Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/8/2005 10:13:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/8/2005 9:16:54 PM EDT by _DR]
She lives out in the country, is in her sixties and with the hurricane and all the refugees coming close by the DFW area has finally realized that maybe she needs a handgun as a home defense measure. My Dad had a light stroke and his hands are too shaky and weak to manage a handgun. She has agreed to undergo the needed training, but wants something simple, easy to operate and maintain and manageable for a small 5"2" older woman.

I like automatics, but sounds like a small revolver will fit the bill here. I know nothing about revolvers in general. Suggestions for something that is relatively easy to handle but packs a punch in a small revolver? It will not be for concealed carry, only home defense, kept in a quick-release lock-box in the nightstand kind of handgun.

Thanks for any opinions.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 10:44:24 AM EDT
I would look into the Taurus or S&W .22 Magnum or a .32 Magnum.

Link Posted: 9/8/2005 10:44:51 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 11:13:08 AM EDT
Get her a medium sized revolver with a 4 inch barrel. Two inch barrelled revolvers are hard to shoot, especially for novices.

My number one caliber recommendation is .357. She can load it with .38 Special, which is easy to find.
The main advantage of .38 Special is the very large variety of factory loads available in that caliber. If she proves tolerant of recoil, she can load it with +P loads. If recoil bothers her, she can use light target loads such as the 148 grain wadcutters. As she grows more proficient, she can use .357. (One caution: with a medium sized revolver, do not give it a steady diet of .357. It will wear the gun excessively. I recommend 90% of practice shooting with .38, 10% with .357.)

If she is extremely sensitive to recoil, drop down to a .22 Magnum or .22 long rifle revolver.

Look for a Taurus Model 66 or similar Smith and Wesson. If finances are tight, get a used one from a reliable source. If shopping for a used firearm, take someone knowledgeable with you. Taurus has a lifetime warrantee that applies to any owner, not just the original buyer.

What are your questions?
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 11:22:06 AM EDT
I would disagree with CommoMan.

She needs something that is lightweight, but is potent enough to drop someone with the first shot.

While I like the .22 magnum ideas, if she can handle a Model 36 in .38 spl. get her that.

Best thing to do is go to the range and rent a variety of models. Whichever she can shoot without it being to heavy on both weight and felt recoil, go with that.

In fact, if you check the hometown forum, the gm for Big Town gunshows is pulling togethor a quick gun show for this weekend. Fort Worth was cancelled and the guys at Big Town stepped in.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 12:22:16 PM EDT
Purplecheese, you are certainly right about going to the range. However, I still claim that for home defense extremely light weight is not necessary and may be undesirable.

What may seem easy to handle to us may very well not be so to a novice.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 1:01:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CommoMan:
Purplecheese, you are certainly right about going to the range. However, I still claim that for home defense extremely light weight is not necessary and may be undesirable.

What may seem easy to handle to us may very well not be so to a novice.



I agree. That's why I don't think an older lady would feel comfortable with a heavy handgun like most .357s are. I say mosts... I'm not familiar with all of S&Ws revolver line, and I know there are some lightweight .357s.

From my experiences though, I have found that most women can handle a light frame .38 spl like a Model 19 or 36 chief special. They are also reliable.

I'm not thoroughly impressed with the Taurus line. Seen a few of their semi-autos have some problems (which may not spill over into the revolvers).

Being able to shoot .357 and .38 is an added bonus that I would give.

In the end though, his mom needs to find the right gun that is comfortable to shoot. Which is what I think we are both trying to say.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 1:02:23 PM EDT
revolver isn't neccecarily the best choice. I've seen a lot of women get fatigued by long heavy double action triggers. If she's willing to get training, then there's really nothing wrong with a semi auto and it may be a better choice.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 1:28:07 PM EDT
While I agree with clubsoda22, I'll throw Ruger SP101 in as an option. It's small, light, can fire anything from light .38 target loads to full power .357, and it's stainless so it's more forgiving of poor maintenance. I am absolutely not a revolver guy, but they tend to be a bit easier for the mechanically dis-inclined.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 5:09:42 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 6:16:59 PM EDT
I can't believe no one's said this yet, but here goes:

Don't buy your mom a revolver or any sort of handgun. Instead buy her a pump-action 20 gauge shotgun. Most middle aged police officers shoot their handguns at least once a month and they still can't hit diddly dick. What makes you think that your 62 year old mother with no pistol experience would be able to hit an intruder under stress? The shotgun gives more to hold onto, provides easier aiming, and will be more comfortable for your mother to handle. 20 gauge will have mild enough recoil for her as well. I'm sorry if this comes across as rude, but I just want to see you make the best choice for your mother.

Doc
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 6:47:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Bullseye_Doc_Holiday:
I can't believe no one's said this yet, but here goes:

Don't buy your mom a revolver or any sort of handgun. Instead buy her a pump-action 20 gauge shotgun. Most middle aged police officers shoot their handguns at least once a month and they still can't hit diddly dick. What makes you think that your 62 year old mother with no pistol experience would be able to hit an intruder under stress? The shotgun gives more to hold onto, provides easier aiming, and will be more comfortable for your mother to handle. 20 gauge will have mild enough recoil for her as well. I'm sorry if this comes across as rude, but I just want to see you make the best choice for your mother.

Doc



+1

I was reading this post with the same thoughts.. is no one going to tell him to get her a Remington 870 Express youth 20 gauge..
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 7:56:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/8/2005 7:59:10 PM EDT by ICEAGE]

Originally Posted By Bullseye_Doc_Holiday:
I can't believe no one's said this yet, but here goes:

Don't buy your mom a revolver or any sort of handgun. Instead buy her a pump-action 20 gauge shotgun. Most middle aged police officers shoot their handguns at least once a month and they still can't hit diddly dick. What makes you think that your 62 year old mother with no pistol experience would be able to hit an intruder under stress? The shotgun gives more to hold onto, provides easier aiming, and will be more comfortable for your mother to handle. 20 gauge will have mild enough recoil for her as well. I'm sorry if this comes across as rude, but I just want to see you make the best choice for your mother.

Doc




+2






If the shotgun idea is out I'd get her a 9mm semi auto, ya can mount a light and laser on it for her, the caliber would prolly be easier for her to control and she's have more rounds then 5 or 6.

If she's gonna get training the 9mm is prolly the best bet . Since she's willing to learn an auto wont be much harder to learn and its more tactical IMHO.


If your sold on the revolver maybe check out a .17 . More powerful then a .22 I think.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 7:56:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tvarden:

Originally Posted By Bullseye_Doc_Holiday:
I can't believe no one's said this yet, but here goes:

Don't buy your mom a revolver or any sort of handgun. Instead buy her a pump-action 20 gauge shotgun. Most middle aged police officers shoot their handguns at least once a month and they still can't hit diddly dick. What makes you think that your 62 year old mother with no pistol experience would be able to hit an intruder under stress? The shotgun gives more to hold onto, provides easier aiming, and will be more comfortable for your mother to handle. 20 gauge will have mild enough recoil for her as well. I'm sorry if this comes across as rude, but I just want to see you make the best choice for your mother.

Doc



+1

I was reading this post with the same thoughts.. is no one going to tell him to get her a Remington 870 Express youth 20 gauge..



His original question though didn't say anything about shotguns.

He asked what kind of REVOLVER to get his mom.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 8:16:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By purplecheese:

Originally Posted By tvarden:

Originally Posted By Bullseye_Doc_Holiday:
I can't believe no one's said this yet, but here goes:

Don't buy your mom a revolver or any sort of handgun. Instead buy her a pump-action 20 gauge shotgun. Most middle aged police officers shoot their handguns at least once a month and they still can't hit diddly dick. What makes you think that your 62 year old mother with no pistol experience would be able to hit an intruder under stress? The shotgun gives more to hold onto, provides easier aiming, and will be more comfortable for your mother to handle. 20 gauge will have mild enough recoil for her as well. I'm sorry if this comes across as rude, but I just want to see you make the best choice for your mother.

Doc




+1

I was reading this post with the same thoughts.. is no one going to tell him to get her a Remington 870 Express youth 20 gauge..



His original question though didn't say anything about shotguns.

He asked what kind of REVOLVER to get his mom.



She doesn't feel comfortable with shotguns, or longarms in general. We have a Remington 870P she could use, but she wants a pistol that she can feel comfortable with. She didn't state a revolver, just a handgun, but I thought though a revolver was the best because it's simplicity. Automatics require you to be aware of many more variables, and are more sensitive to being held incorrectly in order to function correctly. That's why the revolver. At her age she isn't looking to take up for any other reason than strictly self defense.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 8:16:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/8/2005 8:18:31 PM EDT by Currahee]
I'm going to plus one the idea of a medium framed .357 with a 4"bbl shooting +Ps. To light a revolver scares novices away. A shotgun would be hard to deploy in a house for an older woman and easyer to take away if she hesitates.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 8:23:50 PM EDT
This is why I honestly think a 36 would be best. My mom can handle this... she's not quite 60 but can shoot decent out to about 10' (the average room is not much larger than this).



Link Posted: 9/8/2005 8:33:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/8/2005 8:44:56 PM EDT by _DR]

Originally Posted By Currahee:
I'm going to plus one the idea of a medium framed .357 with a 4"bbl shooting +Ps. To light a revolver scares novices away. A shotgun would be hard to deploy in a house for an older woman and easyer to take away if she hesitates.



So you think a heavier revolver, because it would have less felt recoil would better than a snub nose of the same caliber, that the larger overall size would not intimidate? I had not thought of it that way. I was looking at S&W and Taurus snub nosed revolvers (1 7/8") in .38 spcl today,
thinking the 38 spcl would have less felt recoil than the .357 magnum. For actual home defense load I was thinking the new Speer Gold Dot 135gr +P .38 spcl load might be OK stopping power.

So you think just a longer revolver like a 4" might make the difference in making the +P .357 magnum tolerable for an older novice? She is certainly not frail by any means, but she has always been very wary of firearms in general, and might be intimidated by a lot of blast & recoil.

I am even considering the Taurus 905 9mm revolver, even though after handling both the Taurus .38 spcl and .357 mag next to the S&W pistols, the S&W pistols seem light years ahead in smoothness of trigger pull, positive and smooth cylider closure and overall fit and function, for not much more money.

I would really prefer a Smith if possible, but they don't do a 9mm revolver anymore and I was hoping to buy new. So that's why I was thinking .38 spcl. I'm afraid that if she is intimidated by it, she won't use it. But I won't get her a .22, .25, .32 or such, that would just be too little stopping power IMO. She has to be comfortable with it or she just won't use it, even if she needs to. She is just that stubborn.

Is .38 really that bad?
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 8:46:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By _DR:

So you think a heavier revolver, because it would have less felt recoil would better than a snub nose of the same caliber? I was looking at S&W and Taurus snub nosed revolvers (1 7/8") in 3.8 spcl today,
thinking the 38 spcl would have less felt recoil than the .357 magnum. For actual home defense load I was thinking the new Speer Gold Dot 158gr +P .38 spcl load might be OK stopping power.




It's a physics equation... the heavyer the gun the lighter the recoil with the same load. The 4" bbl also brings about a serious reduction in blast. I have a 4 inch smith 66 and a smith airweight. The 66 is quite pleasent to shoot with Whitebox +P and the airweight is simply BRUTAL.

I am completely confident in the +P as defensive load, I prefer the largest round posible (My personal piece is a G21) but the ready home gun is the 66 because my wife might need to use it.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 9:19:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/8/2005 9:20:06 PM EDT by _DR]

Originally Posted By purplecheese:
This is why I honestly think a 36 would be best. My mom can handle this... she's not quite 60 but can shoot decent out to about 10' (the average room is not much larger than this).






I was looking at that exact pistol today at Bullet Trap in Plano(at least it looked like it). A Lady Smith blued in .38 spcl for $259. Seemed like a decent price and had a nice smooth trigger.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 9:21:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/8/2005 9:22:33 PM EDT by _DR]

Originally Posted By Currahee:

Originally Posted By _DR:

So you think a heavier revolver, because it would have less felt recoil would better than a snub nose of the same caliber? I was looking at S&W and Taurus snub nosed revolvers (1 7/8") in 3.8 spcl today,
thinking the 38 spcl would have less felt recoil than the .357 magnum. For actual home defense load I was thinking the new Speer Gold Dot 158gr +P .38 spcl load might be OK stopping power.




It's a physics equation... the heavyer the gun the lighter the recoil with the same load. The 4" bbl also brings about a serious reduction in blast. I have a 4 inch smith 66 and a smith airweight. The 66 is quite pleasent to shoot with Whitebox +P and the airweight is simply BRUTAL.

I am completely confident in the +P as defensive load, I prefer the largest round posible (My personal piece is a G21) but the ready home gun is the 66 because my wife might need to use it.



Maybe I just need to rent a 66 and a snub-nosed and let her shoot them side by side.

Is this what the 66 looks like?

Link Posted: 9/8/2005 11:22:05 PM EDT


Maybe I just need to rent a 66 and a snub-nosed and let her shoot them side by side.




Best advice I could recommend. I 66 would be great (or even 686) but... but! the weight. I don't know what your mom can lift, what she can pull, etc...
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 6:19:06 AM EDT

but she wants a pistol that she can feel comfortable with



My mom is 70. She still fixes fences on her farm, bush hogs, and does most things she wants to do. My Dad passed away 10 years ago. My Mom's two pistols are a Ruger Mark II and a Beretta 21A. The ruger is for keeping in her truck or on the tractor. The Beretta is for keeping in her pocket or purse when she goes to the store. She sleeps with both of them by the bed.

Yes a .22 is not a caliber I would carry in a self-defense situation but it works for her. She's old and has some arthritis in her hands. But she is confident with those pistols. Heck, a couple of years back she killed a coyote with her Ruger.

I like your recommendation of the S&W. Whatever you get her make sure she is confident with it. Depending on her health you may want to trade to something else in a couple of years.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 7:12:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2005 7:14:13 AM EDT by Currahee]
_DR,

It doesn't specifically need to be a Mod66 that's just what I have. Any decent medium frame .357 should do. I am not up on the new lines of them, most of my experience is with the 66 and Colt Python. But, a lot of people swear by the Tauruses and the 686, other popular ones are the Ruger GP100 and Security 6 (I have a 6inch Security 6 that I love) you haven't mentioned your budget but there are less expensive ones out there, you could also probably find a decent used one.

And of course having her try them out befor purchase is a GREAT idea if you can swing it.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 10:58:50 AM EDT
Look for a used S&W or Colt police turn in 4" 38. I seriously doubt she is going to shoot a hot .357 more then one time. After that she will not want a handgun. A good used 38 S&W or colt will be inexpensive, built to last, and reliable, you can use a 110 grain +p HP or the LSWHP load. She can learn on 148 grain WC ammo. A 10 year old can handle one of these recoil wise easily. Going smaller even a Colt Det 2" special is very controllable with the correct ammo and it gives a perp basically nothing to grab. I doubt your mom will ever shoot enough to hurt one. Heck, I still slip a 40 year old dick special in my pocket occasionally and I do not feel undergunned. Buy her a couple of speedloaders to go with it and have her practice with them. Anyways it's the first few shots that count. The Small framed Colts have 1 more chamber to give 6 shots over the S&W. For 2 to 3 hundred bucks you can get a nice, older, quality revolver that has enough heft without being too heavy. And the sp101 new is a great gun also but the trigger is usually heavier in D/A then the S&W or Colt.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 5:58:11 PM EDT
I have what would be the perfect gun for her. It's a S&W model 66 with 3" barrel. It use to be my main carry piece. But a 66 with that size barrel is not the easiest gun to find.

I'd try to find something like that. A good stainless .357 revolver with a 2.5" or 3" barrel would be about ideal. It's not too heavy which would help for good balance. I'd avoid the pistols with full lug barrels as they tend to be very muzzle end heavy.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 9:36:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2005 9:37:56 PM EDT by tvarden]

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By purplecheese:
Originally Posted By tvarden:
Originally Posted By Bullseye_Doc_Holiday:
He asked what kind of REVOLVER to get his mom.



She doesn't feel comfortable with shotguns, or longarms in general. We have a Remington 870P she could use, but she wants a pistol that she can feel comfortable with. She didn't state a revolver, just a handgun, but I thought though a revolver was the best because it's simplicity. Automatics require you to be aware of many more variables, and are more sensitive to being held incorrectly in order to function correctly. That's why the revolver. At her age she isn't looking to take up for any other reason than strictly self defense.




I truely think if you take her and put a target at 15-20 yards and hand her a pistol (any pistol) and have her shoot it, then hand her a 20 gauge and have her shoot the target I would put money on it she would have second thoughts about what she would be comfortable with if...god forbid..the time comes she has to use it.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 11:48:00 PM EDT
I think a .357 will be too much for her to handle, she prolly wont like shooting it. Just my opinion, I see a lot of fellows saying .357mag. Its a pretty rough recoil for someone who dont have a strong grip I know I would never give my mother or grandma a .357 mag to defend The gun would prolly fly out their hand. (my grandma is 64).
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 11:49:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tvarden:

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By purplecheese:
Originally Posted By tvarden:
Originally Posted By Bullseye_Doc_Holiday:
He asked what kind of REVOLVER to get his mom.



She doesn't feel comfortable with shotguns, or longarms in general. We have a Remington 870P she could use, but she wants a pistol that she can feel comfortable with. She didn't state a revolver, just a handgun, but I thought though a revolver was the best because it's simplicity. Automatics require you to be aware of many more variables, and are more sensitive to being held incorrectly in order to function correctly. That's why the revolver. At her age she isn't looking to take up for any other reason than strictly self defense.




I truely think if you take her and put a target at 15-20 yards and hand her a pistol (any pistol) and have her shoot it, then hand her a 20 gauge and have her shoot the target I would put money on it she would have second thoughts about what she would be comfortable with if...god forbid..the time comes she has to use it.



True but this is prolly for in the household last resort defence. I doubt if she'll be shooting over 8 yards in a house.
Link Posted: 9/10/2005 6:39:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ICEAGE:
I think a .357 will be too much for her to handle, she prolly wont like shooting it. Just my opinion, I see a lot of fellows saying .357mag. Its a pretty rough recoil for someone who dont have a strong grip I know I would never give my mother or grandma a .357 mag to defend The gun would prolly fly out their hand. (my grandma is 64).



So what would you choose for her as far as caliber.
Link Posted: 9/10/2005 6:42:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ICEAGE:

Originally Posted By tvarden:

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By purplecheese:
Originally Posted By tvarden:
Originally Posted By Bullseye_Doc_Holiday:
He asked what kind of REVOLVER to get his mom.



She doesn't feel comfortable with shotguns, or longarms in general. We have a Remington 870P she could use, but she wants a pistol that she can feel comfortable with. She didn't state a revolver, just a handgun, but I thought though a revolver was the best because it's simplicity. Automatics require you to be aware of many more variables, and are more sensitive to being held incorrectly in order to function correctly. That's why the revolver. At her age she isn't looking to take up for any other reason than strictly self defense.




I truely think if you take her and put a target at 15-20 yards and hand her a pistol (any pistol) and have her shoot it, then hand her a 20 gauge and have her shoot the target I would put money on it she would have second thoughts about what she would be comfortable with if...god forbid..the time comes she has to use it.



True but this is prolly for in the household last resort defence. I doubt if she'll be shooting over 8 yards in a house.



You have to understand, my Mom has never liked guns at all. My Dad grew up on a farm and is very comfortable with them, but this is for her. I was shocked when she asked me to help get her into a pistol, and she is dead set against a shotgun of any caliber, so I won't push, good choice though it might be. So definitly a pistol. Just need to figure out type, caliber, model, material of frame, etc.
Link Posted: 9/10/2005 9:19:23 PM EDT
Since you said revolver that means I can not say Glock 19 or Springfield XD in 9mm so I guess I will say the smith model 66 is a good Idea. I would go with a .357 for sure that way you can go .38 if she does not like the recoil.
Top Top