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Posted: 1/16/2015 8:59:10 PM EST
Did I miss a thread on this?
http://www.space.com/28284-planet-x-worlds-beyond-pluto.html

"Planet X" might actually exist — and so might "Planet Y."

At least two planets larger than Earth likely lurk in the dark depths of space far beyond Pluto, just waiting to be discovered, a new analysis of the orbits of "extreme trans-Neptunian objects" (ETNOs) suggests.

Researchers studied 13 ETNOs — frigid bodies such as the dwarf planet Sedna that cruise around the sun at great distances in elliptical paths. [Meet Our Solar System's Dwarf Planets]

Theory predicts a certain set of details for ETNO orbits, study team members said. For example, they should have a semi-major axis, or average distance from the sun, of about 150 astronomical units (AU). (1 AU is the distance from Earth to the sun — roughly 93 million miles, or 150 million kilometers.) These orbits should also have an inclination, relative to the plane of the solar system, of almost 0 degrees, among other characteristics.

But the actual orbits of the 13 ETNOs are quite different, with semi-major axes ranging from 150 to 525 AU and average inclinations of about 20 degrees.

"This excess of objects with unexpected orbital parameters makes us believe that some invisible forces are altering the distribution of the orbital elements of the ETNOs, and we consider that the most probable explanation is that other unknown planets exist beyond Neptune and Pluto," lead author Carlos de la Fuente Marcos, of the Complutense University of Madrid, said in a statement.

"The exact number is uncertain, given that the data that we have is limited, but our calculations suggest that there are at least two planets, and probably more, within the confines of our solar system," he added.

The potential undiscovered worlds would be more massive than Earth, researchers said, and would lie about 200 AU or more from the sun — so far away that they'd be very difficult, if not impossible, to spot with current instruments.

...
Trujillo and Sheppard suggested that the orbits of 2012 VP113 and Sedna are consistent with the continued presence of a big "perturber" — perhaps a planet 10 times more massive than Earth that lies 250 AU from the sun.

..

"If it is confirmed, our results may be truly revolutionary for astronomy," de la Fuente Marcos said.

Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:00:36 PM EST
Getting nothin but static on Planet Z
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:00:36 PM EST
There's only 9, counting Pluto. The end.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:01:38 PM EST
Oh, oh! Here comes Neburu, the home of the Anonaki race. According to the Mayan calendar, they are over due.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:02:06 PM EST
IBU



In Before Uranus.





Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:03:35 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DoTheLindyHop:
Oh, oh! Here comes Neburu, the home of the Anonaki race. According to the Mayan calendar, they are over due.
View Quote
Screw that, just make sure no one breaks the Seal of Repulsion.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:04:27 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BiggiBen:
IBU



In Before Uranus.





View Quote



That's what she said.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:05:19 PM EST
Something, something uranus.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:07:04 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DoTheLindyHop:
Oh, oh! Here comes Neburu, the home of the Anonaki race. According to the Mayan calendar, they are over due.
View Quote


That's cool. I want to be the first guy to bang an alien chick.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:07:28 PM EST
Well fuck. If we can't even figure out our own solar system what confidence do I have in anything else.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:09:24 PM EST

Wouldn't it technically be planet IX and X, since pluto got demoted?
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:11:10 PM EST
How are we finding earth like planets in other solar systems....yet we don't know if there are hidden planets in our own?

Explain please.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:11:42 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ak4784:
How are we finding earth like planets in other solar systems....yet we don't know if there are hidden planets in our own?

Explain please.
View Quote


Vastly different methods of searching.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:12:40 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ak4784:
How are we finding earth like planets in other solar systems....yet we don't know if there are hidden planets in our own?

Explain please.
View Quote


We see those other planets passing in front of their stars. Kind of hard to do that with our own solar system.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:13:45 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By GrasshopperNOmore:


That's cool. I want to be the first guy to bang an alien chick.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By GrasshopperNOmore:
Originally Posted By DoTheLindyHop:
Oh, oh! Here comes Neburu, the home of the Anonaki race. According to the Mayan calendar, they are over due.


That's cool. I want to be the first guy to bang an alien chick.
What, you've never smashed a chick with a visa/green card?
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:14:06 PM EST
That's no moon.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:14:42 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By FeebMaster:

Wouldn't it technically be planet IX and X, since pluto got demoted?
View Quote
I, for one, can't wait to enjoy the Ixian technology.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:14:57 PM EST
Yadda, yadda, yadda...Uranus
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:15:42 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ak4784:
How are we finding earth like planets in other solar systems....yet we don't know if there are hidden planets in our own?

Explain please.
View Quote


We find planets that are very close to their star by observing the tiny variations they cause in the light shining from that star. Finding something that far away from a star is very, very difficult due to the lack of light reflecting on the object.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:15:52 PM EST
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Originally Posted By AR4U:
I, for one, can't wait to enjoy the Ixian technology.
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Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By FeebMaster:

Wouldn't it technically be planet IX and X, since pluto got demoted?
I, for one, can't wait to enjoy the Ixian technology.


The spice must flow.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:16:15 PM EST
Final Fantasy ETNO
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:16:21 PM EST
I was under the understanding that the odd orbits of Neptune and Uranus were already explained by the cross-orbital theory - dependent on a peculiar alignment of the planets and concerning their, thereby, peculiar gravitational pull on each-other - which cast them into their current, rather bizarre orbits.

Of course, I'm explaining it horribly - but, I'll blame the Makers 46 for that!
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:19:16 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/16/2015 9:20:52 PM EST by DoTheLindyHop]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By GrasshopperNOmore:


That's cool. I want to be the first guy to bang an alien chick.
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Originally Posted By GrasshopperNOmore:
Originally Posted By DoTheLindyHop:
Oh, oh! Here comes Neburu, the home of the Anonaki race. According to the Mayan calendar, they are over due.


That's cool. I want to be the first guy to bang an alien chick.


Uh um. It's all fun and game to you now. Just wait until Neburu comes draggin' all that space junk behind him, showering earth with rains of space irons and rocks. Do you even Coast to Coast, son?
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:19:51 PM EST
My healing crystal vendor knew all about Nibiru way before the scientists did.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:21:13 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RikWriter:


We find planets that are very close to their star by observing the tiny variations they cause in the light shining from that star. Finding something that far away from a star is very, very difficult due to the lack of light reflecting on the object.
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Originally Posted By RikWriter:
Originally Posted By ak4784:
How are we finding earth like planets in other solar systems....yet we don't know if there are hidden planets in our own?

Explain please.


We find planets that are very close to their star by observing the tiny variations they cause in the light shining from that star. Finding something that far away from a star is very, very difficult due to the lack of light reflecting on the object.


What if these Spaniards in the article were to land a probe on Uranus?
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:22:01 PM EST


Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:22:05 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Tomislav:
My healing crystal vendor knew all about Nibiru way before the scientists did.
View Quote


Shit! You even spelled it right. George Noori would be so proud!
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:23:39 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RikWriter:


We find planets that are very close to their star by observing the tiny variations they cause in the light shining from that star. Finding something that far away from a star is very, very difficult due to the lack of light reflecting on the object.
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Originally Posted By RikWriter:
Originally Posted By ak4784:
How are we finding earth like planets in other solar systems....yet we don't know if there are hidden planets in our own?

Explain please.


We find planets that are very close to their star by observing the tiny variations they cause in the light shining from that star. Finding something that far away from a star is very, very difficult due to the lack of light reflecting on the object.


Also something about the way the stars "wobble" due to gravitational interactions between the stars and the planets.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:27:52 PM EST
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:29:21 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By raven:
There's only 9, counting Pluto. The end.
View Quote


Can't count Pluto if you don't count Eris.

Instead of subtracting planets from the list, we should keep adding. It makes science more interesting to kids.

Mercury
Venus
Earth
Mars
Ceres
Jupiter
Saturn
Uranus
Neptune
Pluto
Haumea
Makemake
Eris
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:29:34 PM EST
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Originally Posted By ultramagbrion:
Getting nothin but static on Planet Z
View Quote


L O L!
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:30:28 PM EST
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:30:46 PM EST
And...."That's no moon."
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:31:03 PM EST
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Originally Posted By krpind:
If true, why wouldn't we have seen their gravitational effects on various objects that have passed through our solar system?

I guess it is possible that their orbits are so large that it could take centuries to rotate the sun, but at some point the sun would lose them and they just fly out into space??

I'm in no position to argue this, but I would have thought we would have seen their effects by now even if they weren't easily visible.

Interesting stuff.
View Quote

They compared it to Sedna, which has an insanely far orbit.

Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:31:51 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/16/2015 9:32:57 PM EST by ErikS]
Keep in mind that most stars are binary this could indicate a brown dwarf that we just have not noticed yet because we have not looked for it. They don't emit in the visible spectrum much or at all though they do show up in IR and do perturb orbits of the other bodies in the system. If they are so far out they may not affect the orbits of the closer in objects in any initially noticeable way but after studying the orbits of those bodies for a long time we can detect the slight wobbles and variances.

I say do more research and don't rule it out or confirm it until the evidence is in and it passes a peer review.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:32:44 PM EST
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Originally Posted By FeebMaster:

Wouldn't it technically be planet IX and X, since pluto got demoted?
View Quote
Pluto got voted back in.

Getting ready to find out a lot more about Pluto in the next year - New Horizons arrives.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:35:50 PM EST
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Originally Posted By GrasshopperNOmore:


That's cool. I want to be the first guy to bang an alien chick.
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Originally Posted By GrasshopperNOmore:
Originally Posted By DoTheLindyHop:
Oh, oh! Here comes Neburu, the home of the Anonaki race. According to the Mayan calendar, they are over due.


That's cool. I want to be the first guy to bang an alien chick.

Neva been dun befo
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:36:02 PM EST
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:36:06 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Snips:

They compared it to Sedna, which has an insanely far orbit.

http://www.newscientist.com/data/images/ns/cms/dn6295/dn6295-1_834.jpg
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Originally Posted By Snips:
Originally Posted By krpind:
If true, why wouldn't we have seen their gravitational effects on various objects that have passed through our solar system?

I guess it is possible that their orbits are so large that it could take centuries to rotate the sun, but at some point the sun would lose them and they just fly out into space??

I'm in no position to argue this, but I would have thought we would have seen their effects by now even if they weren't easily visible.

Interesting stuff.

They compared it to Sedna, which has an insanely far orbit.

http://www.newscientist.com/data/images/ns/cms/dn6295/dn6295-1_834.jpg



Holy crap. Voyager 1 is only 130 AUs from the sun.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:36:54 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ak4784:
How are we finding earth like planets in other solar systems....yet we don't know if there are hidden planets in our own?

Explain please.
View Quote


Beer goggles
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:37:06 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ErikS:
Keep in mind that most stars are binary this could indicate a brown dwarf that we just have not noticed yet because we have not looked for it. They don't emit in the visible spectrum much or at all though they do show up in IR and do perturb orbits of the other bodies in the system. If they are so far out they may not affect the orbits of the closer in objects in any initially noticeable way but after studying the orbits of those bodies for a long time we can detect the slight wobbles and variances.

I say do more research and don't rule it out or confirm it until the evidence is in and it passes a peer review.
View Quote
I find it difficult to believe we'd miss something that IR active nearby. In that band it would be like not noticing the tactical nuke going off across town.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:37:45 PM EST
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Originally Posted By krpind:
Originally Posted By DoTheLindyHop:
Originally Posted By RikWriter:
Originally Posted By ak4784:
How are we finding earth like planets in other solar systems....yet we don't know if there are hidden planets in our own?

Explain please.


We find planets that are very close to their star by observing the tiny variations they cause in the light shining from that star. Finding something that far away from a star is very, very difficult due to the lack of light reflecting on the object.


Also something about the way the stars "wobble" due to gravitational interactions between the stars and the planets.


http://www.planetary.org/explore/space-topics/exoplanets/how-to-search-for-exoplanets.html


THANKS! Who says that GD is completely useless?
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:39:50 PM EST
I say we leave Planet X alone:


Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:40:19 PM EST

Chaos

there's space pirates there
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:41:50 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AR4U:
I find it difficult to believe we'd miss something that IR active nearby. In that band it would be like not noticing the tactical nuke going off across town.
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Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By ErikS:
Keep in mind that most stars are binary this could indicate a brown dwarf that we just have not noticed yet because we have not looked for it. They don't emit in the visible spectrum much or at all though they do show up in IR and do perturb orbits of the other bodies in the system. If they are so far out they may not affect the orbits of the closer in objects in any initially noticeable way but after studying the orbits of those bodies for a long time we can detect the slight wobbles and variances.

I say do more research and don't rule it out or confirm it until the evidence is in and it passes a peer review.
I find it difficult to believe we'd miss something that IR active nearby. In that band it would be like not noticing the tactical nuke going off across town.


Not to mention that such a large source of gravity would cause our solar system to have eccentricities which could not be explained by our current single star model.

If I remember correctly, we found Neptune by first observing the orbit of Uranus and working out the type of gravitational interference that would be required to cause that orbit and then predicting where that source of gravity would be in the solar system. And this was in the mid-1800s. Another star would have already been spotted using such methods.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:45:26 PM EST
MULTI-PASS!!!!

nah, doesn't matter right? there's a three planet sweet spot in this solarsystem for life right? right?

ballbearings these days.






Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:47:50 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jDrexler:


Can't count Pluto if you don't count Eris.

Instead of subtracting planets from the list, we should keep adding. It makes science more interesting to kids.

Mercury
Venus
Earth
Mars
Ceres
Jupiter
Saturn
Uranus
Neptune
Pluto
Haumea
Makemake
Eris
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Originally Posted By jDrexler:
Originally Posted By raven:
There's only 9, counting Pluto. The end.


Can't count Pluto if you don't count Eris.

Instead of subtracting planets from the list, we should keep adding. It makes science more interesting to kids.

Mercury
Venus
Earth
Mars
Ceres
Jupiter
Saturn
Uranus
Neptune
Pluto
Haumea
Makemake
Eris


YOU SIR!!!! get the post of the thread award.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:56:40 PM EST
Originally Posted By Andras:
Did I miss a thread on this?
http://www.space.com/28284-planet-x-worlds-beyond-pluto.html

"Planet X" might actually exist — and so might "Planet Y."

At least two planets larger than Earth likely lurk in the dark depths of space far beyond Pluto, just waiting to be discovered, a new analysis of the orbits of "extreme trans-Neptunian objects" (ETNOs) suggests.

Researchers studied 13 ETNOs — frigid bodies such as the dwarf planet Sedna that cruise around the sun at great distances in elliptical paths. [Meet Our Solar System's Dwarf Planets]

Theory predicts a certain set of details for ETNO orbits, study team members said. For example, they should have a semi-major axis, or average distance from the sun, of about 150 astronomical units (AU). (1 AU is the distance from Earth to the sun — roughly 93 million miles, or 150 million kilometers.) These orbits should also have an inclination, relative to the plane of the solar system, of almost 0 degrees, among other characteristics.

But the actual orbits of the 13 ETNOs are quite different, with semi-major axes ranging from 150 to 525 AU and average inclinations of about 20 degrees.

"This excess of objects with unexpected orbital parameters makes us believe that some invisible forces are altering the distribution of the orbital elements of the ETNOs, and we consider that the most probable explanation is that other unknown planets exist beyond Neptune and Pluto," lead author Carlos de la Fuente Marcos, of the Complutense University of Madrid, said in a statement.

"The exact number is uncertain, given that the data that we have is limited, but our calculations suggest that there are at least two planets, and probably more, within the confines of our solar system," he added.

The potential undiscovered worlds would be more massive than Earth, researchers said, and would lie about 200 AU or more from the sun — so far away that they'd be very difficult, if not impossible, to spot with current instruments.

...
Trujillo and Sheppard suggested that the orbits of 2012 VP113 and Sedna are consistent with the continued presence of a big "perturber" — perhaps a planet 10 times more massive than Earth that lies 250 AU from the sun.

..

"If it is confirmed, our results may be truly revolutionary for astronomy," de la Fuente Marcos said.

View Quote


I was just thinking this same thing about 2 weeks ago.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 9:58:49 PM EST
Prepare your anus.



Link Posted: 1/16/2015 10:08:49 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By GrasshopperNOmore:


That's cool. I want to be the first guy to bang an alien chick.
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Originally Posted By GrasshopperNOmore:
Originally Posted By DoTheLindyHop:
Oh, oh! Here comes Neburu, the home of the Anonaki race. According to the Mayan calendar, they are over due.


That's cool. I want to be the first guy to bang an alien chick.


What you don't know is alien chick bangs YOU!
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 10:11:15 PM EST
There was an article on Universe Today on the twelfth that claimed that all of the bright objects in the Kuiper belt had most likely already been found.
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