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Posted: 12/30/2003 3:39:38 PM EDT
"tx for the interesting photo. i would like you to rescan the photo of the tail
at 300 dpi - it is presently at 150 dpi."

i sent the guy this picture, what exactly does he want me to do? enlarge? darken?

Link Posted: 12/30/2003 3:47:54 PM EDT
Dots Per Inch.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 3:49:50 PM EDT
dots per inch He is asking for you to scan it over again, at a higher sampling rate. The scanner "sees" everything as a pattern of dots. How many dots determines how fine of detail it can make out. He might want higher dpi so he can enlarge the photo without it losing as much quality. You could just resample it with photoshop and sent it to him again. But that wouldn't be as good as scanning it at a higher resolution. Scanning it at 300 DPI vs 150 DPI could potentially double your filesize, but if you save it as a jpg or gif it would shrink down some.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 3:50:17 PM EDT
He wants you to rescan it at a higher resolution. Of course, you'd have to have the source picture to do this as it can only be done at the time of scanning. Most any scanner nowadays should be capable of scanning at well over 300 dpi, which by the way is about the lowest you'd want to go for printing. --ZERO
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 3:50:51 PM EDT
He wants you to increase the resolution of the photo. Most typically for printing purposes. Images for the web dont need high resolution, but images for printing do.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 3:59:09 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Jakezor: Scanning it at 300 DPI vs 150 DPI could potentially double your filesize, but if you save it as a jpg or gif it would shrink down some.
View Quote
Actually, it would quadruple the file size (approx). dpi is dots wide x dots tall. So, 2 times as many dots wide x 2 times as many tall = 4 times as many dots.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 4:03:42 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 4:09:49 PM EDT
It's dots of ink per inch , the higher , the better.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 4:12:42 PM EDT
Originally Posted By tax_monster:
Originally Posted By Jakezor: Scanning it at 300 DPI vs 150 DPI could potentially double your filesize, but if you save it as a jpg or gif it would shrink down some.
View Quote
Actually, it would quadruple the file size (approx). dpi is dots wide x dots tall. So, 2 times as many dots wide x 2 times as many tall = 4 times as many dots.
View Quote
Oops my bad, tax_monster is right.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 4:35:34 PM EDT
Pixel size is as, if not more important than DPI. I print images that are anywhere from 20 to 50 megs in size everyday and most are only 72 to 100 DPI and they are as clear as if you were looking at them in person. Try scanning in 32bit CMYK mode if possible, you should get better results over RGB. Try lines per inch as well if your scanner has that option. Here's some more info on that subject [url]http://desktoppub.about.com/cs/intermediate/a/measure_lpi.htm[/url] Scanning is definitely a trial-and-error process. Good Luck.
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