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Durkin Tactical Franklin Armory
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Posted: 6/24/2017 3:33:14 PM EDT
Want to buy one or more to have around for grandkids to be introduced to firearms. Already have long guns covered.

What does the hive recommend for a child friendly pistol for initial training?

Grandkids range from young teens to more yet to be born

Thanks,
Link Posted: 6/24/2017 3:41:35 PM EDT
[#1]
First pistol, ruger single six.
Link Posted: 6/24/2017 3:50:33 PM EDT
[#2]
Any .22lr is a good place to start. Well I started with BB guns first and then moved up to 22's and then up to 9mm and 5.56mm when I got older. Slow progression is good. 
Link Posted: 6/24/2017 4:00:50 PM EDT
[#3]
My 11 year old boy loves the Beretta M9-22 but hates the 21A. M&P22 are nice too.
Link Posted: 6/24/2017 4:13:28 PM EDT
[#4]
I would pick a traditional single action auto like the ruger mk series buckmark or out of production guns like high standard or Colt woodsman or my favorite S&W 422. Another choice is a S&W 17,617 or 34/63 can still be shot single action and as they progress can into double action as well.
Not much of a fan of the current crop of combat trainer types with lesser quality triggers
Link Posted: 6/24/2017 4:20:32 PM EDT
[#5]
The ATI 1911-22 semi-automatic is a very solid choice, especially as it can be had for around $200 +/- with some looking around. Some might say that it may be overly complicated for novice shooters though. I would disagree based on my personal experience. I learned to shoot with a Star, Model F. Very similar fit and function to the 1911 ie exposed hammer, thumb safety, single action etc. Super pistol that I still have and shoot often, because I can. I also own the aforementioned ATI pistol and used it to train my 15 yo grandson. Was a solid choice for us, and it allows me to get in a lot of pracice for carrying/shooting my 1911 45s.

And, as we all know, 1911s rule the world when all is said and done
Link Posted: 6/24/2017 4:47:40 PM EDT
[#6]
Ruger Single Six revolver.  People who learn with single shots, bolt actions, and revolvers tend to learn to aim.  People who learn with semi auto's learn to make noise.   If it must be a semi auto one of the ruger pistols would be my preference.
Link Posted: 6/24/2017 10:53:37 PM EDT
[#7]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Ruger Single Six revolver.  People who learn with single shots, bolt actions, and revolvers tend to learn to aim.  People who learn with semi auto's learn to make noise.   If it must be a semi auto one of the ruger pistols would be my preference.
View Quote
Mods: not attacking quoted poster, just the foolish comment


What an amazingly, stereotypically, ignorant statement. Was that the way it worked out for you? I was trained by my father, a WW2 vet, who was trained in the Army Air Corp. For me, one round at a time. Ready, aim, press the trigger. Repeat as needed. As so many people here are wont to say..............training is everything. Seems to have worked out for me, my brothers, and my grandson.
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 7:18:01 PM EDT
[#8]
The mp 22 is pretty sweet. Any ruger is stone cold reliable
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 9:54:39 PM EDT
[#9]
A .22 revolver (I had a Ruger Single Six, they make a couple boxes of ammo last awhile longer than a semi auto .22).  A good Ruger MKX (Mine's a Mk1 but the later ones should be good, too) for more accuracy and more fun later.

A .38 Special revolver (M14 S&W is the best, most accurate I've ever fired).
Link Posted: 6/27/2017 8:34:07 AM EDT
[#10]
For the younger kids, something LITE.  22/45 Lite if you did not pick up on that.
Link Posted: 6/27/2017 10:07:48 AM EDT
[#11]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
For the younger kids, something LITE.  22/45 Lite if you did not pick up on that.
View Quote
I was leaning toward this.  

What makes the LITE different from a regular 22/45?  What are the pros and cons of each.  

If I'm not mistaken, doesn't each Ruger pistol use different mags?  E.g., a 22/45 mag is different than a SR-22 is different than.... is a 22/45 LITE mag different than a 'regular' 22/45?
Link Posted: 6/27/2017 10:47:37 AM EDT
[#12]
Ruger SR22?

~ 1/2 shorter than 22/45 LITE at grip
~ 7 oz lighter than the 22/45 LITE

granted, lose about 2" in barrel length... wonder how much accuracy is lost between the 2?  

but, what is the hive's thoughts on it as a trainer for grandkids?
Link Posted: 6/27/2017 2:33:29 PM EDT
[#13]
I greatly prefer to start new shooters on a pistol with a single action trigger. The light crisp trigger makes it easier to be accurate and thus both reinforces trigger control and when you are hitting you are having fun missing not so much. The current combat trainers ( m&p sr22 p22 etc) have universally bad triggers.
The true long term durability of these guns jury is still out. A proven platform like the ruger mark series buck mark or my preferences old discontinued guns like colt woodsman high standard smith 422 amongst others have long term accuracy and durability that guns only 10 or so years old do not. I recently picked up a1959 production beretta jaguar light reliable accurate and under 300 bucks.
I do not see any sense in a new gun. If you want something for which magazines are easy to find and has a good reputation while not my personal first choice the ruger seems hard to beat. Box stock they are more than adequate and as the shooter progresses can be tinkered with to be capable of standing up against even the high end European target pistols
Link Posted: 7/4/2017 5:29:42 PM EDT
[#14]
Referencing the question "why the Lite?"  Kids have difficulty holding weight out in front of them in a meaningful way.  The Lite is very light.
Link Posted: 7/5/2017 7:00:44 PM EDT
[#15]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Ruger SR22?

~ 1/2 shorter than 22/45 LITE at grip
~ 7 oz lighter than the 22/45 LITE

granted, lose about 2" in barrel length... wonder how much accuracy is lost between the 2?  

but, what is the hive's thoughts on it as a trainer for grandkids?
View Quote
The SR22 is the best semi automatic pistol for teaching small children to shoot.

It's not as inherently accurate as the 22/45 but it's plenty accurate enough.
Link Posted: 8/23/2017 6:59:39 PM EDT
[#16]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Ruger Single Six revolver.  People who learn with single shots, bolt actions, and revolvers tend to learn to aim.  People who learn with semi auto's learn to make noise.  If it must be a semi auto one of the ruger pistols would be my preference.
View Quote
That is so true! I learned how to shoot on a single shot pump "BB" gun. I shot it most days for 4 years until I was 16 and got my first firearm... a Marlin Model 60 semi-auto .22lr. Shooting that BB/pellet rifle for the single shot, then 8-10 pumps, and so on... well, it instills patience for sure, shot for shot! I had become so proficient with the BB gun that it translated right over to .22lr. 100 yard varmint shots were a cinch with that old Marlin, of which I still have and still kill varmints, only with CB caps now!
Link Posted: 9/29/2017 5:05:32 PM EDT
[#17]
I taught my young kids to shoot a handgun with the S&W M&P22 compact.  It's a great gun for this purpose.  It's very light and has a grip size that is more like a shield than a full size.  I haven't had any ammo issues either.  Eats everything I've thrown at it.
Link Posted: 9/29/2017 7:01:07 PM EDT
[#18]
Surprised no one mentioned the Ruger Bearcat.  They now have an adjustable sighted version available.  The size is a natural for kids.  

Bearcat
Link Posted: 9/30/2017 3:03:14 AM EDT
[#19]
^^^^What he said.

You'll probably wind up shooting the Bearcat more than anyone just because they're so damn fun.
Link Posted: 10/31/2017 9:03:46 PM EDT
[#20]
I'll be the odd man out- nothing finer than a Smith and Wesson Model 34 or 63 4". Beautiful and accurate little guns, perfect for small hands, highest quality, heirloom revolvers.
Link Posted: 10/31/2017 9:11:00 PM EDT
[#21]
Ruger Charger with a red dot. The biggest problem with smaller kids is the weight of the pistol after some time. If you use the Charger, it has a bipod on the front. You can extend the bipod and rest the weight of the gun on a bench. All the kids have to do is hold the grip and put the red dot on the target. Did this with my son and he loved it and always asks if we can take the Charger when we go to the range.
Link Posted: 12/10/2017 10:19:04 PM EDT
[#22]
So I went with a sr22. Similar situation only my kids not grandkids. I started a thread in the handgun discussions thread and got some great feedback that influenced my decision. I don't know how to post a link or I would. I ended up with a 3.5" because of reasons but my LGS had one with a longer barrel for sale as well, probably a 5". I can't give you a range report until after Christmas but I'll keep you posted.
Link Posted: 12/12/2017 7:35:26 AM EDT
[#23]
Ruger SR-22 pistol.  Not expensive, always works, good trigger, eats most .22LR 40 HV ammo, light, good adjustable sights.  My wife and sub-teen grandkids shoot one.  Two grip sizes.



All you probably need to know in old post.

https://www.ar15.com/forums/handguns/Beginner_Shooter_Info___Not_For_Experts___How_To_Set_Up_A_New_Pistol_You_Got_For_Christmas/4-164861/?

Safety first with children (and anybody.)

https://www.ar15.com/forums/handguns/Safe-Direction-Specs-For-Creating-A-Home-Apartment-Safe-Direction-This-Year-s-Color-Choices/4-179780/
Link Posted: 12/12/2017 8:49:14 PM EDT
[#24]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Ruger SR22?

~ 1/2 shorter than 22/45 LITE at grip
~ 7 oz lighter than the 22/45 LITE

granted, lose about 2" in barrel length... wonder how much accuracy is lost between the 2?

but, what is the hive's thoughts on it as a trainer for grandkids?
View Quote
Bought an SR22 last year with training my grandson with it when he's old enough. Thing is, I've gotten rather found of shooting it. Comes with three dots, mags are easy to load, has small and large grips that just slip on or off and the only cycling issue I recall was ammo related (a few duds). Thing is abreeze to field strip and clean.  My eldest daughter has tiny hands and loves the small grip sleeve.
Link Posted: 12/13/2017 10:56:27 AM EDT
[#25]
Dear OP,

You didn't ask and this post is not handguns.  But.........

You mention you have the "long" guns covered.  If they are in fact, long, they cost you about 5 years of learning experience with the children.  At a time when they can be taught.  The handgun inquired about is a secondary learning tool compared to the rifle.  In the early 1990's, an Anschutz Woodchucker taught my kids and, more recently, grand kids to shoot.  First with open sights and then a small red dot made it simple.  Put dot on target, pull trigger.  Very short proportional stock and about 2.5#.

The closest equivalent today is the Savage Rascal.  2.5# and very short.  The Accura-Trigger came at 2.5# pull and I wish every factory gun had a trigger that crisp and usable.

The Rascal has good set of post and aperture sights on it.  Adjustable for windage and elevation.



The sights are adjustable and are missing only index marks.  Readily supplied with a bit of fingernail polish.  If you worry about cosmetics with 5 year olds, don't bother teaching them to shoot.



Photo:  Rear sight elevation adjustment.  Index marks noted.  A quarter fits the slot.  No screwdrivers.  When done, use pliers to turn quarter gently tighter.



Photo:  Rear sight windage aperture.  The knerrled aperture unscrews to move the sight and then tightens to lock it in place.  Padded pliers tighten it to avoid accidental movement.  Or fiddling by little fingers.  If the polish dot is broken, something happened.



Photo:  25 yards with CCI Blazer 40 grain round nose high speed.  Only ammo tried.  10 shots.  5 in the center hole.  Not bad on a cold and windy day.  The Blazer is a good cheap reference ammo.  Most other 40 grain round nose high speed ammo's shoot within its group size.

For starting kids out, CB caps make almost no noise and limit range.  Not especially accurate, but useful.

Besides being useful, Savage is nearly giving them away.  Dick's and Cabelas have sales on them in the $129 range.  Savage has a $50 rebate.  Best $79 you will ever spend.

With young children, middle children, and especially cocky young teenagers, impressing them with the destructive power of a pee-ant looking .22LR takes some thought.



Photo:  Pick an object about the size of their brain and let them examine it.



Photo:  You carefully pop it dead center with a .22LR HV HP.



Photo:  Let them examine the result.

Then ask them if they can put it back together again.  They get the idea.
Link Posted: 12/13/2017 9:44:53 PM EDT
[#26]
I’ve taught my two sons, nieces, and other young kids to shoot a handgun. One or two liked the “cowboy gun” best ( Singl Six). But nearly all the rest preferred the S&W 422/622.  When you factor in actually hitting the target, they all lik the 422/622.

Kids also like reaction targets. Small balloons on a tomato stake are ideal. They know instantly when they make a hit.
Link Posted: 12/16/2017 10:00:16 AM EDT
[#27]
For small(ish) hands, the Ruger Bearcat is an outstanding choice.  Especially the model with the adjustable sights.

They have all of the safety features that Ruger Blackhawks are famous for.

Even grown-ups enjoy shooting Bearcats.

Mine has become my go-to 22 for woods carry.

MLG
Link Posted: 1/16/2018 4:41:16 AM EDT
[#28]
Single Action Revolvers- Ruger Single Six or Bearcat.  If tight budget Heritage Rough Rider
Double Action Revolver- S&W 34/63 4" or 17/617 4-6", Ruger SP101 3-4"
Single Action Auto- Smith 422, Browning 1911-22

Good luck in your search and purchase.

CD
Link Posted: 3/10/2018 10:40:08 PM EDT
[#29]
Old thread, with some new info. Unless you are a real snob, and don't have an open mind.....get a Heritage Rough Rider.22  # RR22B4 it's a .22 only......no need for the .22 cylinder. On sale with coupon from their Dunham's website.....$125, but it ends March 31, 2018. Don't know how they can sell them at this low price, just look at the reviews on YouTube. Being a revolver it can shoot .22 LR,L,S, and CB caps! Depending where you live, you might want to get a .22 bullet trap too. Best bang for the buck I've run across in a long time!
100% made in the U.S.A.
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