Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
Posted: 5/31/2001 4:44:52 AM EST
I've been told it is to dry-fire, dry-fire, dry-fire. I had a firearms instructor who did this hundreds of times each and every day. He is an excellent shot and has even won several national shooting championships. Does anyone else agree with this? Just curious... Ian
Link Posted: 5/31/2001 4:54:26 AM EST
Unlike many other "sports," competetive / accuracy shooting is a series of deliberate actions and motions all controlled under concentration and mental discipline. Most other sports key on instinct and rapid motor skills. Shooting does not. Dry firing is very beneficial, if you follow the same deliberate steps that you would in a match. You've got to focus on - 1. breathing control. 2. Natural point of aim 3. Slow steady squeeze-off 4. good follow thru Essentially, you want to develop a steady rhythm. Dry firing is most beneficial if you are simulating all of the conditions of and focusing on the same things as you would during a match. That said, all the dry firing practice in the world WILL NOT simulate match pressure. Only shooting matches can simulate match pressure. Therefore, while dry firing is good, actual match experience will be necessary to actually shoot well in a match.
Link Posted: 5/31/2001 5:02:06 AM EST
The best way to improve Accuracy is to JOIN THE MARINES!
Link Posted: 5/31/2001 5:53:21 AM EST
Link Posted: 5/31/2001 6:15:37 AM EST
Remember brass, and or bras Breathe, Relax (natural point of aim), Aim, Squeeze. To improve accuracy, in 3 words, practice, practice, practice.
Link Posted: 5/31/2001 7:07:10 AM EST
The fastest way I improved my accuracy was ,I bought a scope. 35 years ago when I was in nam I was a real good shooter . Now days that scope is realy helps. red man
Link Posted: 5/31/2001 7:20:06 AM EST
My .02 USD...... Keep your old brass. Buy an RWS airgun (don't skimp) Set up the old brass in the basement and shoot it from about 10-15 yards with the airgun. It helps.... don't jack off cause it isn't a "real" gun. Pretend it is, and focus. Shawn
Link Posted: 5/31/2001 8:29:02 AM EST
Stand closer.
Link Posted: 5/31/2001 8:40:17 AM EST
Originally Posted By srv656s: My .02 USD...... Keep your old brass. Buy an RWS airgun (don't skimp) Set up the old brass in the basement and shoot it from about 10-15 yards with the airgun. It helps.... don't jack off cause it isn't a "real" gun. Pretend it is, and focus. Shawn
View Quote
I do this!!!!!!! Except, I own a Beeman R9. In addition to old brass, I got some 25 ft targets that approximate what teh black would look like at 200 yds. The 10 ring is the diameter of one pellet (0.177") Air gun shooting actually improves your follow thru. Since compressed air is used to project the pellet, pressure builds more slowly than in a centerfire cartgidge rifle. Therefore, follow thru is even MORE important, as the pellet takes longer to get out of the barrel than your standard rifle.
Link Posted: 5/31/2001 8:55:57 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/31/2001 8:54:52 AM EST by Chimborazo]
Is it bad to dry fire ARs without using dummy rounds? What about 1911s? I get many different answers about 1911s, and have never asked about ARs. Editid fer spelin'
Link Posted: 5/31/2001 9:03:21 AM EST
Originally Posted By Chimborazo: Is it bad to dry fire ARs without using dummy rounds? What about 1911s? I get many different answers about 1911s, and have never asked about ARs. Editid fer spelin'
View Quote
I've heard it is bad to dry fire an AR. I don't remeber who told me, but it was on the old AR-15 board. Now that I think about it, I have always heard it is bad to dryfire your rifles and shotguns. I was referring to a handgun my initial post. I'm sure someone out there could clarify on dry firing your AR..?
Link Posted: 5/31/2001 9:54:18 AM EST
Link Posted: 5/31/2001 10:00:57 AM EST
Link Posted: 5/31/2001 10:33:49 AM EST
[b]B[/b]reathe [b]R[/b]elax [b]A[/b]im [b]S[/b]top breathing [b]S[/b]queeze [b]F[/b]ollow through This is what I learned at Parris Island. In addition, I learned a technique that would go between the Relax and the Aim. Take the slack out of the trigger just before you aim in on the target. That way there is no movement of the weapon after you are aimed in, just the drop of the hammer. Also, like the other Marines here, I dry-fired my M16A2 thousands of times. Of course, any cracked bolt faces or screwed up firing pins were the responsibility of the unit armorer and were done on Uncle Sam's dime, but that was how we were trained. If you have any doubts about this, get snap caps. FMCDH Semper Fidelis Jarhead out. ----------------- "One hundred rounds do not constitute firepower. One hit constitutes firepower." --General Merritt “Red Mike” Edson, USMC
Top Top