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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 3/12/2006 7:33:31 AM EDT
I just got 2 new Bianchi leather holsters and I’m trying to find the best way to season them before I start actually carrying with them. I’ve been doing the “pistol in a plastic bag” deal for a few days, but they aren’t ready yet. One of them is an IWB and when I tested it, I pulled pistol and holster right out of my pants. I was just wondering if there is a common method out there.

Apologize in advance if this is a dupe, but I looked around first and didn’t see any threads.
Link Posted: 3/12/2006 1:10:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/12/2006 1:11:22 PM EDT by Redbone]
A trick our firearms instructor taught us was to put the gun in a sock and holster it. Leave it in as long as possible to allow the holster to stretch. After that, add another sock if necessary. Constant drawing will also help break it in. It worked for my duty holster and for my personal IWB holster. This is a reason I realized how much I took Kydex for granted
Link Posted: 3/12/2006 6:36:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Redbone:
A trick our firearms instructor taught us was to put the gun in a sock and holster it. Leave it in as long as possible to allow the holster to stretch. After that, add another sock if necessary. Constant drawing will also help break it in. It worked for my duty holster and for my personal IWB holster. This is a reason I realized how much I took Kydex for granted hr


Wow, I was just using two sandwich bags. I didn't think that you'd need as much added thickness as a sock. Thanks a lot! I'm gonna go and swap it out now.
Link Posted: 3/15/2006 7:01:51 AM EDT
I have used a cut T-shirt and it works well. Its a little thinner than most socks and maybe a little less probable of over-stretching. Monitor your progress carefully so you don't over stretch it.
Link Posted: 3/15/2006 9:05:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ARer:
I have used a cut T-shirt and it works well. Its a little thinner than most socks and maybe a little less probable of over-stretching. Monitor your progress carefully so you don't over stretch it.



I am using a thin dress sock instead of a thick gym sock. I think it's probably about the same thickness as a T-shirt. It's better, but still a little too tight for me to start using.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 3:23:42 PM EDT
as hard as it seems to be WET IT! Yes wet it. I work with leather all the time. Make my own personal holsters that mimic the intended firearm like a mold. Soak the leather, then allow it to drip dry. WHile it is still plyable, this is gonnna be hard to do insert your weapon. FIRST spray weapon with a water repellent such as wd-40 wrap in a plastic bag maybe a baggie type that can be sealed. Work all the air out before sealing. slide weapon into the holster. Now the fun part MASSAGE theleather to the the weapon. FOrce the leather into the barrel, front sight, ejector, ports, trigger guard, slides, releases,safety, slide stops,etc. YOU will see the image of the gun as it appears. Some shading will occur with this process giving definition. Now allow to air dry....NO FORCED air, just room temperature. one to two days should do the trick.
THis will inusre a slow dry that allows the fibers to contort and a memory developes. Actuall it will become like a true fitted glove....try it you'll like it. Remember to clean the gun afterwards.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 6:27:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By robone:
as hard as it seems to be WET IT! Yes wet it. I work with leather all the time. Make my own personal holsters that mimic the intended firearm like a mold. Soak the leather, then allow it to drip dry. WHile it is still plyable, this is gonnna be hard to do insert your weapon. FIRST spray weapon with a water repellent such as wd-40 wrap in a plastic bag maybe a baggie type that can be sealed. Work all the air out before sealing. slide weapon into the holster. Now the fun part MASSAGE theleather to the the weapon. FOrce the leather into the barrel, front sight, ejector, ports, trigger guard, slides, releases,safety, slide stops,etc. YOU will see the image of the gun as it appears. Some shading will occur with this process giving definition. Now allow to air dry....NO FORCED air, just room temperature. one to two days should do the trick.
THis will inusre a slow dry that allows the fibers to contort and a memory developes. Actuall it will become like a true fitted glove....try it you'll like it. Remember to clean the gun afterwards.



I've tried this exact method on my first leather holster(Milt Sparks SS2), it worked great.
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