Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
PSA
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 12/29/2006 5:54:16 PM EDT
anyone else have one?

I bought a Logitech laser mouse which I like..

my mouse pad was getting kinda worn and it effected the mouse performance.

I bought a mousepad specificly for optical mice thinking that it would be ok for laser.

(and I didn't see any laser specfic pads)

tracking on the optical pad is worse than my worn pad.

if you have a laser mouse, what are you using for a pad?
Link Posted: 12/29/2006 5:55:20 PM EDT
Laser tag.

(Get it?)
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 5:35:31 AM EDT
so, none of you have a laser mouse?
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 5:36:18 AM EDT
What is a "laser"?
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 5:39:11 AM EDT
I just got a logitech MX600 to repalce an older logitech optical i was using, the litle fet on the optical were worn down and wouldnt read wortha crap. I just use my desk surface to run mine and works fine.
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 5:40:43 AM EDT
I never use a pad for my optical mouse.
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 5:51:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By HarrySacz:
I never use a pad for my optical mouse.


+1.  I have a Logitech G5 gaming mouse (was a gift from a friend about a year ago).  Just sits on my desk and tracks fine.  
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 5:59:24 AM EDT
I use a laser mouse on all my computers.... (home/work)

I use them without a mousepad...  they seem to work better that way.
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 6:05:11 AM EDT
I am not sure if an optical mouse is not the same as a laser mouse. But  I can tell an optical mouse will not track with the darn on a painted surface. But most desk have that imatation wood surface and like the above posters, never have had a lick of trouble on this type of surface. Loose the mouse pad if you can.
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 6:13:02 AM EDT
A sheet of typing paper will work well as a pad if your desk is not enabling your mouse. A sheet of paper with writing on it may work even better to help the laser to sense motion.  And Happy New Year to all of you...
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 6:13:07 AM EDT
I kinda like the padded surface, but oh well, will give just the desk a try.......I'll see how it performs with a little on-line HALO action
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 12:32:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2006 12:32:49 PM EDT by Hipster]
I use a Microsoft Laser Mouse with a 3M Precise Mouse Pad - mostly out of habit.  I had the pad before I got the laser mouse and got used to the gel wrist support.  Although sometimes I'll turn the pad sideways so I'm not using the gel part.  

The mouse works great with this pad or on the bare (fake woodgrain) desk surface.  

Link Posted: 12/30/2006 12:44:41 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 12:46:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CARFan:
What is a "laser"?



A LASER (from the acronym of Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) is an optical source that emits photons in a coherent beam. The term has since entered the English language as a standard word, laser, losing the capitalization in the process. The back-formed verb to lase means "to produce laser light" or possibly "to apply laser light to". [1]

In analogy with optical lasers, a device which produces any particles or electromagnetic radiation in a coherent state is also called a "laser", usually with indication of type of particle as prefix (for example, atom laser.) In most cases, "laser" refers to a source of coherent photons, i.e. light or other electromagnetic radiation.

Laser light is typically near-monochromatic, i.e., consisting of a single wavelength or color, and emitted in a narrow beam. This contrasts with common light sources, such as the incandescent light bulb, which emit incoherent photons in almost all directions, usually over a wide spectrum of wavelengths.

Laser action is explained by the theories of quantum mechanics and thermodynamics. Many materials have been found to have the required characteristics to form the laser gain medium needed to power a laser, and these have led to the invention of many types of lasers with different characteristics suitable for different applications.

The laser was proposed as a variation of the maser principle in the late 1950s, and the first laser was demonstrated in 1960. Since that time, laser manufacture has become a multi-billion dollar industry, and the laser has found applications in fields including science, the defense industry, industry, medicine, and consumer electronics.


Link Posted: 12/30/2006 12:49:04 PM EDT
I have a Logitech MX600 and don't use a mousepad.  Works great.
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 12:58:34 PM EDT
Logitech G5 here.  Good mouse.
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 1:03:34 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 1:03:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Ponyboy:

Originally Posted By CARFan:
What is a "laser"?



A LASER (from the acronym of Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) is an optical source that emits photons in a coherent beam. The term has since entered the English language as a standard word, laser, losing the capitalization in the process. The back-formed verb to lase means "to produce laser light" or possibly "to apply laser light to". [1]

In analogy with optical lasers, a device which produces any particles or electromagnetic radiation in a coherent state is also called a "laser", usually with indication of type of particle as prefix (for example, atom laser.) In most cases, "laser" refers to a source of coherent photons, i.e. light or other electromagnetic radiation.

Laser light is typically near-monochromatic, i.e., consisting of a single wavelength or color, and emitted in a narrow beam. This contrasts with common light sources, such as the incandescent light bulb, which emit incoherent photons in almost all directions, usually over a wide spectrum of wavelengths.

Laser action is explained by the theories of quantum mechanics and thermodynamics. Many materials have been found to have the required characteristics to form the laser gain medium needed to power a laser, and these have led to the invention of many types of lasers with different characteristics suitable for different applications.

The laser was proposed as a variation of the maser principle in the late 1950s, and the first laser was demonstrated in 1960. Since that time, laser manufacture has become a multi-billion dollar industry, and the laser has found applications in fields including science, the defense industry, industry, medicine, and consumer electronics.




What is an "acronym"?
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 1:05:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CARFan:

What is an "acronym"?



It's a word that means the same thing as another word.
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 1:06:55 PM EDT
I have a few laser mice. I use metal and hard plastic pads, made by ALLSOP. works great.

Soft pads confuse the laser.
Link Posted: 12/30/2006 1:09:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Ponyboy:

Originally Posted By CARFan:

What is an "acronym"?



It's a word that means the same thing as another word.


Thanks, now I'm tracking like a VCR!
Top Top