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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 10/4/2005 11:58:12 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 12:01:23 PM EDT
I tell my wife that ALL the time
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 12:03:50 PM EDT
that will definatly get you killed here. Know a few people that have been hit doing it, no one that died. Sad day.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 12:39:44 PM EDT
how fast was the other driver going? Must have been a fairly impressive rate of speed
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 12:45:58 PM EDT
Sorry to hear TBK.

I probably won't be surprised to hear the toxicology results on the driver. Sat night, 4am.

Link Posted: 10/4/2005 12:52:53 PM EDT
Sorry to hear that. For those that have seen the pictures of my accident, that is EXACTLY what happened to me. People don't pay attention to red lights for anything.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 1:41:36 PM EDT
I'm very sorry to hear this. Unfortunately this is all too common and it's not just w/ LEO's. Sometimes that light is blatantly green for you and blatantly red for cross traffic, and you still see someone crash the light. I wish your department the best during this time, and most of all her family/people she's left behind. In some ways the driver at fault's death seems right w/ this situation, and in other ways I'd almost rather see them in jail. I'm not sure which would be the fitting punishment.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 2:22:27 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 2:36:57 PM EDT
sorry to hear TBK.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 5:18:34 PM EDT
Since I have moved to Texas, I scan more often and frequently sitting at lights and approaching intersections.


As others have mentioned people do not pay attention, are very inconsiderate
and just plan STUPID !!
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 5:23:28 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 5:23:38 PM EDT
Mike, any word yet on funeral plans? If I'm off, I'll see if I can get approval to go.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 6:05:39 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 7:49:36 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 9:09:19 PM EDT
I'm so sorry to hear this.

Just a random thing, but when I was a kid we lived in Mt. Zion just outside Decatur and I remember my mother getting to an accident at the intersection of Pershing / Water. Its practically the same intersection. The same thing happened to her too. The light turned green, she started to go...then blam. Some guy blew the light on her. I just remember it so well because it was the first time in my life something bad happened to a family member. Fortunately, she recovered.

Seems like I remember this intersection always being dangerous.

Anyway, my story is trivial compared to your loss. My condolences to you and your department.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 5:12:59 AM EDT
This morning's article:

Police officer's death sparks deep mourning
By RON INGRAM - H&R Staff Writer
- Published online on Wednesday, October 5, 2005 12:47 AM CDT

DECATUR - Robin Vogel's family said she lived for her job as a police officer, Decatur Police Chief Mark Barthelemy told a hushed news conference called Tuesday to discuss the 37-year-old's six-and-a-half year career.

At times choking back tears, Bar­;thelemy described Vogel as "energetic, upbeat and spirited." He said her enthusiastic attitude rubbed off on everyone with whom she came into contact.

The third-shift patrol officer also was a field training officer and a cultural diversity officer for the Decatur department.

Vogel died at 11:21 p.m. Monday in Carle Foundation Hospital, Urbana, from injuries suffered when her squad car was hit broadside by another vehicle at 4:03 a.m. Saturday at Pershing Road and Main Street. The driver of that vehicle, Joshua Meixner, 24, of Cerro Gordo was pronounced dead at the scene.

Barthelemy said Vogel "decided long ago to donate organs if anything ever happened to her. Her wishes were honored. I don't know which organs were suitable."

Vogel was divorced. She leaves a 15-year-old son. She had been residing in Decatur after living for many years in Springfield, the chief said.

An escort of 10 Decatur squad cars filled with fellow officers returned Vogel's body to Decatur early Tuesday as Macon County sheriff's deputies took over patrol duties in the community to free officers for the tribute.

Vogel's accident created an outpouring of compassion among area police officers, Barthelemy said. While she was hospitalized, Champaign officers opened their homes to her family, brought food to the hospital and provided coins for vending machines, he said.

As the Decatur squad cars escorted her home, Champaign, Urbana and University of Illinois police officers parked their cars at intersections along the route and stood saluting as the cortege passed about 2 a.m., Barthelemy said. At intervals along Interstate 72, Illinois State Police, Champaign County sheriff's deputies and Monticello police officers added their salutes, he said.

Decatur Mayor Paul Osborne said the city staff and residents of Decatur express their condolences to Vogel's family.

"It's a shock to lose an officer in circumstances like this," Osborne said. "This is one reason we appreciate the police department and the responsibilities (the officers) have."

Deputy Police Chief David Slade said while police department members mourn Vogel, they realize there is a family in Cerro Gordo that also mourns a loss.

"We grieve with them, too," Slade said.

Vogel's death is the first of an on-duty officer since 1912 when an officer was murdered while on patrol at Short and Cerro Gordo streets near the rail yards, Barthelemy said.

"Each and every time we swear in a class of officers, we tell the recruits about the unseemly nature of the things officers see while on the job, of the ungodly dangers that they will face while working to protect and serve the residents of this community," Barthelemy said. "Yet, it is times like this, when those dangers become a reality, and we truly realize that there's no way to brace for the feelings of hurt and anger, powerlessness and sadness that come with the loss of an officer."

Barthelemy declined to discuss whether Vogel was wearing her seat belt at the time of the accident, saying he wanted to wait for the results of the Illinois State Police investigation into the crash. He said the department's policy is for all officers to wear seat belts as required by state law.

Initial state police reports indicated Vogel was not wearing a seat belt.

Meixner's car was southbound at a high rate of speed on Main Street when it ran the red light at Pershing Road and struck Vogel's westbound squad car in the passenger side as she pulled into the intersection, state police said.

Debris from the crash was spread over more than a block-long area, Barthelemy said. After impact, the two vehicles traveled from the north side of the intersection south and came to rest in front of Tater's Restaurant, he said.

The Decatur Police Department is conducting a parallel investigation because it does not know when the state police will complete the independent review, which can sometimes be delayed because of other pressing needs, Barthelemy said. Interviewing witnesses again may cause someone to remember or mention something that was forgotten when state troopers did their interviews, he said.



Link Posted: 10/5/2005 5:37:41 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 5:41:21 AM EDT




Link Posted: 10/5/2005 8:02:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:

Originally Posted By clubsoda22:
how fast was the other driver going? Must have been a fairly impressive rate of speed



Um, I deliberately withheld comment on that. Word is his car came in from the passenger side and reached her--so he had to have been going very fast. Dunno what will play out, but one innocent is now dead, so this really stinks.



That's what the description sounded like. We're talking a lexus vs a crown vic. Neither are tin cans. Takes a lot of force to get from the passenger door to the drivers seat. I'm assuming everyone was wearing their seatbelts.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 8:08:46 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 10:07:55 AM EDT
I won't be able to make it down there, Mike. I work a 12 hour shift tonight and don't get off until 530 am. It'd be too far and too long to safely drive to risk falling asleep behind the wheel of a squad on the interstate. I'll say a prayer, though.

My guess is the other driver was probably intoxicated. However I've heard of crashes where a driver's had a heart attack and is now in a car w/ foot on the gas pedal, turning it into an unguided missle. Usually when that happens, though, the car veers off the shoulder. Coroner probably won't release autopsy results until the inquest, which might be a while
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:42:53 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:45:40 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 12:04:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:

Originally Posted By clubsoda22:

Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:

Originally Posted By clubsoda22:
how fast was the other driver going? Must have been a fairly impressive rate of speed



Um, I deliberately withheld comment on that. Word is his car came in from the passenger side and reached her--so he had to have been going very fast. Dunno what will play out, but one innocent is now dead, so this really stinks.



That's what the description sounded like. We're talking a lexus vs a crown vic. Neither are tin cans. Takes a lot of force to get from the passenger door to the drivers seat. I'm assuming everyone was wearing their seatbelts.



They recently went to Chevy Impalas--MUCH smaller/lighter and less sturdy overall. Now that it's been published, word is he was travelling VERY fast. It sounds as though her squad was pushed at least a half a block. Seat belts would not have helped her--and frankly I don't care about him (based upon the facts available to me)--and view individuals who do this kind of thing simply as a good riddance that hopefully didn't have the chance to breed.



Amen to that.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 12:32:01 PM EDT
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