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Posted: 7/14/2017 9:43:40 AM EST
I love 1911's and have more than a handful. For whatever reason my stupid brain says stay with the platform and 45.



I shoot a 9mm da/sa trigger much better in the accuracy department than my 1911's. I have a feeling it's due to the suprise break of the trigger in da and sa as i never know when it's going to break. It's just travel.distamce.


With my 1911's and lack of distance the trigger moved I would often shoot all over the place most likely by anticipating. Went shooting yesterday and found myself doing the same thing as the day/say and I would take three attempts at where I would start the pull and then it would fire as I didn't have the force necessary.

On a lark I just decided to "jerk" the trigger or just pull it, basically the opposite of being smooth. It ended up being in a lot of my groups in and I was able to get closer to the date/sa groups.

The targets are the 4*4 shoot and see kind. If I'm not keeping all rounds in each target at 7 yards I'm not happy with myself.
Link Posted: 8/17/2017 3:10:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/17/2017 3:11:27 PM EST by LostKeys45]
Originally Posted By stgdz:
I love 1911's and have more than a handful. For whatever reason my stupid brain says stay with the platform and 45.

I shoot a 9mm da/sa trigger much better in the accuracy department than my 1911's. I have a feeling it's due to the suprise break of the trigger in da and sa as i never know when it's going to break. It's just travel.distamce.

With my 1911's and lack of distance the trigger moved I would often shoot all over the place most likely by anticipating. Went shooting yesterday and found myself doing the same thing as the day/say and I would take three attempts at where I would start the pull and then it would fire as I didn't have the force necessary.

On a lark I just decided to "jerk" the trigger or just pull it, basically the opposite of being smooth. It ended up being in a lot of my groups in and I was able to get closer to the date/sa groups.

The targets are the 4*4 shoot and see kind. If I'm not keeping all rounds in each target at 7 yards I'm not happy with myself.
View Quote


Since no one responded I will.

Most likely what is happening is you're trying to break the shot the second you have the "perfect" sight picture and therefore jerking the sights off target with a bad trigger pull.

You are a human and therefore cannot hold a gun perfectly still so stop trying to break the shot when the sights are perfect. It's impossible. There will be slight wobble in your sights. Instead of focusing on pulling the trigger when you think your sights are perfect, line up the sights and focus on trigger pull.

The "AHA!" moment for most shooters is when someone else pulls the trigger for them as they align the sights. They feel like the sights are never perfect but their hits are better than them pulling the trigger.

Whenever one of my students is doing this I will shoot an entire Dot Torture Drill pulling the trigger for them (yes the entire drill so they draw and then pause so I can pull the trigger for them). Try it and you'll never blame the gun or trigger system again. It's all trigger control brother!

Obviously it goes without saying that you still need a good or acceptable sight picture but don't try to break the shot when the sights are perfect cause that's when most jerk the trigger.

I refer to this as the "pull the trigger right... NOW!" syndrome.
Link Posted: 8/17/2017 4:48:01 PM EST
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Originally Posted By LostKeys45:


Since no one responded I will.

Most likely what is happening is you're trying to break the shot the second you have the "perfect" sight picture and therefore jerking the sights off target with a bad trigger pull.

You are a human and therefore cannot hold a gun perfectly still so stop trying to break the shot when the sights are perfect. It's impossible. There will be slight wobble in your sights. Instead of focusing on pulling the trigger when you think your sights are perfect, line up the sights and focus on trigger pull.

The "AHA!" moment for most shooters is when someone else pulls the trigger for them as they align the sights. They feel like the sights are never perfect but their hits are better than them pulling the trigger.

Whenever one of my students is doing this I will shoot an entire Dot Torture Drill pulling the trigger for them (yes the entire drill so they draw and then pause so I can pull the trigger for them). Try it and you'll never blame the gun or trigger system again. It's all trigger control brother!

Obviously it goes without saying that you still need a good or acceptable sight picture but don't try to break the shot when the sights are perfect cause that's when most jerk the trigger.

I refer to this as the "pull the trigger right... NOW!" syndrome.
View Quote
Lost Keys is correct. This isn't a trigger issue but a shooter's technique issue. Align the sights, place the aligned sights on the point of aim, focus on the front sight, apply increasingly pressure until the gun goes bang. Squeeze such that the shot breaks in 7 seconds or less w/o jerking the trigger.
Link Posted: 8/17/2017 5:58:59 PM EST
A technique used at a class which was very effective to demonstrate the trigger control is more important than sight alignment is to purposely align sights with the front sight above the notch then below the notch then canted left and then canted right very slowly and carefully controlling the trigger. Much to my surprise using this technique all hits stay in the a zone and reinforces trigger control is king. As said you get perfect sight alignment then your brain says "now" and you mash the trigger jerking the shot.
Link Posted: 8/18/2017 7:26:45 AM EST
Trigger control and sight alignment sort of go together. If you are "jerking the trigger", you aren't keeping the sights aligned at the most critical time - the moment the gun goes off. Do some white-wall dry fire drills and make sure the sights do not move when the trigger breaks. Practice keeping your eyes open and watching to see where the sights are when the gun goes off (i.e. where they were right before they started to lift during recoil).

If you're shooting a 4" group at 7 yards, you still have work to do. You should easily be able to keep every round in a 2" circle at that distance - for example, one of the "dot drill" targets. I'm not trying to be a jackass and not saying I'm an expert marksman - I certainly have room to improve as well!
Link Posted: 8/20/2017 11:51:54 AM EST
For training the trigger pull. A red dot or barrel laser (laserlyte) really high lights the flaws. Of course they are NOT required, but if you ever wanted absolute proof that's the way.

It's me, not the gun. Repeat.
Link Posted: 8/20/2017 11:57:08 AM EST
Do you ever practice with the trigger dry firing? It has been helpful for me.
Link Posted: 8/23/2017 8:57:22 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/23/2017 8:58:00 PM EST by stgdz]


So this is 50 rounds each of 115g 9mm, 125g 38spl, and 230g 45 at seven yards. I shot them in that order and kinda got tired at the end of the 45 and flinched a few times. I have a laser on my carry 1911 and it doesn't move when I pull the trigger, it moves around as much as I can hold it in place when normally aiming but pulling the trigger shows no difference. I aimed at the red dot no matter what even if there was a hole in it.
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