Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Posted: 6/14/2008 12:40:01 PM EDT
My father passed away a short while ago, and while it was a very sad ordeal, one of the firearms that he had was a new Colt Python 4 inch model.

if I had to guess, this pistol has had less than 100 rounds through it. I shot it today and actually liked the feel of the gun, but I didn't like the grip or the sights.

I know these are pretty valuable, especially in the condition this one is in. If I keep it as a "user" I'm likely to want it modified from its original (re: current) condition.

Question: Do you modify a pistol worth about $1500-1700 or do you keep it original?

For what its worth: Dad wouldn't give a hoot about keeping it "original". He got it from his father when he died and just never shot it. My grandfather had 4 "like new" 357's when he died. He kept one in his cars and a couple around the house. All loaded. All without permits. I think it is VERY likely that he NEVER shot the Python.
Link Posted: 6/14/2008 1:16:00 PM EDT
yes by all means...Please BUBBA the thing
Link Posted: 6/14/2008 1:43:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By panhndl:
Question: Do you modify a pistol worth about $1500-1700 or do you keep it original?


Answer: Only if you want to destroy its value.
Link Posted: 6/14/2008 4:07:35 PM EDT
height=8
yes by all means...Please BUBBA the thing


good point. I checked. This one was made in 1972ish.

I'll just buy a different set of grips and call it good.
Link Posted: 6/14/2008 4:48:11 PM EDT
Do you give a hoot about keeping it original?

BTw, unless you do machining on the frame, the sights can be swapped back.

so. If you want a shooter and something to actually play with, i would change it to fit you. Its your gun.

another thing, unless you have the original box, paperwork and such, the value is only a shooter anyway.


Link Posted: 6/15/2008 10:35:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 22LR:
.
.
another thing, unless you have the original box, paperwork and such, the value is only a shooter anyway.
Not true, it will probably be worth maybe ~$50-$100 less, but it is still a pretty valuable gun.

It is my feeling that any changes to the factory original will decrease it's value. If you have it re-blued, it's value will be reduced. Modify the internals to get the straight through trigger pull of the S&Ws will reduce its value. Any deviation from the configuration when it left the factory will reduce it's value. Remember Colt will not be making any more of them.
Link Posted: 6/15/2008 5:30:32 PM EDT
I had a beautiful matched pair of 4 inch Pythons and did not like the grips or sights.
After checking out the limited choices of grips and sights,
I sold them and replaced them with a pair of S&W's that I could put grips and sights that I liked on, and still had some money left over.

Link Posted: 6/18/2008 6:36:31 AM EDT
I ignored the Colt Python sitting in the case last year and to this day I regret not purchasing it. The bluing was so deep and perfect it was hard to ignore but I did. I was just plain stupid that day. I shouldn't have let that $1300 price tag scare me.
Link Posted: 6/18/2008 10:29:32 AM EDT
It's a colt, hack away.

If it were a S&W, I'd say no.
Link Posted: 6/18/2008 11:00:51 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/18/2008 10:29:34 PM EDT by Mike_Mills]
Changing the grips shouldn't alter its value at all. They are easily user-replaceable. Just keep the original grips in the original box.

When I went looking for my first firearm, I was appalled by the prices ($200 for a S&W). Then I made the mistake of picking up a Python. $350 later, I was the owner of a brand new 4" barreled, stainless steel Python.

Mine is a shooter. It has had multiple thousands of rounds through it.

It remains my favorite firearm.


ETA - I could be wrong about those prices. I could be off by 2X. I'll have to get the receipt out and see what I paid. That will be fun to find out.
Link Posted: 6/18/2008 3:28:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By dragongoddess:
I ignored the Colt Python sitting in the case last year and to this day I regret not purchasing it. The bluing was so deep and perfect it was hard to ignore but I did. I was just plain stupid that day. I shouldn't have let that $1300 price tag scare me.
Wow,

Mike_Mills: According to our local Python guru Dfariswheel, the walnut grips are worth ~$200, so don't loose them if you decide to change to another set of grips. I changed my factory wood grips over to Pachmyers, but the Pachmyers have the silver Rampant Colt logo, my factory walnut have the gold logo.
Link Posted: 6/18/2008 5:02:37 PM EDT
Thanks for all the replies. I've purchased some new grips for the gun. What I don't like about the sights is the black on black. I prefer something like dots or at least a white line on the front blade.

As for the condition of the gun...it is essentially perfect. I found 2 spots on the bottom of the barrel about the size of a pin head each that were slightly less blue than the rest of the gun. Water mark of some type is my guess. Other than that, very hard to tell if its ever been fired.

I have no box or original information on the gun.

Its just a nice, pretty, expensive gun my father received from his father. I think I'll shoot it a while to see if I can come around to the sights. If not, maybe I'll have a little work done on it.
Link Posted: 6/18/2008 10:31:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By warlord:
Mike_Mills: According to our local Python guru Dfariswheel, the walnut grips are worth ~$200, so don't loose them if you decide to change to another set of grips.

As I said, be sure to keep the originals but don't be afraid to swap them out for a pair that makes the firearm better for YOU.

I changed my factory wood grips over to Pachmyers, but the Pachmyers have the silver Rampant Colt logo, my factory walnut have the gold logo.

I have the same black rubber ones on mine. They fit me like a glove.

Link Posted: 6/18/2008 10:59:55 PM EDT
maybe some paint on the front sight... I would think it would come off easy enough to not ruin it's value...
Link Posted: 6/19/2008 2:12:58 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/22/2008 5:44:40 AM EDT
There is a collector's reasoning, and a shooter's standpoint. Guns were made to be shot, if they do not give me the performance that I expect, I alter them to my liking, or sell them.

Guess, I am a shooter and not a collector that does a bad investment into firearms.
Link Posted: 6/22/2008 7:15:35 AM EDT
I am a shooter also. I acquired my Python about 4 years ago. My son and I finally shot it last year.

There is not much to do to improve the Python except for the most skilled shooters. The action is very nice - one must be a specialist on that action improve it or repair factory perfect. As stated, sights are interchangable...but careful not to scratch. The grips AND grip frame are big, so if you have small hands, nothing short of major surgery will help much.

With all the good S&W 686, 586's and Ruger GP 100's out there for relatively little, I see no sense in cobbling a perfectly collectible revolver. The Python is a piece of history...something to be used occasionally and enjoyed for its history as the epitome of American revolver making. They don't make 'em like that anymore...unless you go custom. And I'm not a big Colt revolver fan. I'd change the stocks and let it go at that.

My opinion, and I swear also a gun is made to be shot and used.
Link Posted: 6/24/2008 8:55:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By machinisttx:
It's a colt, hack away.

If it were a S&W, I'd say no.


Not really sure I follow this logic unless you're referring to some rare model triple-lock.

Colt Pythons are my favorite revolvers, although I only own a dozen S&W's, some Colt SAA's and a few Pythons. Personally I have no problem changing out the grips and saving the originals (it's probably a good thing in order to keep the originals cherry) The sights I tend to leave alone to avoid marring any surfaces of that rich royal blueing with an oopsie.
Link Posted: 6/25/2008 2:44:18 PM EDT
Grips are changed. Now on to the sights.

Don't worry, I'll let a pro do them.
Link Posted: 6/28/2008 12:51:32 PM EDT
I am not sure where your getting the $1500-$1700 at? 95%+ Royal Blue 4" Pythons would be more in the $900-$1200 range but regardless, if your going to keep it till your dying days, then the hell with the value, make it what you want it to be. If you may sell it in a couple years if times are tough or you want a new toy, then don't even fire the thing. Put it away as is
Link Posted: 7/4/2008 5:56:43 AM EDT
Changes like the grips are reversible. A friend of mine borrowed my Python for target competitions and got Pachmayr grips for it, with the Colt emblems. I find them better suited for shooting than the original grips but they don't look as nice.

My last acquisition is a 1969 Korth with custom fitted grips. They were made for a dwarf and since there are no grips for the pre '85 models available, I decided to make my own grips as close to the original as possible. It's a keeper and it is a shooter despite the fact that new ones cost over $5,000 now, with much less time invested in fit and finish.

Link Posted: 7/4/2008 11:58:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Andyd:
.
.
My last acquisition is a 1969 Korth with custom fitted grips. They were made for a dwarf and since there are no grips for the pre '85 models available, I decided to make my own grips as close to the original as possible. It's a keeper and it is a shooter despite the fact that new ones cost over $5,000 now, with much less time invested in fit and finish.
You really got a Korth? I've only seen picture of them. Are they really better than a Python?
Link Posted: 7/4/2008 7:55:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/4/2008 7:56:26 PM EDT by Andyd]
I got a deal on one. I only waited twenty some years for it!

In my opinion, yes, the quality is far superior to the Pythons I have seen or own.

The sideplate is fitted so well, that I can just guess where it is. Even though the gun has been used quite a bit, the polishing and blueing is more than equal to the old midnight blue of older Colts.

Problem is, that there are no grips for the old Korth frames available anymore so I have to make my own since the gun came with horrible target grips. I am working on that.

This one will be one for the range - unlike my Python. The Python cannot do anything that my old S&W M14-2 can't do but looks nicer. All emotions aside, the Korth can probably not do more than my old K-22, either.
Link Posted: 7/6/2008 10:04:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By machinisttx:
It's a colt, hack away.

If it were a S&W, I'd say no.





So....tell me where your loyalties really lie...
Link Posted: 7/14/2008 7:16:53 PM EDT
I think since you are probly going to keep this in the family the dollar value is of no meaning, its a family peice. Just keep the original grips and sights and fit it to your needs. I'm sure your dad yould be happy your putting it to good use.
Link Posted: 7/15/2008 8:05:09 PM EDT
I know exactly where you're coming from...I have a Python that Dad passed down to me after I (finally) recently graduated from some form of higher education. It was the first centerfire pistol i ever shot--many years ago. He had received it from one of his uncles at a time when dad couldn't afford shooting, much less an entire pistol. Dad then moved to Alaska where he carried the Python with him through three years of hunting and fishing in the Bush.

A very meaningful, very well made piece that is used, carried, and meant to be worn like a second skin. If your dad was anything like mine, shoot that pistol until it falls apart. Use it to teach a kid/newbie/significant other the joys of shooting.

Of course, with a Python, you just might ruin them for life.

Link Posted: 7/20/2008 6:44:12 PM EDT
I really don't understand the prices people want for these guns. It's not like they are hard to find. Gunbroker had 3 pages of them for sale.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 11:32:14 AM EDT



Originally Posted By machinisttx:
It's a colt, hack away.

If it were a S&W, I'd say no.
Top Top