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Posted: 9/28/2023 6:36:27 AM EST
A friend was left this 22 wheel gun by an inlaw.  What can you tell me about it?  Value?

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Attachment Attached File
fnh
Link Posted: 9/28/2023 6:48:18 AM EST
[#1]
It looks like an older model 17 or K22.  It’s not a 5 screw, so it is post mid 1950s.  The diamond magna grips might indicate it is older.  Maybe 1960s.

It definitely needs cleaning up, it might be good to do a complete detail cleaning,  it’s cosmetic condition is flawed.  It is likely mechanically sound.  If so, these are excellent shooters.  


Link Posted: 9/28/2023 9:17:40 AM EST
[#2]
The value of older S&W revolvers is gaining everyday.  The pre model 17 are excellent 22 LR revolvers and are very desirable as shooters and heirlooms.
Link Posted: 9/28/2023 9:31:38 AM EST
[#3]
I've been strongly considering buying one of these, and have been tracking gun broker auctions for the last few months.

I'd say $600 to $800 for functional, cosmetically okay to good condition. A bit more for immaculate ($1000) if there is something special about it.

The Model 18 goes for a LOT more for some reason.
Link Posted: 9/28/2023 10:52:33 AM EST
[#4]
There were three iterations of the K-22 Outdoorsman which then became the Model 17

K-22 Outdoorsman (second model) 1931-1940, serial numbers  632123-682419

Model K-22 Masterpiece (second model) 1940-41 serial numbers 682420-696952

Model K-22 Masterpiece (third model, “pre Model 17) 1946-57

The pre Model 17 became the Model 17 K-22 Masterpiece in 1957 when S&W started using model numbers and continued in production until 1989.

The Pre Model 18 was a pre Model 17 with a 4” rather than 6” barrel and was introduced in 1949 and was produced until 1986 when it was replaced by a heavy barrel 4” Model 17.

Beginning in 1946 S&W started using a “K” prefix in its K frame revolvers.  In 1970 they reached K999999 and changed the format adding a number in front of and behind the “K”

1959 serial numbers included K350548 through K386804, which makes yours a Model 17 and dates to 1959.  If you open the crane and look on the frame you’ll see some assembly numbers and “Mod 17” or “Mod 17-1”.

1959 is the year S&W introduced the Model 17-1 which changed the ejector rod from a right hand to a left hand thread, and they are considered to be scarce.

The 17-2 came out in 1961, which is when they delete the trigger guard screw making subsequent revolvers “three screw” rather than “four screw” revolvers. The 17-2 also had a different cylinder stop.

The 17-3 came out in 1967 and had a relocated rear sight screw.

S&W deleted the Diamond grips in 1968.

The 17-4 was introduced in 1977 and moved the gas ring from the yoke to the cylinder.

In 1982 S&W stopped using the pinned barrel.

The 17-5 as first produced in 1988 with a new yoke retention/radius stud package.

In 1989, the Model 17 was discontinued and replaced with the Model 17-6 with a full under lug barrel and a new toke retention system in 1990. There are some early transitional 17-6s without the full under lug.

The 17-7 was introduced in 1994 with a drilled and tape frame, a different rear sight leaf and ejector.

The 10 shot alloy cylinder 17-8 entered production in 1996

——


Below are my 3rd model K-22 Outdoorsman and my 17-3 with target hammer, target trigger and target grips. The most noticeable difference other than the grips is the slight taper in the Outdoorsman barrel.





Link Posted: 9/28/2023 11:06:23 AM EST
[#5]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
There were three iterations of the K-22 Outdoorsman which then became the Model 17

K-22 Outdoorsman (second model) 1931-1940, serial numbers  632123-682419

Model K-22 Masterpiece (second model) 1940-41 serial numbers 682420-696952

Model K-22 Masterpiece (third model, “pre Model 17) 1946-57

The pre Model 17 became the Model 17 K-22 Masterpiece in 1957 when S&W started using model numbers and continued in production until 1989.

The Pre Model 18 was a pre Model 17 with a 4” rather than 6” barrel and was introduced in 1949 and was produced until 1986 when it was replaced by a heavy barrel 4” Model 17.

Beginning in 1946 S&W started using a “K” prefix in its K frame revolvers.  In 1970 they reached K999999 and changed the format adding a number in front of and behind the “K”

1959 serial numbers included K350548 through K386804, which makes yours a Model 17 and dates to 1959.  If you open the crane and look on the frame you’ll see some assembly numbers and “Mod 17” or “Mod 17-1”.

1959 is the year S&W introduced the Model 17-1 which changed the ejector rod from a right hand to a left hand thread, and they are considered to be scarce.

The 17-2 came out in 1961, which is when they delete the trigger guard screw making subsequent revolvers “three screw” rather than “four screw” revolvers. The 17-2 also had a different cylinder stop.

The 17-3 came out in 1967 and had a relocated rear sight screw.

S&W deleted the Diamond grips in 1968.

The 17-4 was introduced in 1977 and moved the gas ring from the yoke to the cylinder.

In 1982 S&W stopped using the pinned barrel.

The 17-5 as first produced in 1988 with a new yoke retention/radius stud package.

In 1989, the Model 17 was discontinued and replaced with the Model 17-6 with a full under lug barrel and a new toke retention system in 1990. There are some early transitional 17-6s without the full under lug.

The 17-7 was introduced in 1994 with a drilled and tape frame, a different rear sight leaf and ejector.

The 10 shot alloy cylinder 17-8 entered production in 1996

——


Below are my 3rd model K-22 Outdoorsman and my 17-3 with target hammer, target trigger and target grips. The most noticeable difference other than the grips is the slight taper in the Outdoorsman barrel.


https://hosting.photobucket.com/albums/h470/SDBB57/revolvers/.highres/AF3ABE61-2EDB-44C8-B9BA-E5B8199EC30E_zpslcys7goc.jpg?width=590&height=590&fit=bounds


View Quote


What a great and informative read.
Apparently @DakotaFAL is Roy Jinks’s nom de plume.
Link Posted: 9/28/2023 11:35:11 AM EST
[#6]
Thanks
Link Posted: 9/28/2023 12:40:11 PM EST
[#7]
They shoot extremely well. My Pre-17 is the most accurate pistol I own. Have him shoot it before he decides he wants to sell it. He may fall in love...
Link Posted: 9/28/2023 1:08:10 PM EST
[#8]
It's a family heirloom they don't intend to discard.  I passed along the Info.  Thanks
Link Posted: 9/28/2023 4:42:59 PM EST
[#9]
The Model 18 goes for a LOT more for some reason.
View Quote


Less model 18s made and not made since around 1985.
Link Posted: 9/28/2023 4:50:20 PM EST
[#10]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Less model 18s made and not made since around 1985.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
The Model 18 goes for a LOT more for some reason.


Less model 18s made and not made since around 1985.


17's were easy to find compared to 18's. And when I did find one in nice shape, it was out of the blue.

Attachment Attached File
17

Attachment Attached File
18
Link Posted: 9/28/2023 8:14:51 PM EST
[#11]
I just bought this one off GB. It is a few years earlier than yours. I paid a bit over $650 for it shipped and transferred.



Link Posted: 9/28/2023 8:26:09 PM EST
[#12]
The craftsmanship, handwork and polishing on the old gals come from a lost era that can only be matched nowadays by actual artists with labor that costs more then people can usually afford. Sure they can make parts to a finer tolerance but still, somewhere along the way, something was lost for over the counter everyday revolvers.
Link Posted: 9/30/2023 10:24:17 PM EST
[#13]
Model 17 that probably shipped in 1959. Swing it open and it should be marked MOD-17 there. Tough to tell from the pic but it should be a 4 screw gun, meaning there's one there in front of the trigger guard. 4 screws weren't made very long, but it doesn't make them especially valuable. You would have no problem getting $700 for that revolver around here.
Link Posted: 10/1/2023 6:06:34 PM EST
[#14]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
There were three iterations of the K-22 Outdoorsman which then became the Model 17

K-22 Outdoorsman (second model) 1931-1940, serial numbers  632123-682419

Model K-22 Masterpiece (second model) 1940-41 serial numbers 682420-696952

Model K-22 Masterpiece (third model, “pre Model 17) 1946-57

The pre Model 17 became the Model 17 K-22 Masterpiece in 1957 when S&W started using model numbers and continued in production until 1989.

The Pre Model 18 was a pre Model 17 with a 4” rather than 6” barrel and was introduced in 1949 and was produced until 1986 when it was replaced by a heavy barrel 4” Model 17.

Beginning in 1946 S&W started using a “K” prefix in its K frame revolvers.  In 1970 they reached K999999 and changed the format adding a number in front of and behind the “K”

1959 serial numbers included K350548 through K386804, which makes yours a Model 17 and dates to 1959.  If you open the crane and look on the frame you’ll see some assembly numbers and “Mod 17” or “Mod 17-1”.

1959 is the year S&W introduced the Model 17-1 which changed the ejector rod from a right hand to a left hand thread, and they are considered to be scarce.

The 17-2 came out in 1961, which is when they delete the trigger guard screw making subsequent revolvers “three screw” rather than “four screw” revolvers. The 17-2 also had a different cylinder stop.

The 17-3 came out in 1967 and had a relocated rear sight screw.

S&W deleted the Diamond grips in 1968.

The 17-4 was introduced in 1977 and moved the gas ring from the yoke to the cylinder.

In 1982 S&W stopped using the pinned barrel.

The 17-5 as first produced in 1988 with a new yoke retention/radius stud package.

In 1989, the Model 17 was discontinued and replaced with the Model 17-6 with a full under lug barrel and a new toke retention system in 1990. There are some early transitional 17-6s without the full under lug.

The 17-7 was introduced in 1994 with a drilled and tape frame, a different rear sight leaf and ejector.

The 10 shot alloy cylinder 17-8 entered production in 1996

——


Below are my 3rd model K-22 Outdoorsman and my 17-3 with target hammer, target trigger and target grips. The most noticeable difference other than the grips is the slight taper in the Outdoorsman barrel.


https://hosting.photobucket.com/albums/h470/SDBB57/revolvers/.highres/AF3ABE61-2EDB-44C8-B9BA-E5B8199EC30E_zpslcys7goc.jpg?width=590&height=590&fit=bounds


View Quote


Excellent information, thank you.
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