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12/6/2019 7:27:02 PM
Posted: 12/5/2013 12:43:01 PM EST
Just got it today. Took apart and cleaned, will shoot tomorrow. Couple of questions.

What is that yellow sear thingy I'm supposed to push down before taking the slide off actually for?

More importantly, why can't I manually engage the slide stop? I pull the slide back and it won't push up like on my Glock

It works just fine with a mag in the gun.

thanks.
Link Posted: 12/5/2013 2:50:26 PM EST
sounds like user error on the slide stop
Link Posted: 12/5/2013 3:24:37 PM EST
Originally Posted By NRA2:
Just got it today. Took apart and cleaned, will shoot tomorrow. Couple of questions.

What is that yellow sear thingy I'm supposed to push down before taking the slide off actually for? Sear deactivation lever. Allows you to disassemble the gun without having to pull the trigger.

More importantly, why can't I manually engage the slide stop? I pull the slide back and it won't push up like on my Glock Operator error? Hit it with your purse.

It works just fine with a mag in the gun.

thanks.
View Quote

Link Posted: 12/5/2013 3:36:21 PM EST
I just got one and had the same issue briefly. You have to pull the slide way back, the part that engages the cut in the slide is behind the part you push up with your thumb.
Link Posted: 12/5/2013 4:54:27 PM EST
Ok, thanks. Why wouldn't I just pull the trigger instead of fucking with that internal part? That's actually what I did the first time.

Trust me, I can pull the slide all the way back. I'll break in the gun and see how things progress.
Link Posted: 12/5/2013 5:00:55 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NRA2:
Ok, thanks. Why wouldn't I just pull the trigger instead of fucking with that internal part? That's actually what I did the first time.

Trust me, I can pull the slide all the way back. I'll break in the gun and see how things progress.
View Quote


That's what I do, I wasn't aware that you weren't supposed to.
Link Posted: 12/5/2013 5:10:35 PM EST
I got mine last week and the slide stop is really stiff and hard to engage but from what I have read its pretty common and loosens up after a couple hundred rounds.
Link Posted: 12/5/2013 5:17:18 PM EST
I just pull the trigger, I dont trip the lever
Link Posted: 12/5/2013 5:26:51 PM EST
Good on being able to pull the trigger. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't messing up the pistol. Is it some kind of safety thing? I do like that the gun seems nice and tight.
Link Posted: 12/5/2013 6:41:48 PM EST
The yellow sear deactivation lever was a request from police departments and agencies for their officers to take apart the firearm without having to pull the trigger.

Apparently the story goes that there was a lot of holes in walls in some NYPD precincts from officers having negligent discharges of their firearms while taking them apart because they left a round in the chamber or magazine inserted.

You can't do that with the sear deactivation lever because it won't go down if there is a magazine inserted, reminding you to take it out.

It also forces you to look inside the breach of the firearm to see if there happens to be a round still in the chamber.

I also like it because if your firearm gets locked up in an awkward situation, if you drop the lever it moves the sear down allowing you to take apart the firearm even if you can't pull the trigger like you have to do on other similar polymer pistols.
Link Posted: 12/6/2013 2:24:53 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TheTacticalCoyote:
The yellow sear deactivation lever was a request from police departments and agencies for their officers to take apart the firearm without having to pull the trigger.

Apparently the story goes that there was a lot of holes in walls in some NYPD precincts from officers having negligent discharges of their firearms while taking them apart because they left a round in the chamber or magazine inserted.

You can't do that with the sear deactivation lever because it won't go down if there is a magazine inserted, reminding you to take it out.

It also forces you to look inside the breach of the firearm to see if there happens to be a round still in the chamber.

I also like it because if your firearm gets locked up in an awkward situation, if you drop the lever it moves the sear down allowing you to take apart the firearm even if you can't pull the trigger like you have to do on other similar polymer pistols.
View Quote


Thanks. There will be no holes in my walls.
Link Posted: 12/8/2013 2:53:36 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TheTacticalCoyote:
The yellow sear deactivation lever was a request from police departments and agencies for their officers to take apart the firearm without having to pull the trigger.

Apparently the story goes that there was a lot of holes in walls in some NYPD precincts from officers having negligent discharges of their firearms while taking them apart because they left a round in the chamber or magazine inserted.

You can't do that with the sear deactivation lever because it won't go down if there is a magazine inserted, reminding you to take it out.

It also forces you to look inside the breach of the firearm to see if there happens to be a round still in the chamber.

I also like it because if your firearm gets locked up in an awkward situation, if you drop the lever it moves the sear down allowing you to take apart the firearm even if you can't pull the trigger like you have to do on other similar polymer pistols.
View Quote

That's so hilarious. You know, when I take apart any gun to clean it- I make sure the mag is pulled, and also make doubly sure that the chamber is empty... I thought anyone that dealt with firearms for a living would be so inclined.. Same thing as far as where I point it- situational awareness is key.. Personally, if a cop, a paid professional, with his number one enforcement tool, ever has a negligent discharge while cleaning or clearing their gun- well, IMO, he/she should be canned.. No second chances... They should have no room for error in this respect.
Link Posted: 12/8/2013 5:19:06 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/11/2013 3:30:11 AM EST by LampShadeActual]
The separate thread got deleted. Spend 5$ and be somewhat safer. Accidents happen and especially happen to internet experts. Damage avoidance suggestion:

Problem and Solution:

The endless stream of "I am a dumb ass" and finally had a negligent discharge of a firearm in my house, basement, garage, range, where have you is interesting. I think some guys brag about it like they are proud. These negligent discharges are always a result of violating the basic rules of firearms. All guns are always loaded, never point the muzzle at anything you do not wish to destroy, and keep your finger off the trigger until you have a target you wish to shoot or a safe direction for some other firearms related activity.

That said, in your house, just what is a safe direction? There basically aren't any. Follows is a simple solution with a few guidelines.

*It is a bad idea to screw with guns in the house. They occasionally go off. Loading and unloading and cycling guns is best left to the range.

**That said, virtually everyone loads their revolver at home, drops the slide on their semi auto pistol at home, or pushes the bolt release to chamber a round in their "home defense" AR. Where that muzzle is pointed, who knows??

***Spend 6 dollars. Yes, $6. Go to Home Depot, buy one of their big orange 5 gallon buckets, and buy some sand to fill it to the top. Buy the lid also. Assemble the lid to the sand bucket and take it home. Make a bullseye on the lid, little circles like a target. Make a second one on the side about half way up. Where ever you keep a gun or work on one or load one, put your bucket there.

****Label the bullseyes, A SAFE DIRECTION.

*****You have just created, when everything else in your life turns to shittt, the ability to comply with the directive to keep your muzzle in a safe direction. It says right there: A SAFE DIRECTION.

******If you load an auto pistol and drop the slide or load an AR and pop the bolt release to load the chamber, AIM the muzzle at which ever target puts your muzzle into the center of the bucket. If you dry fire, if you try an action, if you work the bolt on an empty rifle, if you pump your pump gun, AIM it at your orange bucket full of sand. Your first FUBAR may be loud and it may cost you a new bucket, but you won't hurt anyone or anything. A foot of sand stops dam neared anything. This I know because I tested it.

*******Yeah, I know, you all are such experts it could never happen. Well, it does. Remember Mr. Murphy's Law? If a thing can happen, it will. When it happens, it will always be at the worst possible time.

Lessons learned from testing a bucket of dry sand:

1. It's still fun to shoot stuff.

2. Sand is a very good barrier. Nothing shot penetrated more than 6 inches into the sand. Does that mean I would hide behind 6 inches of sand and let someone shoot at me? No way!! I'd rather have 60 feet of sand in front of me. But 6 inches seems to work pretty well for the rounds tested. No hand held or shoulder fired weapon is likely to transit the entire bucket of dry sand.

3. The pistol rounds penetrated deeper than the rifle rounds. Why? The pistol rounds held together better and didn't have enough velocity to break apart. The rifle rounds were traveling at such a high velocity that they broke up into pieces and this stopped their penetration quicker.

4. The 12 gauge slug finally met it's match with sand. The soft lead slug was flattened out and stopped quickly.

Conclusion:

We cannot cure human nature, but we can prevent damage from occurring rather cheaply. This of course assumes they can still remember to use the bucket and aim well enough to hit it.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 11:50:58 AM EST
i believe it is to prevent "glock leg"
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 1:27:28 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By LampShadeActual:
The separate thread got deleted. Spend 5$ and be somewhat safer. Accidents happen and especially happen to internet experts. Damage avoidance suggestion:

Problem and Solution:

The endless stream of "I am a dumb ass" and finally had a negligent discharge of a firearm in my house, basement, garage, range, where have you is interesting. I think some guys brag about it like they are proud. These negligent discharges are always a result of violating the basic rules of firearms. All guns are always loaded, never point the muzzle at anything you do not wish to destroy, and keep your finger off the trigger until you have a target you wish to shoot or a safe direction for some other firearms related activity.

That said, in your house, just what is a safe direction? There basically aren't any. Follows is a simple solution with a few guidelines.

*It is a bad idea to screw with guns in the house. They occasionally go off. Loading and unloading and cycling guns is best left to the range.

**That said, virtually everyone loads their revolver at home, drops the slide on their semi auto pistol at home, or pushes the bolt release to chamber a round in their "home defense" AR. Where that muzzle is pointed, who knows??

***Spend 6 dollars. Yes, $6. Go to Home Depot, buy one of their big orange 5 gallon buckets, and buy some sand to fill it to the top. Buy the lid also. Assemble the lid to the sand bucket and take it home. Make a bullseye on the lid, little circles like a target. Make a second one on the side about half way up. Where ever you keep a gun or work on one or load one, put your bucket there.

****Label the bullseyes, A SAFE DIRECTION.

*****You have just created, when everything else in your life turns to shittt, the ability to comply with the directive to keep your muzzle in a safe direction. It says right there: A SAFE DIRECTION.

******If you load an auto pistol and drop the slide or load an AR and pop the bolt release to load the chamber, AIM the muzzle at which ever target puts your muzzle into the center of the bucket. If you dry fire, if you try an action, if you work the bolt on an empty rifle, if you pump your pump gun, AIM it at your orange bucket full of sand. Your first FUBAR may be loud and it may cost you a new bucket, but you won't hurt anyone or anything. A foot of sand stops dam neared anything. This I know because I tested it.

*******Yeah, I know, you all are such experts it could never happen. Well, it does. Remember Mr. Murphy's Law? If a thing can happen, it will. When it happens, it will always be at the worst possible time.

Lessons learned from testing a bucket of dry sand:

1. It's still fun to shoot stuff.

2. Sand is a very good barrier. Nothing shot penetrated more than 6 inches into the sand. Does that mean I would hide behind 6 inches of sand and let someone shoot at me? No way!! I'd rather have 60 feet of sand in front of me. But 6 inches seems to work pretty well for the rounds tested. No hand held or shoulder fired weapon is likely to transit the entire bucket of dry sand.

3. The pistol rounds penetrated deeper than the rifle rounds. Why? The pistol rounds held together better and didn't have enough velocity to break apart. The rifle rounds were traveling at such a high velocity that they broke up into pieces and this stopped their penetration quicker.

4. The 12 gauge slug finally met it's match with sand. The soft lead slug was flattened out and stopped quickly.

Conclusion:

We cannot cure human nature, but we can prevent damage from occurring rather cheaply. This of course assumes they can still remember to use the bucket and aim well enough to hit it.
View Quote


I think I will do this on Saturday. I like the idea.
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