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Posted: 9/15/2009 7:37:43 PM EST
Tried to find some old stuff on this . I know this comes up frequently. Thanks for experience and opinions.
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 9:24:22 PM EST
I like them and I use them. I know that they are unpopular and I know the reasons behind that as well. I don't know that I can necessarily say without a doubt that they are doing any good, but I like knowing that I am doing what I can to prolong the frame life without babying the pistol.

That being said, if you choose to install them, you need to be vigilant and prompt about replacing them when they begin to show signs of wear. If you fail to maintain and replace them properly, they could come apart in your pistol and induce malfunctions which is part of the reason that many people dislike them. Also realize that they actually shorten the travel of the action, which could potentially lead to problems in more finicky pistols. Also, I would only use them on a 5" Government model, but then again, that's all I have. Further shortening the travel can have a deleterious effect of shorter barreled guns, though I have not the faintest clue as to whether it would change anything in a longslide, I've simply never thought about it.

I would try to search online and find out some more about them, and opinions and reasons why some people use them and some people don't, and bear in mind the 1911 lasted quite a while before they came along.

HTH,
~Augee
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 9:51:39 PM EST
There are plenty of competition shooters who use shock buffers, and many who don't. I think there are very few top shooters, if any, who insist that a buffer is an absolute necessity in a 1911.

Those who do use them tend to use a lighter spring and mainly use the buffers to alter the feel of recoil. These guys are also switched on enough to inspect them regularly and replace them if needed.

Some guns run fine with them, some don't. I'd say Bill Wilson is in the minority when it comes to smiths recommending using them in their guns.

Here's what I think: a well-built gun won't benefit from them, and they do shorten the slide travel, which could conceivably cause problems. And in a gun that has problems, buffers won't really prevent much.

I also think that as much as they have been used over the last 10-15 years, a pretty clear consensus would have emerged if shock buffers were providing a tangible benefit. No such consensus seems to exist. On the other hand, there have been documented cases of buffers tying up a gun. And that's why I'll fool around with them in competition from time to time, but never use one in a self-defense gun.

(Reposted from something I wrote a few weeks back.)
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 5:04:35 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 8:52:43 AM EST
Originally Posted By SGB:
Waste of money


This. Spend the money on some new springs.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 10:14:57 AM EST
They cost 5 bucks, try them and see for yourself. I dont know how they could benefit anything but all I will tell you is put them in at the range. Take them out when you leave. Thats the only advice I'll give about them.

Anecdote, I personally saw one come apart and lock up the slide half way through travel. A rubber mallet requirement to get it free. The only conclusion from the autopsy was it got wedged between the side of the dustcover and the slide.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 12:43:23 PM EST
Originally Posted By wtchdr4011:
Originally Posted By SGB:
Waste of money


This. Spend the money on some new springs.




+1

eventually, they turned all 3 of my 1911s over time into jam-o-mattics or picky/finicky operating ones
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 2:05:47 PM EST
Thanks for the advice....Looks like more trouble than they are worth.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:22:23 PM EST
I've got one in my Kimber Eclipse. It runs fine but I cannot pull the slide back to load a round after the slide islocked back. I only use this weapon at the range. I would never use one in a defensive weapon. Only reason I still have one in the Kimber is it came with one installed from the guy I bought it from, and it's always run 100%. I don't want to temt chance.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 4:24:23 PM EST
I use them in my WWI vintage 1911's to keep from beating up the old girls. Cheap insurance. Would never use them in a carry gun.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 8:54:57 PM EST
They come standard on most, if not all, Wilson Combats. I think they know a little about building 1911's.

That being said the only two guns I have them in are my Dan Wesson 10mm and Wilsom Combat CQB. Both are range guns only.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 1:48:54 AM EST
Originally Posted By srothman:
They come standard on most, if not all, Wilson Combats. I think they know a little about building 1911's.

That being said the only two guns I have them in are my Dan Wesson 10mm and Wilsom Combat CQB. Both are range guns only.


And Wilson also sells extended slide stops, when He him self states they cause more maulfuntions than what they are worth. Wilson is a business man.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 1:57:09 AM EST
They won't work in my Para Ordinace P12. The pistol runs fine without it.
I get frequent misfeeds with the shok buff.


.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:02:10 PM EST
I used to run them in a Springfield and STI 2011 when I was shooting competition. I never had a problem and I was running 18.5# recoil springs and ammo at a power factor of 175. I've since stopped using them as I don't shoot nearly as much as I used to. While I didn't experience problems, I've decided that I don't need another potential problem, so I have quit using them. If you have some, try 'em out. If you don't have them, don't spend the money.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 7:56:19 PM EST
Originally Posted By srothman:
They come standard on most, if not all, Wilson Combats. I think they know a little about building 1911's.

.


sure...no argument that bill wilson and his company can build 1911s (and other firearms)

but then, i guess if I invested something that was useless i'd want to include it in w/ all my other products to give it some use
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 10:31:29 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/18/2009 11:36:00 PM EST by JCG4]
Originally Posted By wwynter:
Tried to find some old stuff on this . I know this comes up frequently. Thanks for experience and opinions.


Yes and NO...They may reduce some of the felt impact, but the gun is not any more protected. The 1911 has been around for many years and in major wars/conflicts and done just fine without them. They are an added piece that has the ability to completely jam up your gun or cause minor malfunctions. I have some and used one once. I never really felt or saw any real improvement. Why other manufactures supply their guns with them remains a mystery???

Link Posted: 9/19/2009 7:41:07 AM EST
Junk.... Change you recoil spring when needed.
Link Posted: 9/19/2009 5:44:38 PM EST
There is not a 1911 in my house that does not have and run on shock buffs. If your having problems running them I might suggest your 1911 has other issues as well. Ed Brown can't recommend them in his guns with factory ammunition because they are..... well they just don't hold up well. Wilson's blue buffs run well, extremely well. Last week I took my carry Colt Combat Elite and ran 250 rounds of Winchester white box 230 grain HPs and FMJs on one shock buff before it was replaced. Not one hick up, not one that could be attributable to the shock buff. I like a full length one piece guide rod as well.
Link Posted: 9/19/2009 6:46:41 PM EST
Thats not quite Browns statement on Shok-Buffs, he says theyre not needed in his guns because of the quality of the steel used. I thought you said hes worked very well the last time we had this discussion.



Which by the way can we have a stickied Shok Buff thread SGB?


Link Posted: 9/19/2009 7:07:12 PM EST
Originally Posted By beltfed74:
Thats not quite Browns statement on Shok-Buffs, he says theyre not needed in his guns because of the quality of the steel used. I thought you said hes worked very well the last time we had this discussion.



Which by the way can we have a stickied Shok Buff thread SGB?




Beltfed, I thought you might be more concerned with canning peaches than worrying over shockbuffs. I did say the EB's work fine for target grade ammunition and were not worth a damn for defensive grade and thats when you whipped out the EB owners manual and started flogging it around with the statement that EB said you didn't need them in a " well " made 1911.

Now before you respond I want you to know I'm wearing my 1911 tijitsu robe, so be warned.
Link Posted: 9/19/2009 8:01:46 PM EST
They do lessen wear and tear on the frame.... HOWEVER they limit (by just a small amount) the distance that the slide can come back... in theory increasing the chance of a malfunction.. also if you do not change them at the recommended interval thay may disintegrate and lock the weapon up. That said go ahead and use them at the range THEN remove them when you load your weapon for self-defense.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 9:25:07 AM EST

Originally Posted By rkba-net:
They do lessen wear and tear on the frame.... HOWEVER they limit (by just a small amount) the distance that the slide can come back... in theory increasing the chance of a malfunction.. also if you do not change them at the recommended interval thay may disintegrate and lock the weapon up. That said go ahead and use them at the range THEN remove them when you load your weapon for self-defense.

Ive never seen that proven. And no Ive never told anyone not to use them at the range. Im only saying Ive never seen it proven or how it could be proven. A high quality frame will last forever with or without ShokBuffs. If its destined to crack a Shok Buff wont save it. Atleast not where Ive seen cracks.
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