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Posted: 7/16/2010 2:13:56 PM EDT
I have been looking around a little bit and am thinking of maybe buying a $500 or $1000 bill. I would like to display them in the house but...

what are thoughts as far as an investment?

thanks for any insight.

39
Link Posted: 7/16/2010 2:14:43 PM EDT
They sure look cool.

danny
Link Posted: 7/16/2010 2:18:16 PM EDT
Buy gold instead
Link Posted: 7/16/2010 2:18:34 PM EDT
As an investment they're not worth anything more than their face value.

I think displaying your money on the walls of your house would be kind of tacky.
Link Posted: 7/16/2010 2:35:03 PM EDT
Originally Posted By phurba:
As an investment they're not worth anything more than their face value.

I think displaying your money on the walls of your house would be kind of tacky.


This is my opinion, but to each his own

Link Posted: 7/16/2010 3:22:24 PM EDT
Historical money is very interesting to me.  The $500 & $1000 notes haven't been in circulation for quite a while and to the federal govt, it's only worth it's face value.  Of course, there's a collector value which from what I've seen, can range from $1,500 to $4,500 depending on the condition and year of the note.  If I wanted to invest in something, it wouldn't be money.

But if I wanted to buy some cool stuff, I'd look at older, smaller denominations.  Particularly around the turn of the century, there were some very, very interesting currency designs.

Bank notes, Confederate notes, US Notes, Gold and Silver certificates.

For example, here's a 1896 "Educational" Silver Certificate
Link Posted: 7/16/2010 8:29:34 PM EDT
I've considered it before, but......
anywayz, me thinks that it would be a novelty, don't really know how "legal" this currency would be.
not sure, but even a bank may give you a hard rub?
definitely don't see them everyday, nor Double Eagles

as posted above, I prefer older currency, gold certificates, and I also have several WWIIs w/ HAWAII and AFRICA in XF - AU.
I also have a few error notes in UNC.  when I was 16ish, I found a Five with the serial numbers going into Lincoln's head.
Link Posted: 7/17/2010 2:09:30 AM EDT
I really didn't think there would be much toward the investment side but was just thinking for the office as a conversation piece. I didn't think of the silver or gold certificates, definately a cheaper way to go.

39
Link Posted: 7/17/2010 8:24:13 PM EDT
What's your address there in PA?  Maybe I could stop by  Times be tough
Link Posted: 7/17/2010 8:36:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/17/2010 8:36:32 PM EDT by AssaultRifler]
I bought some crisp uncirculated $1 silver certificates, I think they're cool.  Whenever I get brand new $1 bills with sequential serial numbers, usually 4 or less as in change from the grocery store, I squirrel those away.  I love the smell of new money.

 
Link Posted: 7/17/2010 9:52:09 PM EDT
Pure money is a loosing investment.

It doesn't even keep up with inflation, and there is the risk of theft.

If you want some money for your wall, the US mint sells uncut sheets of bills, either 16 or 32 would look sweet.  My preference would be the 2.00 bill, since its rare, and 32 of them would only be 64.00 (face value, then mint marks up the uncut sheets a bit, kind of ironic, since you are saving them the hassle of cutting them, and they will probably never enter circulation, so its pure profit).

As an investment, its a terrible choice, but as a piece of art, its pretty sweet.
Link Posted: 7/17/2010 10:03:38 PM EDT
Originally Posted By tel0004:
Pure money is a loosing investment.

It doesn't even keep up with inflation, and there is the risk of theft.

If you want some money for your wall, the US mint sells uncut sheets of bills, either 16 or 32 would look sweet.  My preference would be the 2.00 bill, since its rare, and 32 of them would only be 64.00 (face value, then mint marks up the uncut sheets a bit, kind of ironic, since you are saving them the hassle of cutting them, and they will probably never enter circulation, so its pure profit).

As an investment, its a terrible choice, but as a piece of art, its pretty sweet.


Think of all those stamps that never get posted.
Link Posted: 7/18/2010 8:04:32 PM EDT
I have a freind who made a display with the smallest coin denominations from all over the world. It's pretty neat, and I think he spent around $15 on it.
Link Posted: 7/18/2010 9:08:38 PM EDT
I've never thought buying collectibles could be considered "investing".
Link Posted: 7/19/2010 9:45:12 AM EDT
Originally Posted By CyberSEAL:
I've never thought buying collectibles could be considered "investing".

buying machineguns can be considered investing :)
Link Posted: 7/20/2010 6:56:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/20/2010 6:57:16 AM EDT by CyberSEAL]
What I meant is, I would only buy collectibles if I had an interest in them, not to try and make a profit. There are far better avenues for generating a return on income than machines guns and baseball cards.
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