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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/9/2005 6:52:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/9/2005 8:36:55 PM EDT by Win_88]
I'm about to add a Poll this one...


So what do you think really happen to the Russian sub.

The whole story is not complete. What was the sub really doing there? Was it really on military manouvers as the Russian government reported, or were they trying to rescue another sub when they got caught in the fishing net?

The Russian are still acting like Soviets. I think the truth is more embarassing than we know..





Whistleblower broke secret of Russian sub and 'saved men's lives' Tue Aug 9, 7:08 AM ET



Without an anonymous phone call by a tearful woman to a local radio station, the world may have heard too late about the Russian submarine stranded in the Pacific to save its seven crew, the journalist who took the call claimed.

Guzel Latypova, a journalist in the port city of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, says the mysterious caller shattered an official silence and in doing so pressured the authorities to look abroad for help in mounting the rescue.

The telephone rang at Radio 3, where Latypova is news director, about 24 hours after the AS-28 mini-sub became trapped 190 meters (625 feet) under the Pacific.

"A woman called in tears. She was saying that a mini-sub had got stuck with seven men aboard in the Bay of Berezovaya," Latypova, 32, recounted to AFP. The mystery caller said she had got the news from "someone" in the military.

"She saved these lads. A monument should be raised to her. If she had not called it would have remained a secret, I'm sure."

Latypova, who also works for the Kamchatka Peninsula region's STS television and the Russian news agency Interfax, was not sure at first what to make of the sensational tip-off.

"That day there was hardly any news. I called my colleague at Ria Novosti news agency, Oksana Guseva, and we tried to verify the report through our own sources."

Guseva managed to get through to Rear Admiral Viktor Gavrikov, commander in chief of the armed forces for the northeast of Russia. "Immediately his voice changed. He said 'no comment' and put the phone down. That convinced us it was serious," Latypova said.

Five minutes later, she had broadcast over the radio, and soon afterward the report was spreading across Russia through news agencies and television stations.

It was only thanks to the media that the wife of the submarine's commander, 25-year-old Vyacheslav Miloshevsky, then discovered the news.

"She heard on the local television at 7:00 p.m. No one gave her any official warning," Latypova said.

When the worried family tried to find out from the navy what the chances were of seeing their loved one again, a military psychologist arrived. "This is Russia -- pray!" he told Miloshevsky's wife Yelena, according to Latypova, who went to offer the family support.

"That's the sort of psychological help they got."

Only a few hours later did the Russian military in the capital Moscow and Pacific coast city Vladivostok confirm the report.

But in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, the military port at the centre of the desperate, three-day rescue operation, local military authorities did not say a word about the drama until Tuesday -- two days after the incident was over.

Media pressure may have played a role in President Vladimir Putin's decision to dispatch Defence Minister Sergei Ivanov to the scene, and -- crucially -- in the military's painful acknowledgement of the need for foreign help.

As soon as a high-tech British naval robot cut the cables and nets trapping the submarine, the seven men inside were saved.

This was not the first scoop for Latypova's Radio 3, which has bucked the Russian trend of extreme loyalty to the authorities and caution about running any embarrassing news.

"This is not a region here, but the edge of Russia, and that changes everything. It's the peninsula of freedom," Latypova quipped. "Don't forget that the inhabitants here are the descendants of adventurers."


Link Posted: 8/9/2005 6:58:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/9/2005 6:58:57 PM EDT by 1Gunner]
nevermind...
Link Posted: 8/9/2005 7:00:20 PM EDT
Tinfoil time.

Link Posted: 8/9/2005 7:15:57 PM EDT
They bumped into that big gold colored underwater sphere that was in that Sharon Stone movie?

I can't remember the name.

Link Posted: 8/9/2005 7:18:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By IBU-14_Gunner:
They bumped into that big gold colored underwater sphere that was in that Sharon Stone movie?

I can't remember the name.



Sphere
based on the Michael Crichton book
Link Posted: 8/9/2005 7:24:03 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/9/2005 7:50:26 PM EDT
Strange bar graph on the poll. The bar for the last question at 7% is larger than the 23%..


Well I figured I would bring up this strange theory since it never really made sense when it was first announced last week. Now the story about the whistle blower adds more questions to what was really going on.
The Russians dont like embarassments. Their afraid to ask for help when they need it. They don't like to look 2nd rate.
Unlike NASA who wont admit the have a proble, says their going to fix it and do nothing.

Isn't it funny how NASA picked California for a landing site.. You know... You dont have to worry about debris falling in the ocean if something happens. Its not like its in your backyard if something happens.

There I go again.. Where is that tin foil...
Link Posted: 8/9/2005 8:16:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/9/2005 8:24:51 PM EDT by Win_88]
Found this one.....

LINK





Investigation of Russian AS-28 mini-sub accident likely to lead to another mystery

- 08/08/2005 10:55

The area, in which the vessel sank, is known for a mysterious naval base, at which a large number of strategic nuclear submarines are stationed

The Russian AS-28 mini-sub, which suffered an accident miles off the Kamachatka Peninsula coast on Thursday, was retrieved from the bottom of the Pacific floor early at 7:25 a.m. on Sunday. Seven members of the crew opened up the hatch of the mini-sub without assistance and walked aboard a rescue vessel. The seven seamen were luckily saved from almost three days of underwater captivity.

When the Kursk submarine sank in the Barents Sea five years ago, the commander of the Russian Northern Navy, Vyacheslav Popov, was dismissed from his position. When the K-159 submarine sank three years ago, Russian authorities removed another commander, Admiral Gennady Suchkov. It seems that there is no political sense in looking for those guilty of the accident with the AS-28 minisub.

The Alagez rescue boat took the seven sailors of the rescued submarine to the central hospital of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. Admiral Vladimir Pepelayev said that serious medical aid was not required for the sailors. The seamen experienced the life-threatening accident courageously: they did not panic, neither did they try to take any actions independently. The command of the Russian Navy did not try to conceal the news about the state of the mini-sub from the press either.

To all appearance, law-enforcement authorities will have to lay responsibility on those, who plan sea operations ashore. The Russian mini-sub AS-28 was trapped in Beryozovaya Bay at the depth of over 190 meters in the afternoon of August 4. The vessel was blocked in cables and pieces of fishing net some 75 kilometers off the southern part of the Kamchatka Peninsula coast.

The region is known for a mysterious naval base, at which a large number of strategic nuclear submarines of the Russian Pacific Navy are stationed. NATO refers to the base as the hornet's nest. The base is equipped with a secret system to detect foreign submarines. The cable, in which the mini-sub was blocked, was a part of one of the central antennas of the underwater radar system, the former commander of the Black Sea Navy, Admiral Eduard Baltin said.

The sailing of fishing boats is either prohibited or restricted in the area, where the radar system is based. It is therefore unclear, how the drag-net or a piece of fishing net could find themselves on the spot, where the AS-28 mini-submarine suffered an accident.

Andrey Mikhailov



Secret sub base..... HMMMMMMMMMMMM....

I think they lost a new sub..

fixed the article
Link Posted: 8/9/2005 8:26:06 PM EDT
More than likely they were looking for OUR secret listening stations and got caught up in their own shit.
Link Posted: 8/9/2005 8:33:15 PM EDT






Link Posted: 8/9/2005 8:36:43 PM EDT
I had heard somewhere that the sub was servicing the Russian equivilent of our SOSUS(sp? can't remember the acronym) net.
Link Posted: 8/9/2005 8:43:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Armed_Scientist:
I had heard somewhere that the sub was servicing the Russian equivilent of our SOSUS(sp? can't remember the acronym) net.



Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS)


Link Global Security


Its a long article
Link Posted: 8/9/2005 8:54:35 PM EDT


what is that in the bottom right corner of that sub?
a mini me?
Link Posted: 8/9/2005 8:56:56 PM EDT
Did all the ruskies survive? i've been out of the loop
Link Posted: 8/10/2005 5:27:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/10/2005 5:29:14 PM EDT by Win_88]

Originally Posted By distributor_of_pain:
Did all the ruskies survive? i've been out of the loop




Yep.. All were saved.
Above article.


The Alagez rescue boat took the seven sailors of the rescued submarine to the central hospital of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky.

Link Posted: 8/10/2005 5:29:59 PM EDT
The Russians are ALWAYS hiding something.
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