Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 10/2/2004 7:43:14 PM EST
the claims is that they give better fuel efficiency and more horse power. That show Trucks on Spike was talking about them.
Do they perform as claimed?
www.boschusa.com/AutoParts/SparkPlugs/PlatinumPlus4/
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 7:51:54 PM EST
Not sure, but Bosch has a Performance Guarantee to refund your money...no questions asked if you don't like their product.

Don't believe all the hype of premium plugs. The only advantage of platinum is that it last longer. The advantage of multiple electrodes is the spark plug last longer by maintaining the optimum gap.

The + 4 was Bosch's answer to the 100,000 mile plug. Always change plugs by the manufacter's interval.

A spark plug is a very simple part.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 7:54:17 PM EST
I got them in my Impala, I replaced the Splitfire Platinums that were in it with them.

They seem to do decent.


Changing plugs in a LT1 sucks
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 7:56:06 PM EST
the only difference i found in them is they work better in motors where the sparkplugs and in the top of the head (i.e. import 4 bangers,hemi,and geo prizms)
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 8:01:29 PM EST
Pure hype. Most of them don't even come close to being symmetrical in electrode gap. You end up with only one marginal discharge path instead of 4. Some of the best plugs I have ever used in 20 years of hot-rodding and road racing are plain NGK's.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 8:02:46 PM EST
I use them in my pickup, they work better than the AC Delco platinums, For better results you should change over your air filter to a K&N. They seem to work better as a package.

More Air+better spark =better performance
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 11:15:55 PM EST
The difference between the bosch platinum +4 plugs and a standard plug or a platinum plug is the life of the plug. The bosch is a true 100,000 mile spark plug. Electricity is like water in that it follows the path of least resistance, but at the same time the spark will only go to one electrode. So what ends up happening is that the spark will groun to the electrode with the least resistance, until that electrode builds up resistance, then the spark will go to a different electrode. (For those of you who dont know, the Bosch +4platinum plugs have 4 grounding electrode.) What I have learned about the +4 plugs is that they are a good plug to use when plug access is limited, but they dont resopnd well ro octane boosters or higher octane gasoline so I would stay away from these plugs in a performance application.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 11:34:54 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 1:11:39 AM EST
I put them into my BMW 5 years ago. Made a BIG difference over the twin electrode Bosch that came out of it. More responce, better starting & revs like hell.

BUT they are not recommended for my F250 Super Duty. Those engines have 100,000 mile plugs and have to be ever so carefully torqued in or you'll waist the head. What are you driving? I have put the +4's in many cars & they were great.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 3:10:48 AM EST

Originally Posted By lambchops:
Electricity is like water in that it follows the path of least resistance, but at the same time the spark will only go to one electrode. So what ends up happening is that the spark will groun to the electrode with the least resistance, until that electrode builds up resistance, then the spark will go to a different electrode.



This is only true in a pure DC circuit. A more accurate statement would be, electricity follows the path of least impedance. An automotive spark arc is not DC, it is a rapidly rising pulse that will seek the electrode/ground path that has the least impedance. This path may be to the electrode that is farther away and has more resistance. Where the arc travels is a function of both resistance and capacitance.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 6:55:11 AM EST

Originally Posted By ClayP:
Pure hype. Most of them don't even come close to being symmetrical in electrode gap. You end up with only one marginal discharge path instead of 4. Some of the best plugs I have ever used in 20 years of hot-rodding and road racing are plain NGK's.



There's a lot of truth to that statement.

I was able to pick up around 10 horses by indexing my spark plug gaps so the gap is toward the exhaust valve. Since this is the hottest part of the chamber and has the worst burn properties you get a more even/comnplete burn by lighting this area first. This gives more HP and fuel efficiency. A 4 electrode plug may mimic this effect to some degree, but if you are getting only one spark path, it will end up hurting you.

You really can't feel an improvement until 10-15 horses. I got that with an engine that was pushing over 500hp to start with. I could measure it from my elapsed times, but most people won't see it from a set of plugs. Get some Moroso indexing washers from Summit Racing Equipment and some NGK's.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 7:19:10 AM EST
I use the regular Bosch platinums in my 1989 Toyota. Never had any cause to use (and pay more for) the +4 plug. I tune the truck up once a year, right before hunting season.

One time I tried Nippon Denso plugs, because everything else electrical under the hood of my Toyota is ND.

My truck ran WORSE after installing new tune-up components and the ND plugs than before I did the tune up. So I yanked the ND plugs out and took 'em back to Auto Zone and paid more to exchange them for Bosch platinum. Put them in and the truck ran like it was supposed to.

I haven't tried NGK because I get such good results from the Bosch I currently use, though a buddy of mine that drives a Subaru SWEARS by them.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 7:22:40 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 7:35:40 AM EST
You can start a fire with a match or a blowtorch. Either way, a fire will start. I use stock plugs.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 7:36:21 AM EST
By the time one electrode is burned up the others will be fouled by the same crap that caused the first electrode to get fouled up, or else it will be covered in the crap from the first electrode that burned up.

When they first came out for motorcycles they had problems with the electrodes breaking off after they had gotten fouled up.
Bosch fixed the problem.

I'll stick with NGK's.



Originally Posted By lambchops:
The difference between the bosch platinum +4 plugs and a standard plug or a platinum plug is the life of the plug. The bosch is a true 100,000 mile spark plug. Electricity is like water in that it follows the path of least resistance, but at the same time the spark will only go to one electrode. So what ends up happening is that the spark will groun to the electrode with the least resistance, until that electrode builds up resistance, then the spark will go to a different electrode. (For those of you who dont know, the Bosch +4platinum plugs have 4 grounding electrode.) What I have learned about the +4 plugs is that they are a good plug to use when plug access is limited, but they dont resopnd well ro octane boosters or higher octane gasoline so I would stay away from these plugs in a performance application.

Link Posted: 10/3/2004 10:41:29 AM EST
Been running the same set for 3 years now.

No issues.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 10:53:14 AM EST
Electricity will follow the path of least resistance so there's no way you'll get multiple spark out of one of these pluge. The spark will go the the electrod with the least resistance, period. If that electrode gets fouled or burnt then the spark may go to the next one but you'd just be better off with a single electrode plug. Platnium is good but multi-electrodes= gimmic, don't waste your money.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 11:10:43 AM EST
In a truck application, Champion truck plugs or NGK's have worked well for me.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 11:27:30 AM EST
Lots of variables....... but as stated, seems to work better in imports or small engines....

Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:52:17 PM EST

Originally Posted By Kaliburz:
Lots of variables....... but as stated, seems to work better in imports or small engines....




Many of which use Hemispherical chambers so the open gap at the top may help to some degree. Flame travel still con't be good around those 4 electrodes, though.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:57:13 PM EST
Got 'em in my 99 Merc Village(aka Nissan Minivan), I can feel a slight difference but enough to warrant the increase in price of a normal spark plug. I'm going to leave 'em since I bought and paid for it already, but I probably won't buy new ones.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:59:30 PM EST
This thread is worthless without dyno results.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 9:24:19 PM EST
I've never used platinum. But I use the next step up. Iridium ultra fine plugs by NGK. I haven't dyno'ed my car with them. But I have noticed a bit more response and power. I like'em.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 9:37:42 PM EST

Originally Posted By CnA:

Originally Posted By lambchops:
Electricity is like water in that it follows the path of least resistance, but at the same time the spark will only go to one electrode. So what ends up happening is that the spark will groun to the electrode with the least resistance, until that electrode builds up resistance, then the spark will go to a different electrode.



This is only true in a pure DC circuit. A more accurate statement would be, electricity follows the path of least impedance. An automotive spark arc is not DC, it is a rapidly rising pulse that will seek the electrode/ground path that has the least impedance. This path may be to the electrode that is farther away and has more resistance. Where the arc travels is a function of both resistance and capacitance.



Methinks CnA is onto something there.

One more thing you forgot, CnA. It's a "SPARK" plug. It creates a plamsa in the cylinder by cusing a static discharge through the fuel-air mixture. Electrical discharges and the related plasma are typically initiated at microscopic defects and/or sharp edges in the cathode surface which cause regions of increased electric field intensity. This region of high field strength can be more important than simple electrode spacing in determining the necessary breakdown.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 9:38:27 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/3/2004 9:39:08 PM EST by 87gn]
Get NGKs. Bosch plugs foul FAST. The only way you'd get horsepower out of them is by changing them for a new set.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 11:12:55 PM EST
The fucking plus 4's melted 2 ENGINES in my 91 esocrt, they were made for my car. To cut a long story short, never buy bosch plugs.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 12:21:27 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 12:22:50 AM EST
I tried the double platinums in my mortocycle, but it seemed like less performance that the old plugs. I went back to NGKs the next time I had the cover off, and all was good.

My smog guy told me to never use platinums on older engines. He smogs a lot of cars, and said they are too hot for old motors.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 12:24:03 AM EST

Originally Posted By mejames:
I tried the double platinums in my mortocycle, but it seemed like less performance that the old plugs. I went back to NGKs the next time I had the cover off, and all was good.

My smog guy told me to never use platinums on older engines. He smogs a lot of cars, and said they are too hot for old motors.



I run Bosch supers in my 78 TA it runs well with them.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 1:09:27 AM EST

Originally Posted By CnA:

This is only true in a pure DC circuit. A more accurate statement would be, electricity follows the path of least impedance. An automotive spark arc is not DC, it is a rapidly rising pulse that will seek the electrode/ground path that has the least impedance. This path may be to the electrode that is farther away and has more resistance. Where the arc travels is a function of both resistance and capacitance.



Hmmmmmmm

Actually a more accurate statement is that electricity follows ALL paths to ground .
Kirchoff's Laws cover this indirectly . More specific to automotive ignitions would be the "Greatest Gap Theory"

The problem is that in a modern automotive ignition coil , be it segmental bobbin wound ,
lamstock , etc . They will ionize a gap and produce an Arc by capacitance alone . No conventional ground at all . Here is waveform capture of a capacitance firing event on the left , and a normal grounded event at 5 Micro seconds per division:



the oscillation is the energy being dissipated back into the coil windings , Its called ring back .

Not to here , but this is something I know a little about , and the point I'm trying to make is that unless you have redesigned the combustion chamber of your engine . The plugs that came in the engine when you bought it were designed for that configuration . You can upgrade to a more durable electrode design , like platinum or Iridium , but other then that your pretty much wasting money .
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 1:38:24 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/4/2004 1:41:22 AM EST by chrome1]

Originally Posted By Taxman:

Originally Posted By mejames:
I tried the double platinums in my mortocycle, but it seemed like less performance that the old plugs. I went back to NGKs the next time I had the cover off, and all was good.

My smog guy told me to never use platinums on older engines. He smogs a lot of cars, and said they are too hot for old motors.



I run Bosch supers in my 78 TA it runs well with them.



Bosch Supers are Copper core non platinum , Great plugs .

Bosch platinum’s ( Single Electrode ) cheepy’s on the other hand are JUNK .

mejames smog guy is an idiot misinformed . Electrode material has nothing to do with temp rating , unless he was talking about bosch platinum’s (Cheepy’s) In which case he's even more wrong because they were some of the coldest running plugs every designed . That’s their problem , they foul easily because they don't get hot enough to burn off insulator deposits .
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 1:45:57 AM EST
I know the Supers are copper. I had heard platiums were not the best for an older engine
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 2:21:31 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/4/2004 2:22:07 AM EST by chrome1]

Originally Posted By Taxman:
I know the Supers are copper. I had heard platiums were not the best for an older engine



Good Plats with the same specs as the original plugs will give you a longer service life because they erode at a slower rate .

The problem is that Older , (and were talking the days of Points) .
Vehicles needed other adjustments long before the platinum plugs became a problem .
Anything with electronic ignition will handle the longer service life of plats with no problem .
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 2:42:12 AM EST
I've gotten good results in several cars with platinum plugs.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 9:16:47 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/4/2004 9:40:16 PM EST by Mr_Jimmy_Fly]

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
This thread is worthless without dyno results. h.gif



My thoughts exactly. Anyone who can "feel" the difference between two different spark plugs (assuming they both are firing correctly) has a much more sensitive ass than mine. I run the Bosch +4 in my 95 Nissan Pathfinder, not because I thought I would gain more horsepower but because of reliability. I want a spark plug that fires first time every time and lasts at least 60k miles. The +4 stands four more chances to fire than a coventional plug, assuming the center electrode is'nt burned away or fouled. My vehicle starts easy and runs good but has'nt come close to getting away from me yet due to abundance of horsepower.


Electrode material has nothing to do with temp rating , unless he was talking about bosch platinum’s (Cheepy’s) In which case he's even more wrong because they were some of the coldest running plugs every designed . That’s their problem , they foul easily because they don't get hot enough to burn off insulator deposits .


I believe spark plug temperature is directly related to driving habits ie. length of trip, speed ect. Platinum has a lower electrical resistance and is a better conductor of electrical current. Resistance, wether it be in the spark plug, plug wire, rotor button or distributor cap is what causes your coil(s) to fail and/or causes a misfire. Something to think about when installing those pretty bright yellow aftermarket plug wires that are two feet too long.


svtfast: The fucking plus 4's melted 2 ENGINES in my 91 esocrt, they were made for my car. To cut a long story short, never buy bosch plugs.


Here is a man that done "melted" two engines running the Bosch +4's, I would say they were running pretty durn hot to do that kind of damage.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 9:28:08 PM EST

Originally Posted By chrome1:
mejames smog guy is an idiot misinformed . Electrode material has nothing to do with temp rating , unless he was talking about bosch platinum’s (Cheepy’s) In which case he's even more wrong because they were some of the coldest running plugs every designed . That’s their problem , they foul easily because they don't get hot enough to burn off insulator deposits .



I think the mistake was probably mine. It was a few months ago when I was getting my truck smogged, and he probably said colder and I just got it wrong. Sorry.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 10:29:36 PM EST

Originally Posted By Mr_Jimmy_Fly:
I believe spark plug temperature is directly related to driving habits ie. length of trip, speed ect. Platinum has a lower electrical resistance and is a better conductor of electrical current. Resistance, wether it be in the spark plug, plug wire, rotor button or distributor cap is what causes your coil(s) to fail and/or causes a misfire. Something to think about when installing those pretty bright yellow aftermarket plug wires that are two feet too long .



svtfast: The fucking plus 4's melted 2 ENGINES in my 91 esocrt, they were made for my car. To cut a long story short, never buy bosch plugs.


Here is a man that done "melted" two engines running the Bosch +4's, I would say they were running pretty durn hot to do that kind of damage.



Rather then explain exactly why and how a spark plug gets it heat rating , I'll just say :

You’re entitled to your opinion ..........
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 5:16:07 PM EST
I melted a set of AC42 tapered seat plugs during a hot nitrous run. ANY detonation can hammer a plug fast regardless of the engine requirements and style.
Top Top