of trust by exercise of power of appointment
Sec. 1. (a) A trust in either real or personal property is enforceable only if there is written evidence of its terms bearing the signature of the settlor or the settlor's authorized agent.
(b) Except as required in the applicable probate law for the execution of wills, no formal language is required to create a trust, but its terms must be sufficiently definite so that the trust property, the identity of the trustee, the nature of the trustee's interest, the identity of the beneficiary, the nature of the beneficiary's interest and the purpose of the trust may be ascertained with reasonable certainty.
(c) It is not necessary to the validity of a trust that the trust be funded with or have a corpus that includes property other than the present or future, vested or contingent right of the trustee to receive proceeds or property, including:
(1) as beneficiary of an estate under IC 29-1-6-1;
(2) life insurance benefits under section 5 of this chapter;
(3) retirement plan benefits; or
(4) the proceeds of an individual retirement account.
(d) A trust created under:
(1) section 18 of this chapter for the care of an animal; or
(2) section 19 of this chapter for a noncharitable purpose;
has a beneficiary.
(e) A trust has a beneficiary if the beneficiary can be presently ascertained or ascertained in the future, subject to any applicable rule against perpetuities.
(f) A power of a trustee to select a beneficiary from an indefinite class is valid. If the power is not exercised within a reasonable time, the power fails and the property subject to the power passes to the persons who would have taken the property had the power not been conferred.
(g) A trust may be created by exercise of a power of appointment in favor of a trustee.
(Formerly: Acts 1971, P.L.416, SEC.3.) As amended by P.L.132-1992, SEC.1; P.L.238-2005, SEC.21.

IC 30-4-2-1.5
Trust not created by will; requirements
Sec. 1.5. (a) Except as provided in subsection (b), a trust that is not created by a will is validly created if the trust's creation complies with the law of the jurisdiction in which the trust instrument was executed or the law of the jurisdiction in which, at the time of creation:
(1) the settlor was domiciled, had a place of abode, or was a national;
(2) a trustee was domiciled or had a place of business; or
(3) any trust property is located.
(b) A valid trust must be:
(1) in writing; and
(2) signed by:
(A) the settlor; or
(B) an agent of the settlor who is an attorney in fact.
As added by P.L.238-2005, SEC.22.


Ok, but what does that mean?
Link Posted: 8/11/2007 6:35:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/11/2007 6:36:04 AM EDT by Cal556]
It say, "if you can't understand this, then hire a lawyer to do it for you."
Link Posted: 8/11/2007 8:01:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Cal556:
It say, "if you can't understand this, then hire a lawyer to do it for you."


See this is what I hate about law and lawyers. Just give me a simple answer to a simple question. It's easy see:

What makes a Trust legal?

It must be notarized.

or

It must be filed with the state with this department.

or

ETC... It's easy.
Link Posted: 8/13/2007 9:51:56 PM EDT
bump
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