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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 1/19/2015 11:34:06 AM EST
So the recent video where they ran an AR with several dozen magazines, making the barrel get hot enough to catch the plastic fore arm on fire.

While I don't foresee myself ever doing that, I was curious how much better carbon fiber would hold up to plastic. I would assume it is more heat resistant. I have the PRI Gen 3 fore arm.

Any ideas? Too lazy too google...
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 11:37:20 AM EST
87x the melting point of plastic.
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 11:39:15 AM EST
The melting point of the fiber is far above the burning point of the resin .
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 11:39:32 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/19/2015 11:40:47 AM EST by Pudwak]
Probably depends on the resin. (Not in response to the above post)
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 11:39:41 AM EST
Wait, CF doesn't melt it burns like fiberglass.
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 11:40:53 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Quicky06:
The melting point of the fiber is far above the burning point of the resin .
View Quote
This. Carbon fiber doesn't melt. The resin that hold's it together will.
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 11:40:55 AM EST
Is this becoming a conspiracy thread?
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 11:41:01 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/19/2015 11:41:53 AM EST by LightningII]
depends on the makeup of the fiber mat and the resins, I'd guess.

I've seen composite pieces meant for use in aircraft engines bays that were cured at a peak temp of 600 F.

it won't really "melt" either, like candle wax.
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 11:41:11 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/19/2015 11:45:15 AM EST by WilliamGray]
It depends on the make up.
They use carbon fiber for missile nose cones and brake rotors.

Link Posted: 1/19/2015 11:41:31 AM EST
Bout tree fiddy
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 11:42:14 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/19/2015 11:42:49 AM EST by DeltaElite777]
I would think the resin used would be the limiting factor for heat. The carbon itself is gonna hold up to anything that you wouldn't melt you first. All carbon fiber stuff is not created equal.
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 11:43:59 AM EST
The fiber has no defined melting point. In fact its slightly higher form, graphite, has a temperature range appropriate for the re-entry of the space shuttle.

That said, its weak point is the resin matrix that encapsulates the fiber. Higher-end carbon composites use better epoxies but several commercial composites use cheaper alternatives like Polyester resins whichhave much lower temperature ranges and thermal resistance.
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 11:44:42 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/19/2015 11:47:38 AM EST by Gulftanker]
Carbon has no melting point. It sublimes.

A carbon fiber reinforced polymer is limited by the properties of the polymer.
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 11:46:03 AM EST
Doesn't matter. The resin will melt
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 11:53:48 AM EST


Engineer checking in, I design and sell repairs into heavy industry using composites, typically carbon fiber.

The carbon fiber itself will withstand incredibly high temps. The weak point will be the epoxies.

Ambient-cured epoxies will typically begin breaking down around 180-200 deg F. We have one ambient cure that will go as high as 300 deg F, and heat-cured epoxies that will go up to around 500 F. As you get into the high temp ratings, the epoxies get trickier to handle, install, cure.

Typically you will see discoloration in the epoxies once you have exceeded thier Tg. This is a sign that you have lost integrity.

Link Posted: 1/19/2015 12:02:52 PM EST
Phenolic resin would get you to 220 C.
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 12:03:25 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mustangduckk:


Engineer checking in, I design and sell repairs into heavy industry using composites, typically carbon fiber.

The carbon fiber itself will withstand incredibly high temps. The weak point will be the epoxies.

Ambient-cured epoxies will typically begin breaking down around 180-200 deg F. We have one ambient cure that will go as high as 300 deg F, and heat-cured epoxies that will go up to around 500 F. As you get into the high temp ratings, the epoxies get trickier to handle, install, cure.

Typically you will see discoloration in the epoxies once you have exceeded thier Tg. This is a sign that you have lost integrity.

View Quote


Best answer yet. I knew the epoxies/resin would be what melted or failed vs the actual carbon fiber.

Hmm - well someone get one of these idiots with more money than brains and see how long a PRI carbon fiber free float tube will last
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 12:07:44 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Mister44:


Best answer yet. I knew the epoxies/resin would be what melted or failed vs the actual carbon fiber.

Hmm - well someone get one of these idiots with more money than brains and see how long a PRI carbon fiber free float tube will last
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Mister44:
Originally Posted By mustangduckk:


Engineer checking in, I design and sell repairs into heavy industry using composites, typically carbon fiber.

The carbon fiber itself will withstand incredibly high temps. The weak point will be the epoxies.

Ambient-cured epoxies will typically begin breaking down around 180-200 deg F. We have one ambient cure that will go as high as 300 deg F, and heat-cured epoxies that will go up to around 500 F. As you get into the high temp ratings, the epoxies get trickier to handle, install, cure.

Typically you will see discoloration in the epoxies once you have exceeded thier Tg. This is a sign that you have lost integrity.



Best answer yet. I knew the epoxies/resin would be what melted or failed vs the actual carbon fiber.

Hmm - well someone get one of these idiots with more money than brains and see how long a PRI carbon fiber free float tube will last

Send me 2 and I'll destroy one for you. I want one for a build.
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 12:19:47 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/19/2015 12:21:06 PM EST by Mister44]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dillehayd:

Send me 2 and I'll destroy one for you. I want one for a build.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dillehayd:
Originally Posted By Mister44:
Originally Posted By mustangduckk:


Engineer checking in, I design and sell repairs into heavy industry using composites, typically carbon fiber.

The carbon fiber itself will withstand incredibly high temps. The weak point will be the epoxies.

Ambient-cured epoxies will typically begin breaking down around 180-200 deg F. We have one ambient cure that will go as high as 300 deg F, and heat-cured epoxies that will go up to around 500 F. As you get into the high temp ratings, the epoxies get trickier to handle, install, cure.

Typically you will see discoloration in the epoxies once you have exceeded thier Tg. This is a sign that you have lost integrity.



Best answer yet. I knew the epoxies/resin would be what melted or failed vs the actual carbon fiber.

Hmm - well someone get one of these idiots with more money than brains and see how long a PRI carbon fiber free float tube will last

Send me 2 and I'll destroy one for you. I want one for a build.


Haha - no you have me confused with someone with extra money to burn.

Best I can do is show a pic...


Link Posted: 1/19/2015 4:17:46 PM EST
The melting point of carbon is 3652 C.

Under ordinary conditions, it ain't going to melt, but in an oxygen atmosphere, it will ignite, and burn to carbon dioxide.
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