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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 6/4/2003 3:59:16 PM EDT
Deciding on what to get as a first hand gun, for security and at the range, like to get right into it, not looking for a small starter pistol, thanks
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 5:04:28 PM EDT
Recoil

Ever read about someone who wanted to adjust the sights on their new Glock, Sig, H&K, 1911?

Right handed shooter says gun hits low left/left handed person claims gun shoots low right...NOT this is our inability to control our reaction to recoil.

Practice, practice, practice. None better than a 22 Long Rifle rim fire. As soon as all bullets fired are in the 10 ring its time to move up the power band. Ever know a person who did not need to train to recoil?
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 6:38:10 PM EDT
What type of pistol are you looking for? Your information is a little vague in that area. There are so many different types with varying actions, calibers, and price tags, not to mention other little details. Is there any particular brand that you are interested in?
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 7:17:58 PM EDT
To learn the basics of grip, sight picture, and trigger control few handguns can beat a 4'bbl S&W Mdl 17 22LR.

My usual weekly range trip always includes my carry piece and my Mdl 17 and then whatever other gun I feel like shooting that day.
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 7:58:21 PM EDT
I know i am 1911greg but I would say CZ75 cheap and accurate.
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 8:50:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KODoc:
To learn the basics of grip, sight picture, and trigger control few handguns can beat a 4'bbl S&W Mdl 17 22LR.

My usual weekly range trip always includes my carry piece and my Mdl 17 and then whatever other gun I feel like shooting that day.



I gotta agree with KODoc. A .22 LR revolver is the way to start. Learn the basics [cheaply] and move up in caliber later.
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 9:32:30 PM EDT
Start with a double action revolver. 357 is a good caliber and you can shoot mid-range wad cutters until you're ready to move up in the power range. Leave the semiautomatic pistols alone for now, too many accidental discharges with beginners(and pros too, that's why you see drums of sand in police stations)
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 12:41:51 AM EDT
The natural progression would be .22 caliber revolver (Smith and Wesson or Taurus with 4" barrel would be ideal), then when that's mastered a 4" barrel .38 special and after that perhaps a 9mm. I rarely recommend semi-autos to newbies for the same reasons mentioned in previous posts. Just get something simple and learn it before progressing to more powerful and complicated designs. No matter what you are doing, it's always best to learn to crawl before walking. That also applies to firearms.
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 3:21:30 AM EDT
Perhaps you could expand on your previous level of training and experience with firearms in general and handguns in particular.
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