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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/24/2003 6:14:55 PM EDT
I have just acquired a New Navy Double action colt,it is a second issue in .38 spec!

It is Army marked not (USN) and six inch (not three inch) so the really high collectable value is lost,but it does have a very low ser #(31XX)!

Now that that info is out of the way,the question I ask is why does the first and second issue of this revolver revolve left(the cylinder)as opposed to every-other colt made?

The side plate of course is on the right,just a mirror image of other colt revolvers!

Anybody?

Bob
Link Posted: 9/25/2003 10:51:15 PM EDT
Blue Book says Model 1892 New Navy/Army (2nd Issue) were made from 1892-1907. It says the differences were dbl cyl notches, dbl locking bolt, shorter flutes, square cyl release catch.

I'm guessing that perhaps the military specified they wanted the rotation to the left?

100% condition is $1,350; 80% is $500.

Sorry, this is the best I can do.
Link Posted: 9/26/2003 10:10:34 AM EDT
The early Colt's were built in an era when the double action, swing-out cylinder design was still very new, and nobody was sure just what was the best method of operation.

Colt experimented with the counter-clockwise rotation, then finally decided that clockwise rotation would force the cylinder and crane into the frame for a stronger lock-up.

With that experience in mind, Colt changed all newer designs to the now familiar counter-clockwise system.
Link Posted: 9/26/2003 9:12:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/26/2003 9:17:52 PM EDT by bobbyjack]
Thanks Bob,and Faris

Faris if what you say is true the Smith&Wesson left rotation would be considered weak!

I personally think S&W make better revolvers!

But all Colt revolvers from the earliest times(black powder included)right revolution!

Still wonder what would process them to go left revolution unless they were trying to make their war time revolvers in sinc with the other Smith revolvers! (to avoid confusion)!

And it wasn't just new it was the first Colt swing out cylinder!

Some body at colt would know I just can't find any written text as to why?


Thanks Guys Bob

Link Posted: 9/28/2003 8:49:19 AM EDT
Actually, Colt developed the first DA swing-out revolvers, and there's at least SOME truth to the stories that S&W used features like counter-clockwise rotation and a push to open cylinder latch because they worked the opposite of the Colt's.

They needed to be different in some areas, or so goes the tales, and there WAS the patent issues, since Colt had a lock on the swing-out design for a few years.

The early Colt design DA lockwork dictated the counter-clockwise cylinder rotation. For whatever reason, the early lockwork was developed, and the cylinder rotation followed that, not the other way around.

Again, this was early days for the swing-out revolver, and Colt was experimenting, so was S&W.
Link Posted: 10/3/2003 10:38:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By faris:
Actually, Colt developed the first DA swing-out revolvers, and there's at least SOME truth to the stories that S&W used features like counter-clockwise rotation and a push to open cylinder latch because they worked the opposite of the Colt's.

They needed to be different in some areas, or so goes the tales, and there WAS the patent issues, since Colt had a lock on the swing-out design for a few years.

The early Colt design DA lockwork dictated the counter-clockwise cylinder rotation. For whatever reason, the early lockwork was developed, and the cylinder rotation followed that, not the other way around.

Again, this was early days for the swing-out revolver, and Colt was experimenting, so was S&W.



Not the other way around? What does that mean all colts black powder revolvers 36 cal and 44 all revolved to the right just like pythons and
andacondas do today!

Jezz no help at all!

thanks anyway,is this the actuall chicken and the egg!

think not Bob
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