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Posted: 10/5/2005 11:10:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/5/2005 11:13:15 AM EDT by Mantis_51]


National Park Service(NPS) shows the carcass of an alligator as it protudes out to the right from the curved body of a dead Burmese python in Everglades National Park, Florida.(AFP/NPS-HO/Michael Barron)

Found the pic on Yahoo News under the Odd News Photos
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:12:29 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:13:05 AM EDT


I can't even make out where the alligator ends and the python begins.

Python vs Gator would have been one kickass video to see, I'll bet.

Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:14:57 AM EDT
freaky, something higher up on the foodchain?
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:15:30 AM EDT
Looks like the gator's tail thrashing around inside the snake ripped it open.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:15:38 AM EDT
That was just on the news. Bit off more then he could chew. The people interviewed we concerned that the gators were no longer alone at the top of the food chain.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:16:41 AM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:17:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ARDOC:
That was just on the news. Bit off more then he could chew. The people interviewed we concerned that the gators were no longer alone at the top of the food chain.



As far as I'm concerned. WE are at the top of the food chain

Vegetarians are pussies.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:17:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AvengeR15:

I can't even make out where the alligator ends and the python begins.

Python vs Gator would have been one kickass video to see, I'll bet.




The gator begins and ends in the middle of the python.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:19:48 AM EDT
<---makes mental note NOT to vacation in the everglades.....
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:19:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By thompsondd:

Originally Posted By AvengeR15:

I can't even make out where the alligator ends and the python begins.

Python vs Gator would have been one kickass video to see, I'll bet.




The gator begins and ends in the middle of the python.



Thank you, 1LT Obvious. Outstanding observation. Consider yourself promoted!

Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:29:59 AM EDT
What I want to know is where the Burm came from?
It's not exactly as if they are native to the Everglades?
Also, that looks abnormally large for a Burm. It's true that Burms can reach up to 20 ft., but that is EXTREMELY rare. Most never exceed 12ft.

It is not feasible that the gator thrashed from the inside. Burms are constrictors and will thoroughly constrict and kill any prey before it starts swallowing.

Why was a snake native to far east Asia floating around in the everglades looking for gators? It's not a typical item on it's menu.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:33:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Brohawk:
Looks like the gator's tail thrashing around inside the snake ripped it open.

That would be hard to believe. More likely, Burmese did the grab-wrap-suffocate, the ate it head first. It just swallowed more than it could digest, literally.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:34:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tifosi:
What I want to know is where the Burm came from?
It's not exactly as if they are native to the Everglades?
Also, that looks abnormally large for a Burm. It's true that Burms can reach up to 20 ft., but that is EXTREMELY rare. Most never exceed 12ft.

It is not feasible that the gator thrashed from the inside. Burms are constrictors and will thoroughly constrict and kill any prey before it starts swallowing.

Why was a snake native to far east Asia floating around in the everglades looking for gators? It's not a typical item on it's menu.



I assumed that it was an escaped pet.

As for the gator not being dead, I assume that even a dead gator could severely stress the innards of a snake.


That's a nasty case of indigestion, for sure.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:35:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tifosi:
What I want to know is where the Burm came from?
It's not exactly as if they are native to the Everglades?
Also, that looks abnormally large for a Burm. It's true that Burms can reach up to 20 ft., but that is EXTREMELY rare. Most never exceed 12ft.

It is not feasible that the gator thrashed from the inside. Burms are constrictors and will thoroughly constrict and kill any prey before it starts swallowing.

Why was a snake native to far east Asia floating around in the everglades looking for gators? It's not a typical item on it's menu.



I was wondering the same thing
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:36:02 AM EDT
Looks like he had a little trouble pooping that one out.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:36:17 AM EDT
Could just be the way the photo looks. It could just be a 3 foot long croc and a 12 foot log snake in a some short grass.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:36:30 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:37:08 AM EDT
Whoa, we need a snake like that to catch Reggie.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:38:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:
Could just be the way the photo looks. It could just be a 3 foot long croc and a 12 foot log snake in a some short grass.

You my friend have won the golden peanut. Read the article. The snake was only 12 and a half feet long.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:40:27 AM EDT
And we're trying to save the Everglades, why????

Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:41:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:
Could just be the way the photo looks. It could just be a 3 foot long croc and a 12 foot log snake in a some short grass.

You my friend have won the golden peanut. Read the article. The snake was only 12 and a half feet long.



Peanut my ass!
Why the hell is there a 12 foot long python swimmin around in FLorida?!
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:41:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/5/2005 12:16:23 PM EDT by PBIR]

Originally Posted By tifosi:
What I want to know is where the Burm came from?
It's not exactly as if they are native to the Everglades?
Also, that looks abnormally large for a Burm. It's true that Burms can reach up to 20 ft., but that is EXTREMELY rare. Most never exceed 12ft.

It is not feasible that the gator thrashed from the inside. Burms are constrictors and will thoroughly constrict and kill any prey before it starts swallowing.

Why was a snake native to far east Asia floating around in the everglades looking for gators? It's not a typical item on it's menu.



Pet that was released when it got too big for the owner's taste would be my guess. Very possible a ranger killed it and slit it open. See article below.

ETA: http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/southflorida/news/pythonsgonewild2004.html




Pythons Gone Wild: Freed Pet Snakes Thrive In Everglades

May 23, 2004
Release from:
South Florida Sun-Sentinel

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - As Mike Mercier walked along a boardwalk at Everglades National Park, he heard a series of loud splashes.

His wife shouted for him to look, and he saw a stunning sight: A huge snake wrapped around an adult alligator. The alligator rolled over and grabbed the snake in its mouth. As Mercier ran down the boardwalk to keep up, the alligator swam off with the snake in its jaws.

His photographs confirmed what he thought he saw: a Burmese python, a native of Southeast Asia and one of the largest snakes in the world.

Since the mid-1990s, rangers and other employees have captured or killed 67 Burmese pythons at Everglades National Park, and sightings are becoming more frequent. Illegally released by pet owners who no longer wanted to take care of them, the snakes have begun to breed along the main park road, causing deep concern among biologists who want to protect the park's wildlife.

"They're eating native birds and mammals," said Skip Snow, a park biologist in charge of reducing the python population. "They're here because of the international pet trade."



In the past five years, the United States has imported 144,563 Burmese pythons, with the largest number coming from Vietnam, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The Humane Society of the United States and other animal welfare groups have called for restrictions on the trade in pythons and other reptiles, saying it endangers people and subjects animals to cruel confinement, thirst and starvation during transport. At a minimum, they say people should have to get a license to own such a dangerous animal.

"We would like to see some type of control over what people are allowed to buy as private pets," said Richard Farinato, director of the Humane Society's captive wildlife program. "We don't think there's any reason to be breeding or dealing in constrictors that can grow big enough to eat your neighbor's kid."

As the home of alligators, panthers and rattlesnakes, Everglades National Park has no shortage of scary predators. What makes the Burmese python particularly scary is that it's a non-native species, which means its effect on the park's environment is unpredictable.

Arriving with growing frequency through international trade and travel, non-native plants and animals can disrupt ecosystems that evolved for thousands of years without them. While many of these species turn out to be harmless, some have crowded out native wildlife. Fire ants from South America, for example, have spread throughout the southeastern United States, killing small animals and out-competing native ants.

Pythons are capable of killing and eating every variety of bird and mammal in the park, with the exception of full-grown panthers, Snow said. In the digestive tracts of pythons killed at the park, biologists have found the remains of gray squirrels, cotton rats, black rats, opossum, pied-billed grebes and house wrens. And in an ominous development, pythons have been spotted with growing frequency at Paurotis Pond, site of a rookery of endangered wood storks in Everglades National Park.

Aside from directly killing wildlife, pythons compete with them for prey and for space. By consuming small mammals, they're taking food from the mouths of native predators such as bobcats, hawks and other snakes. And by occupying the park's holes and burrows, they're taking valuable space away from native snakes such as the endangered Eastern indigo snake.

While attacks on human beings are rare, pythons have killed people. An 8-year-old girl died in 2002 in suburban Pittsburgh after her family's pet python escaped from its cage and wrapped itself around her neck. Also that year, a Colorado man was killed when his 10-foot python coiled around his neck and chest. It took seven firefighters to unwrap the snake.

Pythons found at the park are killed. Rangers shoot them on the spot. Snow and other park workers capture them with a snake stick, which immobilizes the head, and bundle them into a Martha Stewart laundry bag (favored because it's sturdy and has lots of small air holes). They kill the snake by putting it into a confined container and pumping in carbon dioxide, a method of euthanasia approved by veterinarians.

"The animals are fascinating," Snow said. "It makes me quite angry we have to be in a position of capturing and destroying these animals."

Anyone who wants to keep a venomous snake such as a cobra or rattlesnake must obtain a state license, which requires a home inspection of the proposed confinement area and letters from snake experts attesting to the applicant's experience with poisonous snakes. But for constrictors such as pythons and boas, no licenses are required. Anyone can walk into a store and buy a small one for as little as $30.

"You get people who really want to have the biggest snake in the world," said Ben Siegel, owner of a reptile store in Deerfield Beach, Fla. "I think a lot of it is a macho thing. It's an impressive animal to look at - a giant snake that could eat a large deer or a pig."

Aware that many customers may not know what they're getting into, Siegel tries to steer them toward more manageable snakes such as the ball python, which grows to only six feet or so. Siegel said it would make sense to require a permit to own giant snakes, those that could grow to 12 feet or longer, so long as the requirements aren't as stringent as for venomous snakes.

Marshall Meyers, executive vice president and general counsel of the Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council, a trade group based in Washington, said the industry supports the idea of requiring a license to own a large snake. But the group opposes a ban on the trade.

"The problem with total prohibition is that you drive up interest and demand," he said. "And you can drive the trade underground."


Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:41:38 AM EDT
Isn't that actually a Kayman (SP?)? I didn't think even Anacondas' could eat full sized alligators?
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:45:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:
Could just be the way the photo looks. It could just be a 3 foot long croc and a 12 foot log snake in a some short grass.

You my friend have won the golden peanut. Read the article. The snake was only 12 and a half feet long.



Only 12ft long, why that is just a whipper snapper

Still a big snake, it is twice the size of a person. What round would be good to take that snake out, besided a croc round.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:47:41 AM EDT
I tried to tell Ted Kennedy that one more plate of seafood was going to kill him.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:49:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AvengeR15:

I can't even make out where the alligator ends and the python begins.

Python vs Gator would have been one kickass video to see, I'll bet.




Look closely...the alligator blew out through the snakes belly button.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:50:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/5/2005 11:52:03 AM EDT by Yojimbo]
Damn! I guess Pepto-Bismol wouldn't have helped...
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:51:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Daytona955i:
I tried to tell Ted Kennedy that one more plate of seafood was going to kill him.



No such luck!
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:55:48 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 12:07:54 PM EDT
Burmese pythons are not native/indigenous that was someones pet at one time. I remember seeing something on the discovery channel one time about Miami International Airport being made an international wildlife refuge due to the introduced species released by smugglers proliferating thier. In the same show they showed a Australian saltwater Crocodile that killed everything competitive in its territory and a TaiPan 4th most deadly snake in the world (Australian as well) cornered in a suburban garage.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 12:08:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By twonami:
freaky, something higher up on the foodchain?



More likely a boat propeller.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 12:14:26 PM EDT
Can someone mirror this one? I'm getting a fat red X.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 12:16:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Brohawk:
Looks like the gator's tail thrashing around inside the snake ripped it open.



I highly doubt that. Constricting snakes suffocate or break their prey's back. They don't eat prey that is still moving, especially if it is "thrashing."
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 12:48:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:

Originally Posted By SigSaurP228:
Looks like he had a little trouble pooping that one out.



Rectum??? Fuckin' killed 'em.



Link Posted: 10/5/2005 1:00:40 PM EDT
My money woulda been on the gator but with the amount of strange animals being dumped in the Everglades who knows what the outcome coulda been...I call it a draw...
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 1:54:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Specop_007: Why the hell is there a 12 foot long python swimmin around in FLorida?!
A bunch of rednecks released them into the Glades so that they will grow and be a source of meat and leather. They're like cows, but you don't have to watch over them.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 2:04:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/5/2005 2:05:22 PM EDT by Dusty_C]

Originally Posted By Mattl:

Originally Posted By twonami:
freaky, something higher up on the foodchain?



More likely a boat propeller.

You have to be a Native American or a Ranger or have some other "official" reason to be in the Glades. Airboats only, no propeller.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 2:10:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Mantis_51:
us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/afp/20051005/capt.sge.ogx76.051005183436.photo00.photo.default-378x271.jpg?x=378&y=271&sig=FK5c8Tpmw5Uf8lqtK9NSsg--

National Park Service(NPS) shows the carcass of an alligator as it protudes out to the right from the curved body of a dead Burmese python in Everglades National Park, Florida.(AFP/NPS-HO/Michael Barron)

Found the pic on Yahoo News under the Odd News Photos



Mantis_51,

Come on man, fess up. You and theFAILURE got these two guys to pose this pic, didn't ya?
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 2:16:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/5/2005 2:19:03 PM EDT by ALLANJ]

The 13-foot-snake and six-foot gator both wound up dead, locked so gruesomely it is hard to make heads, tails or any other body part of either creature.

When the carcasses were found last week in an isolated marsh in Everglades National Park, the gator's tail and hind legs protruded from the ruptured gut of a python -- which had swallowed it whole.

As an added touch of the macabre, the snake's head was missing.



http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/news/weather/environment/12820947.htm?source=rss&channel=miamiherald_environment
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 2:18:59 PM EDT
Now that snake knows how I feel after eating Taco bell
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 2:33:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/5/2005 2:36:55 PM EDT by nightowl7]

Originally Posted By arowneragain:
<---makes mental note NOT to vacation in the everglades.....

Thats one reason to carry a slug gun and a stout backup in that kind of unfamiliar territory.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 4:11:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Specop_007:

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:
Could just be the way the photo looks. It could just be a 3 foot long croc and a 12 foot log snake in a some short grass.

You my friend have won the golden peanut. Read the article. The snake was only 12 and a half feet long.



Peanut my ass!




Kinky bastard...
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 4:14:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Daytona955i:
I tried to tell Ted Kennedy that one more plate of seafood was going to kill him.







But sir, it is but a wafer-thin mint gator....




Monty Python......alligator.....wafer-thin mint.......Burmese python.....fuck off I'm full......

That just works on so many levels.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 4:16:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Mattl:

Originally Posted By twonami:
freaky, something higher up on the foodchain?



More likely a boat propeller.





Like he said.....
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 4:21:10 PM EDT
I wonder what took the snakes head off then..
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 4:24:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/5/2005 4:25:33 PM EDT by krpind]

Originally Posted By napalm:

Originally Posted By Mattl:

Originally Posted By twonami:
freaky, something higher up on the foodchain?



More likely a boat propeller.





Like he said.....



More likely the snake won the first battle with a gator and lost the second with a different gator due to the fact it was full with the first gator.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 4:26:09 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 4:44:41 PM EDT
Just imagine if that snake got a hold of you... uhhh that freaks me out.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 4:45:55 PM EDT
That's alotta boots there
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 4:49:36 PM EDT
Thanks for the article PBIR.
As someone who loves snakes and works with them daily, it is a constant struggle to educate potential buyers of large Pythons what they are getting into. Unfortunately, many of these animals are euthanized (bad) or released into a non-native environment (very bad), when they get to that size. Animal adoption agencies are constantly trying to find good homes for large constrictors. The zoos have all they can handle.

I was at a recent reptile show and watched one vendor sell an African rock Python to a kid that was no more than 15. It was a neonate so only about 2 feet. If you think a Burm is bad, African Rocks can get quite a bit bigger and have wicked temperments. (Burms are actually quite docile).

Here is an African Rock...



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