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Posted: 3/5/2011 8:02:46 AM EST
Hey guys, I got a bushing tool, but I'm still having difficulty reassembling my 1911. Takedown is no problem, only difficulty I have is when I put everything back together.

Method I've been trying is having everything put together and then shoving the long spring into the 1911 with my thumb while trying desperately to rotate the bushing into position. Only problem... is that sometimes the bushing gets stuck! I think it often refuses to rotate due to positioning of the slide. Is that what I'm doing wrong? It's frustrating because I have the rear of the gun pressed against me to keep it stable and this drives the slide into a position where the bushing becomes "locked".
Link Posted: 3/5/2011 8:09:41 AM EST
Did you engage the thumb safety to keep the slide from retracting?
that will help you some.
Link Posted: 3/5/2011 8:15:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/5/2011 8:18:59 AM EST by skipsan]
I'm having a little problem envisioning what you're doing, so I'll describe the way "I" do it, right or wrong. Unloaded obviously, with the backside of the pistol against something firm but not abrasive so-as not to scratch something. Pistol pointed toward ceilng. Safety glasses on.

Barrel bushing seated flush in slide, rotated full CW ( looking down the muzzle) at about the 8 o'clock position. Rotate the bushing a "tad" ccw so that it's edge is directly adjacent to the spring plug hole. Push the recoil spring plug home ( kind like stuffing a wet noodle up a wildcat's posterior) and press it a wee bit below the slide with your thunb. Just a slight rotation of the barrel bushing CC with your other thumb should trap the spring plug and allow you to relax and comfortably use the bushing wrench to further rotate the bushing to it's 6 o'clock straight down position.
Link Posted: 3/5/2011 8:44:56 AM EST
Originally Posted By skipsan:
I'm having a little problem envisioning what you're doing, so I'll describe the way "I" do it, right or wrong. Unloaded obviously, with the backside of the pistol against something firm but not abrasive so-as not to scratch something. Pistol pointed toward ceilng. Safety glasses on.

Barrel bushing seated flush in slide, rotated full CW ( looking down the muzzle) at about the 8 o'clock position. Rotate the bushing a "tad" ccw so that it's edge is directly adjacent to the spring plug hole. Push the recoil spring plug home ( kind like stuffing a wet noodle up a wildcat's posterior) and press it a wee bit below the slide with your thunb. Just a slight rotation of the barrel bushing CC with your other thumb should trap the spring plug and allow you to relax and comfortably use the bushing wrench to further rotate the bushing to it's 6 o'clock straight down position.


That sounds good. Unless it is really tight you should be able to do it without a wrench.
Link Posted: 3/5/2011 9:33:37 AM EST
Originally Posted By skipsan:
I'm having a little problem envisioning what you're doing, so I'll describe the way "I" do it, right or wrong. Unloaded obviously, with the backside of the pistol against something firm but not abrasive so-as not to scratch something. Pistol pointed toward ceilng. Safety glasses on.

Barrel bushing seated flush in slide, rotated full CW ( looking down the muzzle) at about the 8 o'clock position. Rotate the bushing a "tad" ccw so that it's edge is directly adjacent to the spring plug hole. Push the recoil spring plug home ( kind like stuffing a wet noodle up a wildcat's posterior) and press it a wee bit below the slide with your thunb. Just a slight rotation of the barrel bushing CC with your other thumb should trap the spring plug and allow you to relax and comfortably use the bushing wrench to further rotate the bushing to it's 6 o'clock straight down position.


So if there's resistance to turning it CC with the wrench, it's alright to just muscle it in because it's tight? I was worried I was assembling the rest of the 1911 wrong making it difficult to do so. I actually did try using the safety to lock the slide from moving too far back, but in that position... it's extremely difficult to move the bushing in any direction lol.
Link Posted: 3/5/2011 9:48:36 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/5/2011 9:52:25 AM EST by GLADIO]

Originally Posted By Johnson184:I actually did try using the safety to lock the slide from moving too far back, but in that position... it's extremely difficult to move the bushing in any direction lol.

something sounds wrong..

This may help:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=RBhk2LKE8_c#t=204s
Link Posted: 3/5/2011 10:01:03 AM EST
Originally Posted By Johnson184:
Originally Posted By skipsan:
I'm having a little problem envisioning what you're doing, so I'll describe the way "I" do it, right or wrong. Unloaded obviously, with the backside of the pistol against something firm but not abrasive so-as not to scratch something. Pistol pointed toward ceilng. Safety glasses on.

Barrel bushing seated flush in slide, rotated full CW ( looking down the muzzle) at about the 8 o'clock position. Rotate the bushing a "tad" ccw so that it's edge is directly adjacent to the spring plug hole. Push the recoil spring plug home ( kind like stuffing a wet noodle up a wildcat's posterior) and press it a wee bit below the slide with your thunb. Just a slight rotation of the barrel bushing CC with your other thumb should trap the spring plug and allow you to relax and comfortably use the bushing wrench to further rotate the bushing to it's 6 o'clock straight down position.


So if there's resistance to turning it CC with the wrench, it's alright to just muscle it in because it's tight? I was worried I was assembling the rest of the 1911 wrong making it difficult to do so. I actually did try using the safety to lock the slide from moving too far back, but in that position... it's extremely difficult to move the bushing in any direction lol.


Assuming the bbl bushing is properly seated in the slide, threes nothing wrong using a little muscle rotating the bushing with a wrench CCs from about 8 o'clock to it's to it's proper 6 oclock position. Some brands are notoriously tight, others are finger tight. Given the choice, tight is good.
Link Posted: 3/5/2011 10:14:55 AM EST
You could also attempt putting the slide, barrel and bushing together off the frame. Then insert the spring and guide rod in place, wrapping your fingers around the open bottom of the slide to keep the spring from getting loose as you guide the slide assembly onto the frame.

It's not particularly easy but it might work for you.
Link Posted: 3/5/2011 10:26:26 AM EST
Originally Posted By skipsan:
Originally Posted By Johnson184:
Originally Posted By skipsan:
I'm having a little problem envisioning what you're doing, so I'll describe the way "I" do it, right or wrong. Unloaded obviously, with the backside of the pistol against something firm but not abrasive so-as not to scratch something. Pistol pointed toward ceilng. Safety glasses on.

Barrel bushing seated flush in slide, rotated full CW ( looking down the muzzle) at about the 8 o'clock position. Rotate the bushing a "tad" ccw so that it's edge is directly adjacent to the spring plug hole. Push the recoil spring plug home ( kind like stuffing a wet noodle up a wildcat's posterior) and press it a wee bit below the slide with your thunb. Just a slight rotation of the barrel bushing CC with your other thumb should trap the spring plug and allow you to relax and comfortably use the bushing wrench to further rotate the bushing to it's 6 o'clock straight down position.


So if there's resistance to turning it CC with the wrench, it's alright to just muscle it in because it's tight? I was worried I was assembling the rest of the 1911 wrong making it difficult to do so. I actually did try using the safety to lock the slide from moving too far back, but in that position... it's extremely difficult to move the bushing in any direction lol.


Assuming the bbl bushing is properly seated in the slide, threes nothing wrong using a little muscle rotating the bushing with a wrench CCs from about 8 o'clock to it's to it's proper 6 oclock position. Some brands are notoriously tight, others are finger tight. Given the choice, tight is good.


Bingo! If the bushing is seated correctly at approximate 8:00 o'clock position don't be afraid to use tool to turn counterclockwise to seat it.

Link Posted: 3/16/2011 9:19:31 AM EST
Late but wholehearted thanks to you guys. Ya, I just had to out some muscle into it. Apparently all ed browns are really tight. Makes me wonder how people maintain their 1911s without a bushing wrench!!!
Link Posted: 3/16/2011 10:00:04 AM EST
Originally Posted By Johnson184:
Late but wholehearted thanks to you guys. Ya, I just had to out some muscle into it. Apparently all ed browns are really tight. Makes me wonder how people maintain their 1911s without a bushing wrench!!!


Decided to learn on an Ed Brown did you? Be careful not to idiot scrath it or John Browning will pistol whip you from the dead!
Link Posted: 3/16/2011 10:46:44 AM EST
Originally Posted By Johnson184:
Late but wholehearted thanks to you guys. Ya, I just had to out some muscle into it. Apparently all ed browns are really tight. Makes me wonder how people maintain their 1911s without a bushing wrench!!!


yep. I have to use my wrench on the Brown as well.
Link Posted: 3/16/2011 10:53:21 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/16/2011 10:58:56 AM EST by Nakanokalronin]
Originally Posted By Johnson184:
Late but wholehearted thanks to you guys. Ya, I just had to out some muscle into it. Apparently all ed browns are really tight. Makes me wonder how people maintain their 1911s without a bushing wrench!!!


Most "GI" 1911s have bushings you can turn by hand. If it was too tight, the front rounded part of the floor plate on a GI magazine was used to depress the plunger and rotate the bushing.

This is a good sight for 1911 beginners: http://www.sightm1911.com/

You could even use a spent case as an emergency recoil plug

Link Posted: 3/16/2011 11:47:55 AM EST
Strangest thing the bottom of a Mil-Spec magazine has a lip on the front that fits the bushing groove.
Link Posted: 3/16/2011 3:29:11 PM EST
Originally Posted By rod727:
Strangest thing the bottom of a Mil-Spec magazine has a lip on the front that fits the bushing groove.


Most "GI" 1911s have bushings you can turn by hand. If it was too tight, the front rounded part of the floor plate on a GI magazine was used to depress the plunger and rotate the bushing.


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