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Posted: 12/30/2003 10:36:08 AM EDT
80 tooth carbide for $75?
80 tooth steel for $15?
200 tooth steel for $15?

What do I need for a chop saw for oak?  I need/want to make nice clean cuts, but will that $80 blade do something the $15 one won't?
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 10:37:57 AM EDT
Yep.

Carbide for oak.  Don't skimp.  Freud is my pick.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 10:38:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2003 10:39:54 AM EDT by Scottman]
80 tooth carbide.

BTW< it's not that the $80 blade does something the $15 won't.  It's the other way around.  The carbide blade [b]won't[/b] get dull as fast and [b]won't[/b] burn your wood...
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 12:39:12 PM EDT
YES ^

Carbide is definitely worth the money.
Oak definitely calls for carbide.

If you have good sharpening service nearby you can get the carbide resharpened a few times, getting new blade performance for much less cash outlay.
I play mostly with oak, and it is tough even on the carbide. Plain steel start burning it's way through very quickly.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 12:41:40 PM EDT
I've used many of both.

Get carbide.  It is all I use now.  Definitely worth the extra expense.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 12:58:19 PM EDT
An 80 tooth Freud carbide blade will serve you well for a long time. The cheaper blades are disposable.

I see you post quite a few woodworking questions, here's a good site for you to check out. They have some pretty nifty free plans and an excellent forum with some pretty cool folks.

[url=http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/index.asp]Fine Woodworking[/url]
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 1:12:30 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Cougar8045:
An 80 tooth Freud carbide blade will serve you well for a long time. The cheaper blades are disposable.

I see you post quite a few woodworking questions, here's a good site for you to check out. They have some pretty nifty free plans and an excellent forum with some pretty cool folks.

[url=http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/index.asp]Fine Woodworking[/url]
View Quote


Thanks cougar.

I'm not really into boxed plans, but I'll check 'em out nonetheless.  Lately I'm just not used to dealing with oak.  New material for me.  Sounds like it might break me, haha.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 1:17:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2003 1:19:45 PM EDT by thebeekeeper1]
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 1:26:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2003 1:27:17 PM EDT by Old_Painless]
thebeekeeper1, I'm familiar with both Oldham and Freud.  They are both considered the best of the best.

I've actually had pretty good success with even cheap carbide blades from Sam's.  The carbide is too thin to resharpen, but when it gets dull, I just throw them away and buy a new one.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 1:36:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2003 1:37:30 PM EDT by rain]
Old Painless brings up a good point, some carbide blades are relatively cheap, and don't appear to be worth the price of re-sharpening.
I do however use them for rough frame lumbering, and I touch them up myself with a diamond stick sharpener. It keeps them cutting for a lot longer, and even if my hand sharpening is not precise, it's for rough cuts anyway.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 2:23:45 PM EDT
There are many decent blades out there in the $35-50 price range.

For clean cutting oak on a chop saw I would get something in the 40-60 tooth range with carbide teeth.

Freud, Oldham, Dewalt all make decent blades in that price range.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 3:00:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2003 3:09:04 PM EDT by not_by_works]
Norman, I do it for a living, even every week !!

I've been through them all. The best blade for your appl. is either the offerings by Irwin in MAR
ATHON, or P-C's newest entry - their multi-sized-tooth wonder .

both are (sorry) AWESOME !!
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 3:06:40 PM EDT
A good blade is going to cost roughly a dollar a tooth. You want to get at least a sixty tooth blade for the work you are going to do.

Around here resharpening costs fifty cents a tooth, so I just buy new ones.

Freud, Oldham, Dewalt, in descending order of preference. A few other brands offer good blades, but I would stick with the "FODs" when it comes to chopsaw blades.[;)]
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 3:12:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2003 3:23:39 PM EDT by norman74]
Now here's the second part of the question....

How's this saw/blade combo look?


[url=http://www.lowes.com/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=60006-32764-MS275]This is the saw: Delta   10" ShopMaster Compound Miter Saw[/url]

[url=http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US/diy_main/pg_diy.jsp?BV_SessionID=@@@@1131250072.1072829346@@@@&BV_EngineID=cceladckflekkljcgelceffdfgidgkk.0&CNTTYPE=PROD_META&CNTKEY=Products_2/Power%20Tools&MID=9876&pos=n24]This is the blade: DeWALT 10 In. 60-Tooth Carbide Saw Blade[/url]
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 3:29:12 PM EDT
Freud blades are among the best, and they are what I use. *Always* get carbide, for the reasons already mentioned.

This blade would be ideal for you: [url=http://www.freudtools.com/woodworkers/rep/sawblades/Industrial_Series/Crosscut/010_LU91R_A.jpg]Right Here[/url]

The 60 tooth will be perfect for all but the most precise work using the best saws and really expensive woods. Not only is this blade carbide but it is Teflon coated and has anti vibration design. Just make sure not to rush the cut. I realize you know how to use a saw, but with hardwoods you really have to let the saw get to working speed and take a steady cut with consistent speed and pressure.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 3:35:20 PM EDT
I've had good luck with cheapy carbide blades by Vermont American sold at Costco. I think I got 2 blades for about $20.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 3:36:31 PM EDT
Norman,

The Delta "Shopmaster" series are made in Taiwan and not of great quality. They will certainly do the job, especially for framing and such, but furniture building and fine woodworking will demand better. Look into the DeWalt 10" saw as it is made in America and has a better motor and is built better. Makita and Hitachi are good too, but only if made in Japan. Look into Porter Cable as well.

The DeWalt blade will work also, but look into the Freud one I posted about above as it a much better blade albeit for more money.

You always get what you pay for.  
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 4:00:10 PM EDT
Originally Posted By A_G:
Norman,

The Delta "Shopmaster" series are made in Taiwan and not of great quality. They will certainly do the job, especially for framing and such, but furniture building and fine woodworking will demand better. Look into the DeWalt 10" saw as it is made in America and has a better motor and is built better. Makita and Hitachi are good too, but only if made in Japan. Look into Porter Cable as well.

The DeWalt blade will work also, but look into the Freud one I posted about above as it a much better blade albeit for more money.

You always get what you pay for.  
View Quote

Unfortunately the Dewalts start at $200, plus another $80 for the blade.... I'm just not willing to spend $300 on this one tool.  Especially given my current living situation where it wouldn't be terribly hard for someone to steal it.  I don't have a shop or garage.  I've got a closet outside where I can store the tools, and I'm going to have to drag them out and set them up when I want to use them.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 4:15:27 PM EDT
Unfortunately, you pretty much get what you pay for when it comes to tools.

CMT and Forrest are also good brands.  Probably the best blade you can put on a table saw is Forrest's 10" x 80 teeth plywood blade, but it runs about $160.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 4:33:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2003 4:34:34 PM EDT by einnor1040]
Freud LU-85 80 tooth carbide. The only way to go. That is what I use to cut picture frame molding in my shop. Glass smooth cuts. Amazon has them for $70 shipping included. I just bought 2 a couple of weeks ago.


[url]http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0000223KU/002-7983301-2779218 [/url]
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 4:51:58 PM EDT
From my years of amateur wood working (mostly furniture and cabinets) I can say like in most things you get what you pay for. About 15 years ago at a tradeshow I came across a blade that I thought I would never spend the money on because it was what I thought at the time (and it still is to a point) expensive. [url=http://www.forrestblades.com/]Forrest[/url] sawblades Having used many of the popular saw blades I can tell you Forrest Blades out perform all others I've used hands down. I cut my different hard woods as well as soft woods with it and nothing holds an edge like it. The cuts are so smooth and exact sanding isn't needed. Give them a look at before you spend your hard earned money on something that does an ok job.

Good luck  
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 5:33:57 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 1911Shootist:
Unfortunately, you pretty much get what you pay for when it comes to tools.
View Quote


I do understand that, and if I had a good shop to setup and leave setup then I'd be all for it.  But based on what I have to deal with here right now, it just doesn't make any sense to drop $300 when $160 or so might cut it.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 7:58:38 PM EDT
Forrest.

Made my used sears crapsmen cut like an $800 compund miter saw.

Best $90 you can spend as an upgrade.

The WWII is the best table saw blade you can buy, too.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 9:05:25 PM EDT
Norman,

Given your circumstances it is understandable you don't want to spend too much.

You can get away with the Delta saw and DeWalt blade. Actually, I was at Lowes the other day and saw a Delta 10" compound miter saw for $99. It will do the job I am sure, and you can always get a better one when you are able, and use this one for more rough work.

I would advise spending a bit more on a good blade, however. The $100+ blades won't make much difference on a $100 saw, so don't spend that much. However, the Freud blade I mentioned will probably aid in cutting and make up a small amount for the not so exact $100 saw.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 9:15:24 PM EDT


  Where's the best (lowest cost) place to find these better blades in FL or online?


Link Posted: 12/30/2003 9:36:09 PM EDT
For tools, I first look at Amazon.com

They generally have the best prices, almost always free shipping, and no tax (for where I live anyway).

Give the site a hard look.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 9:46:26 PM EDT
Another place for woodworking tools: [url]www.rockler.com[/url]
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