Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/14/2005 4:39:02 PM EDT
I thought I'd ask. Which is the proper way to aim my pistol. There are dots on the front and rear sights if I line up the dots @25' it shoots low.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 4:42:07 PM EDT
Not trying to offend you, but the fact that you are asking this question means you REALLY need to get some professional training. Not a buddly "who was in the Army". You'll be amazed at how much you'll learn.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 4:43:55 PM EDT
A is the proper method. Now get some training.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 4:45:08 PM EDT
I have no problems shooting the gun and I know what works for me. I just wanted to know which was the way it was designed to work.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 4:46:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Badrat414:
I have no problems shooting the gun and I know what works for me. I just wanted to know which was the way it was designed to work.



The first thing you learn in training is how much you don't actually know. Trust me, I've been there.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 4:46:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Combat_Jack:
A is the proper method. Now get some training.



Training to me just mean money for shells and that's in short supply.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 4:55:21 PM EDT
You could buy a few cases of ammo for what decent training costs. But so what? A trained man accomplishes the same thing with less ammo. And faster, and better, and more consistently under stress. I have spent more money on training this year than guns or ammo combined.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 5:05:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Badrat414:
Training to me just mean money for shells and that's in short supply.



You'll learn much more from a day of professional training than you would spending the same money on ammo. Really. It's the first thing you should do.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 5:11:25 PM EDT
"A" is how most guns are, I have a P95 and it's the same way as yours. If I use "A" it shoots low. If I use "B" it shoots good.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 5:32:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2005 5:56:23 PM EDT by AJohnston]
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 11:59:53 PM EDT
I agree with you, just keep buying ammo and forget all that training garbage.

Learning by making mistakes and forging bad habits is what its all about!

There's nothing more rewarding than reinventing the wheel, one ignorant misadventure after another!! Rock on!

Btw, A is correct for sighting combat pistols, but don't take our word for it!
Link Posted: 9/15/2005 12:20:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/15/2005 12:25:21 AM EDT by chrome1]
While choice A is technically correct , it doesn’t
mean that B isn't what your weapon needs to put
the rounds on target where you want them .

As suggested , training is never a bad thing , but neither is practicing
with your gun on your own . As long as you are comfortable
with the sight picture and get repeatable results with it .
Then by all means keep using it .

Hitting where you aim , over and over again in the least amount
of time is what it's all about with a handgun .
Link Posted: 9/18/2005 7:09:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Badrat414:

Originally Posted By Combat_Jack:
A is the proper method. Now get some training.



Training to me just mean money for shells and that's in short supply.



Shells are for shotguns.

Go train.



Sheep
Link Posted: 9/18/2005 9:55:20 AM EDT
This reminds me of a co-worker. He does not understand the difference between training and shooting alot.

PLEASE if you are serious about shooting... get some professional training.

By "training" yourself you unknowingly teach yourself bad habits. Bad habits that will cause difficulty later when you get professional training. Things you will have to un-learn. Things that will prevent you from shooting as well as you really wnat to.

I am a firearms instructor. I'd rather teach a new student that has never shot before than a self taught shooter. I can do it quicker, I can do it with fewer sessions (= less ammo), and I can end up with a better shooter. I don't have to spend a bunch of time un-teaching incorrect technique. It is not rocket science... but their are a number of techniques that need to be learned to make it all fall into place. Basic concepts to understand. Muscle memory to build.

I have been teaching for almost 20 years. I know this is true for two reasons. I was a self taught shooter... and I had to un-learn what I did wrong. ...AND I have dealt with self taught shooters a large number of times.

I have a co-worker now I have about given up on. Why... because there is nothing I can say to get him to understand. To get him to listen. He shoots about 300 to 500 rounds of "my ammo" a month. He is not getting any better. HE IS GETTING WORSE. BUT... he thinks he is getting better. He fires about 150 rounds each "session". Putting 150 holes in paper does not make you a good shot.

It is not the quantity of rounds fired that makes a good shot. It is the QUALITY of the technique used when firing. In most cases... unless there is a specific drill is being taught... no more than 50 rounds per session should not be exceeded. Dry fire is also very important.

Do yourself a favor. DON"T now spend all your money to dump a lot of ammo down rage. Spend the money on training... then use your ammo budget wisely to build from there. Shooting thousands of round using poor techniques will be a waste of your money... and will only build muscle memory and poor techniques someone will later have to waste their time and your ammo budget correcting!

But... then again it is your life and your money... what do I know?
Link Posted: 9/18/2005 10:04:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Lockman:
"A" is how most guns are, I have a P95 and it's the same way as yours. If I use "A" it shoots low. If I use "B" it shoots good.



If it shoots low using "A"... You may be the problem. You may be anticipating the shot and jerking the trigger or pushing the gun down to anticipate the recoil.

Try this. Load a magazine. Mix in one or two empty cases. Shoot as you normally do. When you drop the hammer on an empty case... you will most likely notice the front sight dramatically dip. This will cause shots to go low. If when you hit an empty case the pistol does not move... then you are not anticipating,. I bet the pistol dramatically dips. ...and by using "B" you are compensating for incorrect technique. You are aiming high to correct for pushing the shots low by anticipating the recoil.

Humor me... before you you respond to this to tell me I am wrong... go to the range and try this drill.
Top Top