Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 1/7/2003 8:56:44 AM EST
I have a colt python elite 6'. Bought it new about 3 months ago. Up until this past weekend, I only shot it single action. I tried double action and am getting light pin strikes 50% of the time. In single action the trigger is so light the wind could shoot this pistol. Could the light s/a trigger pull have anything to do with the light strikes in d/a? In double action, the hammer doesn't go back as far before release as it does when it is cocked for single action. All responses appreciated.
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 9:28:05 AM EST
Quick story about Colt 4-shooters:
6-8 years ago I purchased 2 Colt 38 special MK VI revolvers thru the NRA Instructors program. To make a long story short, 4 months later after it's third trip back to the factory they replaced one pistol entirely and I promptly got rid of it. The other was fixed the first time back and was purchased for my mom, she still carries it daily, but sounds to me as if the nit-wits they had working triggers there are still employed.

I got all manner of excuses, but IMHO it came down to idiots at the factory, (I mean the first time the pistols were return'd they included 40 spent cartriges from each pistol and without even removing the brass from my pistols' bag I found lite hits on the primers and still had a consistent 4-5 shooter when it was supposed to be a 6-shooter.

As a owner of a 70s model Colt Python, I can honestly say none of the new (90s to date) pistols from Colt or S&W can ever hope to compare with the old ones. It's the most accurate pistol I own, save except possibly for that late 60s Model 29, 8 3/4" S&W, but then it's new in the original box and never been fired......

My take on your post,
Mike
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 12:08:47 PM EST
The Python uses a "V" shaped mainspring which, unlike the S&W design, does, in fact, influence both the da and sa pull weights. It is one of many reasons why not just anyone should attempt to tune the Python action. While there are various little "tricks" to lighten the pull and maintain reliability (I have fired Pythons with 5-6lb. da pulls that would pop wadcutter primers all day) I would suggest you send it back to them. The sa pull weight for a duty-capable revolver should always be capable of supporting the loaded gun's weight without firing. Target guns are, of course, exceptions to this rule.
Top Top