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Posted: 6/12/2008 4:57:05 PM EDT
I'm thinking about getting a GP100 as my first revolver.  

I'm just wondering, would it be worth paying the extra $$ to get a new one?  I hear a lot about getting used ones with bad timing.  

Does $475 new, $375 used sound about right?
Link Posted: 6/12/2008 5:16:30 PM EDT
A clean GP 100 would be a great first revolver. Don't worry if it has a problem as you can send it back to Ruger and they will fix it for free I believe.
Link Posted: 6/12/2008 5:56:22 PM EDT
I would opt for a NIB one for your first revolver.  It would eliminate any issues with getting someone elses headache.  

also if you get NIB, you know the history and what has or hasnt been done to the gun.
Link Posted: 6/12/2008 6:37:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 22LR:
I would opt for a NIB one for your first revolver.  It would eliminate any issues with getting someone elses headache.  

also if you get NIB, you know the history and what has or hasnt been done to the gun.


I agree - but I buy most guns new.  I don't think you'd have much trouble with a GP100 if you bought it used.  It's a solid gun.

Check the timing and the store and you should be good to go.
Link Posted: 6/12/2008 6:47:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/12/2008 6:48:44 PM EDT by machinisttx]
Unless the gun(ruger) left the factory poorly timed, it's extremely unlikely someone could put that much wear on it. Even if they did, ruger will repair it for next to nothing or free.

S&W's, particularly the K frame magnums, are much more prone to this with heavy use. With that said, I haven't run across very many that had bad timing. I do have a couple of former police guns that have seen enough use for it---one is right on the verge of being slow and the other is slow. I've also got another S&W that apparently left the factory with slow timing---it doesn't show enough use to have actually worn the parts. I believe they'll all be a cheap fix with a little elbow grease.

It's an easy check, and you'll save some $$.
Link Posted: 6/12/2008 7:01:41 PM EDT
I got a GP100 with the heavy barrel/shroud in stainless and not a problem yet with it.Used it for our local clubs handgun silhouette, and a lot of rounds thru it.Paid $325 for it new when the used were about $250 so the range is the same now with just a higher new sell price
Link Posted: 6/12/2008 7:26:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/12/2008 7:29:26 PM EDT by fishngrits]
Do it.  My GP-100 is my favorite handgun.  Built like a tank, very accurate and a blast to shoot.

I paid $475, NIB, for mine.  A fairly standard price, but I really like the shop I bought it at, so I didn't haggle over the price.
Supporting my local dealer, when I can.
Link Posted: 6/12/2008 7:28:58 PM EDT
The predecessor to the GP100 is the Six-series Ruger revolvers. You can find them used for $250-300 these days. They are just as strong  as the GP100 and will last a lifetime. I have never seen a Ruger full size .357 with a timing problem. They are built like tanks.


Security-Six and Speed-Six


Link Posted: 6/12/2008 7:54:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By P08:
A clean GP 100 would be a great first revolver. Don't worry if it has a problem as you can send it back to Ruger and they will fix it for free I believe.


+1. Ruger revolvers are tough to kill. I had a SS Security Six that developed timing problems after many, many rounds and it was an unusual case. Ruger fixed it for free (except I paid the postage to get it to Ruger. They paid the postage back and did not charge for the fix). They build tough guns and have great customer service.

The only gripe I had about both the Security Six and its tougher, more rugged GP-100 sibling - are the triggers. They are serviceable but if you are used to a S&W revolver trigger you will be disappointed. A competent gunsmith can take care of this by stoning etc. if it bothers you. Go ahead and buy it used. Only one of my Ruger revolvers was NIB and darned if it wasn't the only one I had timing problems with
Link Posted: 6/13/2008 7:17:07 PM EDT
GP100 was my first and only revolver, I like it.
Link Posted: 6/13/2008 8:02:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Greymantle:

Originally Posted By P08:
A clean GP 100 would be a great first revolver. Don't worry if it has a problem as you can send it back to Ruger and they will fix it for free I believe.


+1. Ruger revolvers are tough to kill. I had a SS Security Six that developed timing problems after many, many rounds and it was an unusual case. Ruger fixed it for free (except I paid the postage to get it to Ruger. They paid the postage back and did not charge for the fix). They build tough guns and have great customer service.

The only gripe I had about both the Security Six and its tougher, more rugged GP-100 sibling - are the triggers. They are serviceable but if you are used to a S&W revolver trigger you will be disappointed. A competent gunsmith can take care of this by stoning etc. if it bothers you. Go ahead and buy it used. Only one of my Ruger revolvers was NIB and darned if it wasn't the only one I had timing problems with


An easy fix is a Wolff spring kit. They are easy to install and make the trigger a near wet dream!
Link Posted: 6/13/2008 8:20:25 PM EDT
I may try that the next time I order from Brownell's. TYVM for suggestion.
Link Posted: 6/13/2008 9:57:25 PM EDT
4" stainless, don't look back.
Link Posted: 6/14/2008 12:36:04 AM EDT
S & W 686 Plus 4" barrel was my first choice when I was looking for a revolver but the Ruger GP100 was a very close second.  
Link Posted: 6/14/2008 12:59:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ColonelHurtz:
4" stainless, don't look back.


Link Posted: 6/15/2008 10:49:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SenorTreinteOcho:

Originally Posted By ColonelHurtz:
4" stainless, don't look back.


i218.photobucket.com/albums/cc290/LcPokerPro/Picture248.jpg

Link Posted: 6/15/2008 4:13:34 PM EDT
terrific photo BUIS!!
Link Posted: 6/15/2008 5:35:31 PM EDT
My first revolver was a 4 inch GP100.
I was very happy with it and even the wife liked it.

I would buy a new one unless you can find a used one that you know the exact history of.



Link Posted: 6/17/2008 9:41:55 AM EDT
My first new revolver was a Gp100 some 20 years ago. Wish I never had to sell it to pay rent when employer filed Chapter 11 and didn't pay us three weeks salary owed.

One thing with the older ones is don't overtighten the grip panel screw. It will crack the wood insert. I'm not sure if they changed the design.
Link Posted: 6/19/2008 7:24:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/19/2008 7:26:07 AM EDT by JAR0023]
Just picked up a used GP100 on Tuesday.  4" stainless.  Polished not brushed as the new ones are.  Clean bore, no indication of flame cutting on the topstrap. A little endshake .003, but otherwise locks up tight.  Only the faintest drag line on the cylinder.  I imediately bailed from work a hour early and shot a box of .38 through it.  Damn accurate gun.  

Best thing to me is I checked the serial # on Ruger's website.  My gun was produced in 1988 the same year as I graduated high school. I'd say they're built to last.

J


Link Posted: 6/19/2008 5:45:19 PM EDT
I have a four inch stainless Ruger GP100 in .357 Magnum. I have four. BUILT LIKE A TANK.

This is a major heavy duty revolver. You can beat and abuse it. Get a used one in good condition. You'll get it for a steal.
Link Posted: 6/19/2008 7:02:33 PM EDT


Does $475 new, $375 used sound about right?



IMO those are very good prices.

Check gunsamerica.com for that gun.

the GP100 is a fine gun to have in your arsenal. Mine shoots very well.

As for older guns having bad timing... I haven't handled enough of 'em to tell. But the way to check for bad timing is to (1) UNLOAD THE GUN, (2) cock the gun, and check for cylinder play, and (3) Squeeze the trigger, allowing the hammer to fall; WHILE YOU HOLD THE TRIGGER BACK, check again for cylinder play. There should be no play in the cylinder at that point. Barely detectable play should be OK. Any more than that is grounds to walk away from that sale.
Link Posted: 6/21/2008 6:48:31 AM EDT
New Gp100 are going up price according to a couple of delaers i spoke to..

Find a used one and shoot the heck out of it..
Link Posted: 6/21/2008 6:39:25 PM EDT
My GP100 3" is a sweet revolver! $450 new sounds like a pretty good price to me.
Link Posted: 6/24/2008 8:27:14 PM EDT
I'm still looking...

If anyone has a line on a good one, let me know
Link Posted: 6/26/2008 4:38:19 AM EDT
I have always wanted to get a GP100 with a 4" barrel, but I always put it off since I have a S&W 686, although it has a 6" barrel. The last GP100 I saw was at Sportsman's Warehouse about two weeks ago, and I believe the price tag was right @$500.00, maybe $489.00, I don't recall exactly.

A GP100 will be my next handgun purchase.
Link Posted: 6/26/2008 12:00:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Billmanweh:
I'm thinking about getting a GP100 as my first revolver.  

I'm just wondering, would it be worth paying the extra $$ to get a new one?  I hear a lot about getting used ones with bad timing.  
Does $475 new, $375 used sound about right?


I think I lifted this from this site some time ago..........


Basically the things to look for in a wheelgun are timing, barrel to cylinder gap, bent crane/yoke, buggered screws/sideplate, and peened locking bolt notches.

Timing is the easiest to check on a S&W. Make sure the gun is unloaded, then close the cylinder and exert very light pressure on the cylinder with your left thumb. Now cock the hammer slowly. The locking bolt should drop into the notch just before the hammer reaches full cock. Do this on each chamber. Also check the fore and aft cylinder play, as well as the rotational play when the gun is at full cock. Dry fire the gun once for each chamber as well to make sure the trigger pull is consistent. Lots of play = bad.

To check the barrel/cylinder gap, buy a feeler gage at your local sears or autoparts store. Barrel to cylinder gap should be from roughly .003" up to .012" max(the .012" is the maximum S&W allows). Make sure the gun is 100% clean before doing this, built up carbon on the forcing cone/breech or cylinder will cause an inaccurate measurement. Smaller numbers are more desirable.

To check for a bent or warped yoke/crane, open the cylinder and give it a good spin. If the ejector rod wobbles, that's bad. Close the cylinder and then examine the gap between the crane and the frame. The gap should be even. If it isn't, the crane may be bent---walk away now, unless you can get the gun really cheap.

The screws and sideplate are a no brainer. Check for obvious damage or fitting issues.

The locking bolt notches should have nice sharp edges. If someone has used the gun hard in D/A mode a lot, they will be peened out. These notches are the ones around the circumference of the cylinder.


Link Posted: 6/27/2008 12:53:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/27/2008 12:56:36 AM EDT by Jason280]

They are just as strong as the GP100 and will last a lifetime


I don't think I'd say they're just as strong, but they are pretty close.  The GP100 does use a larger frame, specifically up front near the barrel/lug area.  But I will say you'd have a hard time wearing out a Security Six, and an even harder time on a GP100.  Here are a couple of my 4" models:




Regardless, the GP100 and Security Six series of guns are probably some of the strongest DA .357 revolvers you can find.  They will handle loads that will make your wrist cringe, and are fantastic defense guns with 125gr HP's.  
Link Posted: 6/29/2008 7:49:23 AM EDT
I would NEVER worry about buying a used GP-100 or Redhawk.  You could throw it out a 4th floor window and all it would hurt is the sidewalk.  Built like tanks.  I put handloads through mine that would reduce a Smith & Wesson to tears.  The GP-100 is ridiculously overbuilt, compared to most guns, just the way Bill Ruger wanted it.  I've NEVER heard of a Ruger made after 1986 having a timing issue.  Buy used with confidence, just give it the normal once-over to make sure it wasn't used as a proof-load testbed.

Papajohn
Link Posted: 6/30/2008 5:27:50 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/30/2008 8:22:47 PM EDT by H2O_MAN]
I picked up a NIB 6" GP100 over the weekend - I love the grip

Link Posted: 7/8/2008 12:42:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By JohnRippert:
The predecessor to the GP100 is the Six-series Ruger revolvers. You can find them used for $250-300 these days. They are just as strong  as the GP100 and will last a lifetime. I have never seen a Ruger full size .357 with a timing problem. They are built like tanks.

Security-Six and Speed-Six


img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/johnrippert/Rugers.jpg



I cannot argue with this. I read an article about a guy who took a Security Six, DELIBERATELY ABUSED IT by throwing it around, up & down an asphault driveway, kicking it like a soccer ball, etc... and it worked flawlessly! G&A article from about 10 years ago.

I personally like the look of the GP (and I own a GP myself) but that's just me.
Link Posted: 7/9/2008 6:59:46 PM EDT
I Have FOR SALE: N.I.B. Ruger GP100 .357 Magnum, 4" Heavy Barrel, Stainless Steel,
With TWO sets of grips. Check in Equiptment Exchange - Handgun Section Thanks!
Link Posted: 7/10/2008 2:09:49 PM EDT

   Either a new one or used one you cannot go wrong with the GP100.  I would recommend that you change the hammer and trigger springs to a lighter lbs.  Not too light that may cause malfunction.   Basically the only grip I have of the gun is the trigger pull but I solved that a long time ago with spring change out from Wolf.

   I've fire full bore magnum loads many times in mine and yet have to see it hiccup.  Accurate as others have stated.  For a SHTF revolver it fits the bill.
Link Posted: 7/13/2008 4:43:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/13/2008 4:45:08 PM EDT by pdg45acp]
I'm probably the old person in the world who has broken a GP100. I won't go into details, too embarrassing.

Anyway I contacted Ruger and told them I broke it, I told them it was my fault and I would pay to have it fixed since it's my favorite revolver.

I sent it to them, they sent me a paper to sign giving them the OK to scrap it and about 2 week later the sent me a new one.. Free!!!

Edited to add: If you are going to fire full tilt boogie 357 magnum loads there is no other revolver.



Link Posted: 7/13/2008 5:15:22 PM EDT
Definitely go for the GP. Love my 3" with fixed sights.
Link Posted: 7/14/2008 3:25:20 PM EDT
"I'm probably the old person in the world who has broken a GP100. I won't go into details, too embarrassing."


Aw, now you got me curious.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 1:52:05 PM EDT
I have a 4" blued GP100.  It's the most accurate handgun that I own.  The thing's like a laser beam, man.  And it's just a joy to shoot, even with full-house .357 Magnum loads.  It's a beautiful revolver that handles great, shoots better than I can (and I qualified as a pistol expert), and doesn't cost an arm and a leg.  Mine cost less than $500.00 new.  In California.  Yeah.

Superb value, great accuracy, killer ergonomics and aesthetics.  I don't believe you can go wrong with the GP100.
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