Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/21/2005 6:07:46 PM EDT
On an ar15 I know how it works. bullet passes gas port, gas acts to move bc rearward, the cam rotates and unlocks the bolt, the b/bc continue rearward and the weapon is out of battery. Can someone give me that kind of play-by-play for a 1911?
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 8:26:15 PM EDT
Let me see if I get this right. I think it's much easier than an AR15 as far as all sorts of moving parts and such.

When the bullet is fired, there is recoil. The slide moves backward from the recoil. The whole time the slide is moving backward, it's pushing against the recoil spring. The spent brass is already locked into the extractor. As the slide moves back from recoil, the brass goes with it until the left side of the brass hit's the ejector. When the brass hits the ejector it kicks the brass out the ejection port next to the extractor. The slide continues back until it reaches the end of travel. At this time the recoil spring takes over and it starts to slide forward. As it slides forward, it chambers another round and comes to a stop when the barrel locks back into the lugs and the new round is seated.

So it's kind of a Fire, slide back from recoil, eject, stop, slide forward and chamber, repeat.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 11:43:27 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 11:45:47 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 4:27:57 AM EDT
Cool. Thanks guys. Now, my follow up question. What about this system makes it less suitable for suppresson than other pistols. How do other pistols operate that makes them different?
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:56:58 AM EDT
A 1911 is one of the most suitable pistols for suppression because the cartridge is already sub sonic. Some 1911's ware equiped with a latch that kept the slide locked during firing so the pistol was almost totally silent. After the 1911, Browning designed the 1935 (Hi Power). The 1935 did away with the swing link on the bottom of the barrel and replaced it with a steped cam lug. Most modern semi's still use the Browning design with the exception of some Beretta models. There may be more, I'm just not aware of any others.


Originally Posted By LWRC_Matt:
Cool. Thanks guys. Now, my follow up question. What about this system makes it less suitable for suppresson than other pistols. How do other pistols operate that makes them different?

Link Posted: 9/22/2005 6:07:13 AM EDT
Ok. Thanks. For some reason I was under the impression that the back pressure messes with the cycling on 1911s more than other pistols, but i guess that is not true.
Top Top