Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 6/5/2008 1:13:54 PM EST
Gentlemen,

It's come down to me to spend a little of my employer's money. Specifically, I'm tasked with putting together supplies to help us get ready to for a disaster - earthquake, pandemic flu, locusts, what have you.

I feel like I have a pretty good handle on food and water, first aid, and sanitation. But I'd also like to get a fairly basic set of tools for the office. I figure if something damages the building, we might need to either break through something, or shore something up.

So, what do y'all think? What should I include, and what should I leave out? My requirements are that it be non-electric, and relatively inexpensive.

Further details - we're on the second floor of a 20+ floor building in downtown Seattle. The office has 50-55 people. Almost all of them are paper pushers, not tool users.

What sayest the hive?
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 1:17:16 PM EST
I say the real threat is Zombies. I would buy weapons and ammo. Due to the nature of things "walking off" at work, and the fact that you have been trusted to handle this, I believe they should be in your custody at all times and regularly operated to ensure thier state of readiness.

Now go out and buy a nice gun safe for your family room. You'll want to take care of all the toys in your care that the workplace has trusted you with.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 1:18:59 PM EST
Crow Bar! 36", 48" and some smaller 'cats foot' tools.

Hammer, nails, spikes.

Chem lights: you will almost certainly be working in the dark.

Dust masks. Face masks. And LOTS of 'artificial tears,' to get the dust out of your eyes.

Safety helmets.

Work gloves.

1 or 2 REEELY BIG hammers.

Link Posted: 6/5/2008 1:19:22 PM EST
Prybar, hammer, and some rope. Since your only on the second floor. Make sure there is plenty of rope to reach the ground
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 1:19:47 PM EST
Running shoes. You should always be wearing them.

When it starts to shake, get the fuck out.

Don't screw around grabbing the water and food.

Just get the fuck out before the building comes down.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 1:21:28 PM EST
Cash
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 1:21:53 PM EST
Duct tape for windows? Bracing something is not work for amateurs; if something needs it, you'd probably be better off just getting out and waiting for someone who knows how rather than trying to do it with a bunch of office workers.

Maybe a couple of those escape ladders than can be hooked to window-ledges and used to climb down if there was a blockage of the stairway.

If you need to break through something, there's a tool called the FUBAR that will most likely do the job. But, again, it's probably best just to GTFO with your coworkers.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 1:22:15 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/5/2008 1:24:08 PM EST by California_Kid]
The most urgent matter is being able to shut off gas, electricity, water, and/or power in case the immediate effects of the quake have caused a dangerous situation. Make sure you have access to the shutoffs, and any tools that are required. It's possible to have a quake trigger a landslide, flood, electrical hazard, and fire all at the same time.

Other things that come immediately to mind are a flashlight and a cow bar or three. A big ass hammer. Knife. Maybe things like pliers, screwdriver, socket set.

Tagged for interest.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 1:38:50 PM EST

Originally Posted By California_Kid:
The most urgent matter is being able to shut off gas, electricity, water, and/or power in case the immediate effects of the quake have caused a dangerous situation. Make sure you have access to the shutoffs, and any tools that are required. It's possible to have a quake trigger a landslide, flood, electrical hazard, and fire all at the same time.

Other things that come immediately to mind are a flashlight and a cow bar or three. A big ass hammer. Knife. Maybe things like pliers, screwdriver, socket set.

Tagged for interest.


Leave to a Californian He said what I said you need light and you need tools to shut off stuff if necessary. Box of chemlights too.

A roster of all employees for each department head to check off their people and report that up to you. And maybe a few radios so folks can listen to the news which may reduce or increase panic but info usually reduces panic.

Get a special set up and assign special chores to the hot women of the company so that they have to report in to you and then you can sequester them in your special areas. Duct tape may be necessary.

Probably wouldn't hurt to have some flexicuffs head wounds can cause folks to flip out so can stress. both are by products of earthquakes.

If you guys are a very rich company get yourself:

Your own fire engine
Machine guns to keep the peace
plastic sheeting
crisco
Enough MREs for you to trade for favors
lots of bullets for machine guns


If you are a poor company
7-11 has some of those 4 dollar flashlights that don't work.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 2:57:48 PM EST

Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Crow Bar! 36", 48" and some smaller 'cats foot' tools.

Hammer, nails, spikes.

Chem lights: you will almost certainly be working in the dark.

Dust masks. Face masks. And LOTS of 'artificial tears,' to get the dust out of your eyes.

Safety helmets.

Work gloves.

1 or 2 REEELY BIG hammers.



knee pads and elbow pads, goggles

I took an EQ centered Urban SAR course for work and you can expect to spend a lot of time crawling around in debris If you knew the proper markings sharpies/chalk for marking rooms you've cleared.

first aid kit with emphasis on stopping bleeding and immobilizing skeletal injuries for evacuation by less than expert helpers.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 2:59:04 PM EST
Underfolding stock AK-47.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 3:02:58 PM EST

Originally Posted By Aloxite:
Running shoes. You should always be wearing them.

When it starts to shake, get the fuck out.

Don't screw around grabbing the water and food.

Just get the fuck out before the building comes down.


WRONG WRONG WRONG - Unless the building is a total disaster, and IIRC most in the PNW have at least some EQ resistance built in, all running outside will do is let you be in the way of falling debris or scared drivers. Wait for things to calm down and then evacuate orderly. Being in the streets in a major shtf is going to be an exercise in futility. Unless the building is actually in real danger of collapse, you're better off staying in the shelter with supplies. You sure as shit aren't going to be able to drive home with the other hundreds of thousands trying to drive with no traffic lights debris in the streets.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 3:05:40 PM EST
After an earthquake, the first 3 things to worry about are

Natural gas leaks

Electrical faults

Structural failure (especially GLASS).

So: Be ready to turn off the gas;

Be ready to shut off the electricity;

Be ready to wade through glass & other debris.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 3:07:43 PM EST
I'd have some kind of pipe wrench in that kit. A cold chisel might come in handy too.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 3:30:54 PM EST
The Earthquake Survival Test

Don't know about the kit, but I would want a long-lasting flashlight in my pocket, and a noise-maker, like whistle or airhorn. If I'm alive under rubble, I don't want to rely on dogs sniffing for me; I want to let people know I'm there, either by flashing a light or making a lot of noise.

For a kit, I would think a rock-climber helmet could come in handy.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 4:09:15 PM EST
A Shovel may be handy
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 4:28:27 PM EST

Originally Posted By AiServo:
A Shovel may be handy


Glock Entrenching Tool
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 4:34:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/5/2008 4:36:36 PM EST by beagler76]
Maybe a Halligan tool........ and IIRC, they make a rescue tool that has a fitting for shutting off gas services.

Let me see if I can find it.


ETA: Here is a website with some similar ideas.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 4:40:31 PM EST

Link Posted: 6/5/2008 5:44:47 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/5/2008 5:52:47 PM EST by Skibane]
Since the company is footing the bill, I'd order a big box of Photon Micro-Lights (available in bulk quantities from the manufacturer here), and give one to every employee to put on his/her keyring. Even if the office area is full of windows, the hallways, stairways, restrooms, underground parking, closets, utility rooms, etc. could be mighty dark after the power goes out - and it'll be dark just about everywhere if the emergency occurs much after sunset.



I'd also look into buying a few cell phone battery chargers - the kind that operate off a couple of AA cells - along with a good-sized package of Energizer Lithium AA cells. (Another alternative is to buy a spare cell phone battery, but each employee will have to do that for him/self, due to the variety of battery types). Keep it in your desk - Once charged, it'll hold a charge for a long time.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 5:54:44 PM EST
Condoms.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 6:06:01 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/5/2008 6:10:17 PM EST by Paul]
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 6:44:08 PM EST

Originally Posted By Dumpster_Baby:
img2.tradeget.com/megall/2Y2AYE951toilet_paper_roll.jpg


+ eleventy billion
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 8:23:14 PM EST

Originally Posted By California_Kid:

Originally Posted By Dumpster_Baby:
img2.tradeget.com/megall/2Y2AYE951toilet_paper_roll.jpg


+ eleventy billion


Yep - Dumpster Baby for the win.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 8:32:48 PM EST
On a practical note, have a whole bunch of flashlights. My office has lost power 3 times in the past two weeks. Finding your way to the washroom is a lot easier with a flashlight.

Link Posted: 6/6/2008 1:06:10 AM EST

Originally Posted By strat81:

Originally Posted By AiServo:
A Shovel may be handy

www.glock.com/images/outdoor_spade.jpg
Glock Entrenching Tool


Exploding shovel?
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 10:37:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/6/2008 10:38:19 AM EST by DirtyBird]
This is great stuff. Thanks to all for the serious, and um, the other. Paul, thanks a lot for everything - those are some really good leads.

As always, y'all rock.

ETA: Page 2!
Top Top