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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/7/2003 10:51:36 PM EDT
Anyone have an opinion (yeah, right) on if S&W will EVER come out with one or more long guns?

Their shotguns haven't been made since 1984, long guns were stopped in 1983, I think.

Seems like a bit of a missed opportunity, IMO.
Link Posted: 8/8/2003 3:57:18 AM EDT
They never really made any long guns. The rifles were repackaged Howas, which were concurrently imported by Weatherby and Mossberg and their shotguns were the same guns as imported by Weatherby and Savage (the Fox Models FA-1 and FP-1). I think the shotguns were manufactured by someone besides Howa.
Link Posted: 8/11/2003 11:40:24 PM EDT
I saw a picture of an M1A on one of these sites with a Smith and Wesson stamp on it. Don't know what that was all about, I just figured it had to be worth some bucks. Actually now that I think about it, it may have been a M1 Garand. Hmmm... I don't remeber now.
Link Posted: 8/12/2003 10:48:32 AM EDT
S&W has never made a Garand nor a M-14. The one you saw must've been photo shopped.
Link Posted: 8/13/2003 6:46:31 AM EDT
The shotguns they did market, at least the non-removable barrel models, were mediocre at best, from what I remember.
Trying to put a dent in a flooded market could be a beancounters worst nightmare.
I'm still suprised they jumped into the 1911 market this late and they had better be great guns to even compete with Colt, Kimber or Springfield, already well established.
Naw, I don't see it, but anything is possible.
Link Posted: 8/13/2003 11:28:31 AM EDT
Both shotgun and rifle market seem pretty well saturated and dominated by big players. Barring some remarkable new technological development on the part of Smith it would seem rather pointless. Do we really need another bolt action hunting rifle or pump shotgun?

Their prior forays were pretty ordinary. As said before, the rifles were just rebadged Howas and the shotguns nothing special.

Link Posted: 8/14/2003 8:54:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By anothergene:
I'm still suprised they jumped into the 1911 market this late and they had better be great guns to even compete with Colt, Kimber or Springfield, already well established.




How long did it take Colt to make a .44mag?????
Link Posted: 8/14/2003 8:57:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Ameshawki:
Both shotgun and rifle market seem pretty well saturated and dominated by big players.
S&W isn't a "big player"?


Barring some remarkable new technological development on the part of Smith it would seem rather pointless. Do we really need another bolt action hunting rifle or pump shotgun?
There's some would like a long gun with S&W on the side. An O&U shotgun would be my choice.


Their prior forays were pretty ordinary. As said before, the rifles were just rebadged Howas and the shotguns nothing special.
I'd say they learned a lesson that gun buyers won't pay for a POS. Maybe their Sigma line reinforced that?

Link Posted: 8/16/2003 12:36:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:

Originally Posted By anothergene:
I'm still suprised they jumped into the 1911 market this late and they had better be great guns to even compete with Colt, Kimber or Springfield, already well established.




How long did it take Colt to make a .44mag?????


Forever...but you are comparing shooting platforms to just calibers.
Colt, having been bankrupt and all, is just slow on the draw.
Link Posted: 8/16/2003 5:37:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By anothergene:
Forever...but you are comparing shooting platforms to just calibers.
Colt, having been bankrupt and all, is just slow on the draw.



Geez, don't EVEN get me started on Colt!!!

However, I would say that their Anaconda line **was** a bit of departure for them with the SS compared to what they had at the time. Which was what, nothing?
Link Posted: 8/17/2003 4:24:40 AM EDT
Colt's product line seemed to stagnate...repackaging existing products, compared to Smith's.
The Double Eagle and the All American 2000 were admitted failures along with slow sales on their budget .22 Cadet.
That can't help a cash strapped company.
Maybe they thought the long lived 44-40 cal. SAA would suffice.
Getting back to S&W...who makes long guns they could put their name on?
It would have to be an import, most likely.
And what bean counter would "sign off" on it?
That's my opinion...what's the odds AND would it be any good if they did?
Link Posted: 8/17/2003 5:45:26 AM EDT
I think it'd be a tough market find a niche today. Marlin, who was already a longgun manufacturer, tried to market a fairly nifty modern bolt gun a few years back (the MR7) and failed. I just don't see that there's much new or innovative for S&W to sell.
Link Posted: 8/17/2003 7:30:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By anothergene:
Getting back to S&W...who makes long guns they could put their name on?
...what's the odds AND would it be any good if they did?




Well, that would seem to be the $64 Question, eh?

I would doubt that S&W could come out with a run-of-the-mill bolt action deer rifle or even a .22 & be successful. However, a decent O&U in the $800 range would be attractive, IMO.

Given S&W's ability to come out with cutting edge gun materiels such as the Scandium line, I would hope that they could do the same with an O&U?

Why would it necessarily have to be a pre-made import?
Link Posted: 8/17/2003 8:13:21 AM EDT

Given S&W's ability to come out with cutting edge gun materiels such as the Scandium line, I would hope that they could do the same with an O&U?

Yeah, but the Browning Citori is pretty well established. Its few competitors don't seem to be achieving anywhere near the same sales (Red Label, Orion, Beretta, etc.).
Link Posted: 8/18/2003 5:04:58 AM EDT
Let the "dust settle" on the 500 S&W revolver first. A hot seller.
Maybe a scandium/titanium long gun would be an advantage over the competition...hmmm
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