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Posted: 8/31/2004 11:10:23 AM EST
I don't think he will go Kerry on the Repubs, but man is that a huge risk the GOP is taking....

My pucker factor is high
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 11:11:32 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 11:12:47 AM EST
[clenched buttocks relaxing] phewwww - thanks for talking me down [/clenched buttocks relaxing]
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 11:13:01 AM EST
I read his book. My guess is that the theme will be "the Democratic party has been taken over by communist nutbags and Kerry is one of them."
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 11:20:02 AM EST

Worry about real things.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 11:20:47 AM EST
Not a concern whatsoever.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 11:22:46 AM EST
Zell Miller is more conservative than many of the "RINOs" speaking at the convention.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 11:24:01 AM EST
I trust Zel Miller more than I trust McCain or Guiliani!
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 11:24:08 AM EST
Put the pipe down.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 11:25:11 AM EST

Not a chance.

In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if Zell Miller switched party affiliation during his floor speech!


Read this for more insight into why Zell Miller is more "Republican" than many Republicans:


How Senator Zell Miller (D-Georgia) found himself at a Republican convention for the first time in his life.

08/30/2004 12:00:00 AM

THE ALLIANCE between President Bush and Democratic Senator Zell Miller of Georgia began this way: After Bush was declared winner of the 2000 presidential race, but before he was inaugurated, he invited Miller to confer with him in Austin, Texas. Officially Bush was still Texas governor. But he wanted to talk to Miller about education, a national issue in which they had a mutual interest. Earlier, as Georgia governor, Miller had famously instituted Hope Scholarships that guaranteed every Georgia high school with a B average or better a free college education.

As he was leaving the governor's mansion in Austin, Miller told Bush he'd be willing to sponsor the No Child Left Behind education-reform bill. And almost in passing, Miller told Bush: "I agree with you about a lot of things. I support your tax cuts, too." Several days later, Miller heard from then-Senator Phil Gramm, a Texas Republican, who asked him co-sponsor the tax bill. Miller agreed.

And so a friendship, both political and personal, was born. It's a friendship that led to Miller's endorsement of Bush for reelection months ago and to his appearance to deliver the keynote address at the Republican national convention here. It's the first Republican convention Miller has ever attended. In fact, he's never voted for a Republican for any office at any time--until now.

Miller knew Bush slightly before the Austin meeting. They had been governors at the same time. And he'd heard good things about Bush from Lt. Governor Bob Bullock of Texas, a Democrat.
Bullock, Miller says, said Bush was "a person you could depend on."

Until the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, Miller had never thought about endorsing Bush. But he was impressed by Bush's reaction to the attacks. "He grabbed terrorism by the throat," Miller told host Chris Wallace on Fox News Sunday yesterday. This was in contrast to the "disappointment' Miller had felt over President Clinton's "holding back" after the first attack on the World Trade Center in 1993, the bombing of two American embassies in Africa in 1996, the killing of 19 American servicemen at Khobar Towers in Saudi Arabia, and the attack on USS Cole in 2000.

Then came the Senate votes to create a new Homeland Security Department in the fall of 2002. Democrats opposed the Bush proposal for a new department, though it had been initially recommended by Democratic Senator Joe Lieberman of Connecticut. "That was the straw that broke the camel's back," Miller said. He stopped attending meetings of the Senate Democratic caucus.

In 2003, Miller was visited by the top two officials of the Bush reelection campaign, Marc Racicot and Ken Mehlman. Miller knew Racicot because he had been governor of Montana when Miller was Georgia governor. Anyway, Miller said yes when asked if he would campaign for Bush. "I told them I'd do anything I could to help him get reelected," Miller said, including barnstorming with Bush. On Saturday, Miller will join Bush on the campaign trail. Miller is not seeking reelection to the Senate this fall.

There's one other factor in Miller's embrace of Bush: his growing disenchantment with the Democratic party. Miller calls himself a conservative Democrat. He says he was "smitten" in 1992 with Bill Clinton. Miller delivered the keynote address at the Democratic convention that year. He said he expected Clinton, as president, to "lead the [Democratic] party back to the center. But that's not the way he governed."

In agreeing to be the Republican keynoter, Miller says his 1992 speech would be played back "over and over." Indeed, that has already begun. He's also been confronted with his praise of Democratic nominee John Kerry. That, Miller says, occurred before he learned about Kerry's 20-year record in the Senate.

"He's weak on defense," Miller said on Fox News Sunday. "He's not in the mainstream of the country. He's way to the left." So is the Democratic party, Miller insisted. "There's no room in the Democratic party for moderates and conservatives." Asked if there was at least one issue on which he agreed these days with Democrats, Miller couldn't think of one.

One more thing. Miller says he won't remain in Washington even if Bush wins a second term and offers him a top position, even if it's a cushy ambassadorship. "You couldn't hold a gun to my head and get me to be an ambassador," he said. And he seemed to mean it.





Link Posted: 8/31/2004 11:26:21 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/31/2004 11:26:34 AM EST by Steve_T_M]
It's sad that Democrat Zell Miller is the only RNC speaker who seems to be committed to the right to keep and bear arms.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 11:26:47 AM EST
Extremely unlikely.

In fact, Zel is going to sew up whatever support HASN'T yet been guaranteed for W...
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 11:27:04 AM EST

Originally Posted By motown_steve:
I trust Zel Miller more than I trust McCain or Guiliani!



You hit the nail on the head. Media Pundits have been painting those two as the future of the Republican Party and that makes me nervous. I for one, could never support either of them for Prez.

Link Posted: 8/31/2004 11:28:30 AM EST

Originally Posted By Steve_T_M:
It's sad that Democrat Zell Miller is the only RNC speaker who seems to be committed to the right to keep and bear arms.



Nonsense. VP Cheney is speaking.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:52:34 PM EST
A good old fashoned southern democrat?
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 4:24:50 PM EST

Originally Posted By Combat_Jack:
A VERY good old fashoned southern democrat?

Link Posted: 8/31/2004 4:28:23 PM EST
I severelt doubt it.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 8:02:01 PM EST
I don't understand why great conservatives like Ronald Reagan and Phil Gramm saw fit to switch parties, but Zel Miller is vowing to retire soon as a Democrat???
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 8:05:31 PM EST
Zell Miller is retiring from the senate, I expect no one we will elect even a Repbulican will be an equal replacement.

He wont sucker punch the GOP, the Dems already are against him and hes not running again so expect him to speak his true mind.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 8:06:04 PM EST

I don't understand why great conservatives like Ronald Reagan and Phil Gramm saw fit to switch parties, but Zel Miller is vowing to retire soon as a Democrat???



Why should he have to switch? His party left him, he didn't leave them.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 8:06:33 PM EST

Originally Posted By The_Macallan:
Not a chance.

In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if Zell Miller switched party affiliation during his floor speech!


Read this for more insight into why Zell Miller is more "Republican" than many Republicans:


How Senator Zell Miller (D-Georgia) found himself at a Republican convention for the first time in his life.

08/30/2004 12:00:00 AM

THE ALLIANCE between President Bush and Democratic Senator Zell Miller of Georgia began this way: After Bush was declared winner of the 2000 presidential race, but before he was inaugurated, he invited Miller to confer with him in Austin, Texas. Officially Bush was still Texas governor. But he wanted to talk to Miller about education, a national issue in which they had a mutual interest. Earlier, as Georgia governor, Miller had famously instituted Hope Scholarships that guaranteed every Georgia high school with a B average or better a free college education.

As he was leaving the governor's mansion in Austin, Miller told Bush he'd be willing to sponsor the No Child Left Behind education-reform bill. And almost in passing, Miller told Bush: "I agree with you about a lot of things. I support your tax cuts, too." Several days later, Miller heard from then-Senator Phil Gramm, a Texas Republican, who asked him co-sponsor the tax bill. Miller agreed.

And so a friendship, both political and personal, was born. It's a friendship that led to Miller's endorsement of Bush for reelection months ago and to his appearance to deliver the keynote address at the Republican national convention here. It's the first Republican convention Miller has ever attended. In fact, he's never voted for a Republican for any office at any time--until now.

Miller knew Bush slightly before the Austin meeting. They had been governors at the same time. And he'd heard good things about Bush from Lt. Governor Bob Bullock of Texas, a Democrat.
Bullock, Miller says, said Bush was "a person you could depend on."

Until the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, Miller had never thought about endorsing Bush. But he was impressed by Bush's reaction to the attacks. "He grabbed terrorism by the throat," Miller told host Chris Wallace on Fox News Sunday yesterday. This was in contrast to the "disappointment' Miller had felt over President Clinton's "holding back" after the first attack on the World Trade Center in 1993, the bombing of two American embassies in Africa in 1996, the killing of 19 American servicemen at Khobar Towers in Saudi Arabia, and the attack on USS Cole in 2000.

Then came the Senate votes to create a new Homeland Security Department in the fall of 2002. Democrats opposed the Bush proposal for a new department, though it had been initially recommended by Democratic Senator Joe Lieberman of Connecticut. "That was the straw that broke the camel's back," Miller said. He stopped attending meetings of the Senate Democratic caucus.

In 2003, Miller was visited by the top two officials of the Bush reelection campaign, Marc Racicot and Ken Mehlman. Miller knew Racicot because he had been governor of Montana when Miller was Georgia governor. Anyway, Miller said yes when asked if he would campaign for Bush. "I told them I'd do anything I could to help him get reelected," Miller said, including barnstorming with Bush. On Saturday, Miller will join Bush on the campaign trail. Miller is not seeking reelection to the Senate this fall.

There's one other factor in Miller's embrace of Bush: his growing disenchantment with the Democratic party. Miller calls himself a conservative Democrat. He says he was "smitten" in 1992 with Bill Clinton. Miller delivered the keynote address at the Democratic convention that year. He said he expected Clinton, as president, to "lead the [Democratic] party back to the center. But that's not the way he governed."

In agreeing to be the Republican keynoter, Miller says his 1992 speech would be played back "over and over." Indeed, that has already begun. He's also been confronted with his praise of Democratic nominee John Kerry. That, Miller says, occurred before he learned about Kerry's 20-year record in the Senate.

"He's weak on defense," Miller said on Fox News Sunday. "He's not in the mainstream of the country. He's way to the left." So is the Democratic party, Miller insisted. "There's no room in the Democratic party for moderates and conservatives." Asked if there was at least one issue on which he agreed these days with Democrats, Miller couldn't think of one.

One more thing. Miller says he won't remain in Washington even if Bush wins a second term and offers him a top position, even if it's a cushy ambassadorship. "You couldn't hold a gun to my head and get me to be an ambassador," he said. And he seemed to mean it.









Miller said he would die a Democrat...and I think he's more effective as a Democrate, high-lighting how nutter his party has become. Like Ron Silver (and many other Dems have said) "I didn't leave the party, the party left me"
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 8:07:17 PM EST
The last of the Scoop Jackson Democrats.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 8:25:38 PM EST

Originally Posted By texasAR:

Originally Posted By motown_steve:
I trust Zel Miller more than I trust McCain or Guiliani!



You hit the nail on the head. Media Pundits have been painting those two as the future of the Republican Party and that makes me nervous. I for one, could never support either of them for Prez.




In another thread, I mentioned an old line about rats and a sinking ship...

Well, it may well be that it's not just the Kerry campaign that's sinking... The entire Dem party may be in serious trouble if the can't hold their position in Congress...

I have a feeling that some media pundits see this as a possibility, and are picking favorites in case the Dems marginalize themselves...

Fortunately, 'media pundits' don't pick Presidential candidates. WE - the 'core' conservative 'true believers' DO! Well, unless 'we' are too busy to VOTE IN PRIMARIES...

Link Posted: 8/31/2004 8:36:43 PM EST
Zel Miller is a class act...................More democooks should follow him
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 9:29:51 PM EST
I've liked what I've heard from him in the recent past....but was just worried about a big hanging curve ball that catches you off guard.

Let's hope for no surprises
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 11:14:08 PM EST

Originally Posted By JHP:
I've liked what I've heard from him in the recent past....but was just worried about a big hanging curve ball that catches you off guard.

Let's hope for no surprises



Put your mind at ease. He is a man of honor and he is voting for President Bush.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 2:11:15 AM EST
Zell Miller is in a position to unite this country far more than Kerry ever could. He is focusing on core issues that are near and dear to the hearts of most Americans, whereas Kerry's campaign is divisive in nature.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:34:26 AM EST
roger that
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:35:15 AM EST
NO
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:28:37 PM EST
He spanked the Dem party yes he did!
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:32:46 PM EST
Uhhhhhhhhhhhhhh...no.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:34:39 PM EST
I would say he crotch kicked them.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:37:11 PM EST
Just watched him and he did a GREAT job! A true patriot and a GREAT American!
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:37:36 PM EST

Originally Posted By JHP:
I don't think he will go Kerry on the Repubs, but man is that a huge risk the GOP is taking....

My pucker factor is high



you don't watch fox news much do you?
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:43:00 PM EST
He is a damn good speaker! Somebody run over to Du and find out if they are planning to assassinate him
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:43:07 PM EST
He certainly didn't sucker-punch the GOP, but he BITCH-SLAPPED the DNC!
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:46:14 PM EST

Originally Posted By Zaphod:
He certainly didn't sucker-punch the GOP, but he BITCH-SLAPPED the DNC!



He just castrated and a$$ raped the DNC and left them sucking their thumbs and crying in the corner.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:51:21 PM EST

Originally Posted By VaniB:
I don't understand why great conservatives like Ronald Reagan and Phil Gramm saw fit to switch parties, but Zel Miller is vowing to retire soon as a Democrat???



From "A National Party No More:"


I was born a Democrat. It's not simply a party affiliation: it's more like a birthmark for me and my fellow mountaineers . . . .allegiance to the Democratic party have been handed down in my family from one generation to the next. Time does not erase it. It is part of our DNA.

I would no more think of changing parties than I would think of changing my name. To change would be like walking on my mother's grave.



Miller goes on to explain that his mom was an elected official in their tiny Georgia town. Also he was raised (as was I) in a place and time where to be anything but a Democrat was to disenfranchised. There were almost no general elections, and the ones they had were a joke.

I haven't changed parties, either, so I sort of understand where he's coming from. Once in awhile, the Democrats will do something that makes me decide to drive to the Supervisor's Office at 8 AM and switch, but it passes. As some say around here, "My daddy was a Democrat, my granddaddy was a Democrat, and the bastards who occupied this town in 1865 were Republicans." It's dumb as hell, but there you are. I hate the Democratic party and almost everything it stands for, but there's still a "D" on my voter registration card.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:54:26 PM EST

Originally Posted By FLAL1A:

Originally Posted By VaniB:
I don't understand why great conservatives like Ronald Reagan and Phil Gramm saw fit to switch parties, but Zel Miller is vowing to retire soon as a Democrat???



From "A National Party No More:"


I was born a Democrat. It's not simply a party affiliation: it's more like a birthmark for me and my fellow mountaineers . . . .allegiance to the Democratic party have been handed down in my family from one generation to the next. Time does not erase it. It is part of our DNA.

I would no more think of changing parties than I would think of changing my name. To change would be like walking on my mother's grave.



Miller goes on to explain that his mom was an elected official in their tiny Georgia town. Also he was raised (as was I) in a place and time where to be anything but a Democrat was to disenfranchised. There were almost no general elections, and the ones they had were a joke.

I haven't changed parties, either, so I sort of understand where he's coming from. Once in awhile, the Democrats will do something that makes me decide to drive to the Supervisor's Office at 8 AM and switch, but it passes. As some say around here, "My daddy was a Democrat, my granddaddy was a Democrat, and the bastards who occupied this town in 1865 were Republicans." It's dumb as hell, but there you are. I hate the Democratic party and almost everything it stands for, but there's still a "D" on my voter registration card.




...but you vote Republican in national elections, riiiight? Please tell me that you vote Republican for US congress and for Governor.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:56:54 PM EST

Originally Posted By kindstranger:

...but you vote Republican in national elections, riiiight? Please tell me that you vote Republican for US congress and for Governor.



Newt Gingrich may be slightly more reliable as a Republican voter than I am, but that's not absolutely certain.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:58:35 PM EST

Originally Posted By FLAL1A:

Originally Posted By kindstranger:

...but you vote Republican in national elections, riiiight? Please tell me that you vote Republican for US congress and for Governor.



Newt Gingrich may be slightly more reliable as a Republican voter than I am, but that's not absolutely certain.



(sigh)
We actually think alot alike except that I am a Republican.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 6:01:59 PM EST
I'd say you can put that fear to rest. We'll get to see the Dems tending to that new Asshole Zell just ripped them tomorrow!

SG
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 6:14:56 PM EST
i was worried about it...

but, damn, he kicked ASS!
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 6:22:52 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 7:00:59 PM EST
what a great pitch by Zel....he has my undying respect
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