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Posted: 9/30/2007 2:37:30 PM EST
So I'm working on painting my house, learning quite a bit as I go. I've been using Lacquer Thinner to clean my brushes, and it seems to work pretty well at that. Trouble is, I don't know what to do with the used stuff. All the can says is "Dispose in accordance with regulations", etc. I can't find any reference to anything more specific than that on the web. What say you guys on the subject?

Link Posted: 9/30/2007 3:17:06 PM EST

Originally Posted By DuraToTheMax:
Are you using oil based paint on your house?

Latex is the most commonly used, which is water soluble. Even oil paint will clean up with mineral spirits, why are you using laquer thinner?


The paint is acrylic latex. Water works okay for the most part, at least while the paint is still wet, but the laquer thinner seems to do a better job on partially dried paint.

Link Posted: 9/30/2007 4:26:24 PM EST
Pour it in a metal bucket and add a small amount of gas and burn it.
Link Posted: 9/30/2007 7:02:04 PM EST

Originally Posted By DuraToTheMax:
My advice is to use laquer thinner sparingly, it's expensive and a bitch to get rid of. If I only have a small quantity I usually just pour it out somewhere

If you're already done, nevermind but if you're just getting started-

Use inexpensive rollers, and throw them out at the end of the day, or leave them in the bucket. You can wrap your brushes in plastic when you're done or taking a break and they won't dry out. If you notice paint starting to dry on your brush, just rinse it out with water and go back to work. A wire brush helps to get dried paint off a brush.

I'm a General Contactor and though I hate to paint, I have done quite a bit of it.


The rollers I haven't had much trouble with. I can usually keep using them even if the paint dries on them some, though I rinse off as much paint as I can, which seems to keep them going better. The brushes are harder, though, since the bristles bunch up and get stiff if any paint dries on them. I usually rinse them off after a painting session, but if I forget or wait too long, the thinner helps a lot. I might try the plastic one, though.

I don't mind it much, especially when I can do it at my own pace.

Link Posted: 9/30/2007 7:04:06 PM EST

Originally Posted By NavajoGunOwner:
Pour it in a metal bucket and add a small amount of gas and burn it.


Good fun , but that sort of thing takes a remarkably long time to burn, and God help you if you spill it before it's done. Don't ask how I know.

Link Posted: 9/30/2007 7:34:39 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2007 7:36:08 PM EST by Waldo0506]

Originally Posted By mace:

Originally Posted By DuraToTheMax:
My advice is to use laquer thinner sparingly, it's expensive and a bitch to get rid of. If I only have a small quantity I usually just pour it out somewhere

If you're already done, nevermind but if you're just getting started-

Use inexpensive rollers, and throw them out at the end of the day, or leave them in the bucket. You can wrap your brushes in plastic when you're done or taking a break and they won't dry out. If you notice paint starting to dry on your brush, just rinse it out with water and go back to work. A wire brush helps to get dried paint off a brush.

I'm a General Contactor and though I hate to paint, I have done quite a bit of it.




The rollers I haven't had much trouble with. I can usually keep using them even if the paint dries on them some, though I rinse off as much paint as I can, which seems to keep them going better. The brushes are harder, though, since the bristles bunch up and get stiff if any paint dries on them. I usually rinse them off after a painting session, but if I forget or wait too long, the thinner helps a lot. I might try the plastic one, though.

I don't mind it much, especially when I can do it at my own pace.



the brush comb is your friend.
Link Posted: 9/30/2007 8:05:10 PM EST
Most of your government (city, county, ect) owned land fills will have a hazardous waste disposal site. Call before going. Sometimes the hours are limited. (They are in ID and WA). Most will take small quantities, (under 5 gallons) for free. Quantities over 5 gallons may require the services of a company like Safety Kleen or, multiple trips to the landfill. Dumping is a BAD idea in many different ways. Call your city/county landfill.
Link Posted: 10/1/2007 4:27:21 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/1/2007 4:32:33 AM EST by brickeyee]
For small amounts evaporate the stuff.


I clean the bruches out in water, then give them a run through MEK to strip anything remaining out.
Alkyd gets cleaned in paint thinner, then through the MEK.
Let the solvenrt settle for a week and you can pour off the liquid and leave the junk behind.
Freshen up the pour off with some new solvent and keep going.

You can reduce bruch loading at the heel of you charge the brush well with the matching solvent (water or paint thinner) before use.
Dip the bruch into clean solvent all the way to the ferule, then shake off the excess solvent.

I have brushes pushing 30 years and still going strong.
Link Posted: 10/2/2007 4:10:24 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/2/2007 4:11:50 AM EST by brickeyee]
"I'm lucky to not loose the extra ones in the multi pack."

When you use $15 and up brushes you make the, last.
My Badger hair brushes are about 20 years old, and even then ran around $30 each.

Link Posted: 10/8/2007 8:00:27 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/8/2007 8:01:04 PM EST by I_M_2_SANE]
Can you just use a live badger and let it go when you're done for the day? It would save on clean up time quite a bit.
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