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1/16/2020 9:48:49 PM
Posted: 11/20/2012 10:39:15 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/20/2012 10:54:04 AM EST by airgunner]
OK - we are looking to do something different this year so I'm thinking about brine'ing and then deep frying a Turkey.

I've been reading up on the process online and as usually, there are any number of different recipes and instructions. The recipes typically all have salt, sugar and water in common but from there they all vary on the remaining ingredients depending on the flavor they are trying to achieve. I'm OK with that part.

For the actual instructions I've seen everything from 1 hour\pound to 24-48 hours all the way to 3 days plus. After that I've seen everything from a simply rinsing the remaining salts off to soaking the bird for up to 24hours to fully de-salt the bird. That's where I get a little iffy....

I understand that the salt during the brine will soak into the meat which causes some sort of chemical reaction that helps the meat retain moisture. I also understand this process takes time and that cutting it short will not allow the process work fully. I'm thinking 24 hours seems like a reasonable target? I also understand that this effect is permanent and can't be undone by removing the excess salt afterwords. I'm still with ya to this point but what I don't get is, why do some people recommend soaking the bird in clean water for up to 24 hours after the brine? Seems to me that a thorough wash with clean water would accomplish pretty much the same thing? I would also be leery of an extended soak possibly removing (or at least weakening) any of the flavors you just imparted during the brine process?

I realize I'm over thinking it. I guess I'm just curious to see how many of you feel the needs to soak the bird in clean water for any extended amount of time AFTER the brine process and if you do, why?


Link Posted: 11/20/2012 10:48:21 AM EST
I have been brining our turkey for the last 4 years. 12 to 24 hours is plenty of soak time for a 16 to 20 lbs turkey. As far as soaking it in clean water afterwards makes no since to me. I just pull it out of the brine, wash is off and pat it dry with papertowles.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 10:55:52 AM EST
Originally Posted By jeadams:
I have been brining our turkey for the last 4 years. 12 to 24 hours is plenty of soak time for a 16 to 20 lbs turkey. As far as soaking it in clean water afterwards makes no since to me. I just pull it out of the brine, wash is off and pat it dry with papertowles.

That's pretty much what I was thinking but it's always nice to hear from those that have already been there, done that. Thanks!

Link Posted: 11/20/2012 11:16:36 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 11:21:42 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/20/2012 11:23:36 AM EST by Winn]
Originally Posted By Zhukov:

I wonder if you need to brine a turkey that's going in the deep fryer. The whole thing with a deep fryer is that the high temperature crusts over and prevents the juices from escaping AFAIK. Injecting a turkey that's going in the deep fryer is a good idea though. I never brined the few that I deep fried and was very happy with it.


Was going to say basically the same thing.

I wouldn't bother with brining if I were going to use a deep fryer.



Link Posted: 11/20/2012 11:37:41 AM EST
Originally Posted By Zhukov:
I wonder if you need to brine a turkey that's going in the deep fryer. The whole thing with a deep fryer is that the high temperature crusts over and prevents the juices from escaping AFAIK. Injecting a turkey that's going in the deep fryer is a good idea though. I never brined the few that I deep fried and was very happy with it.


This.

Never brined it, just cleaned it, dry rubbed it, injected it (letting it sit over night to marinate) then tossed it in the pot. Came out perfect every time.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 2:42:44 PM EST
First: Make sure the turkey you buy does not say "contains up to 8% (varies) of a solution containing salt, blah blah blah". If it does, the turkey is already brined, and you can't really brine it. Most of the ones on sale right now are like this. You need to buy a "natural" or "fresh" or "country" turkey (or kill your own).

Second: The salt (use large granule kosher salt, it has no iodine (bitter)), sugar, and water (non-chlorinated (bitter)) are the most important part. The basics. After that, you can tweak it with different flavors. These tweaks do not add "that much" to the flavor.

My take: I use 1 tablespoon large grain kosher salt, 1 tablespoon sugar, and 1 tablespoon "Accent" to 2 cups water. Multiply up to get enough brine for your bird. You can sub honey for sugar. Slightly different flavor. I use an oven bag, so I don't need that much brine to cover the bird. Put oven bag in 5 gallon bucket (or other suitable container), put in the bird (breast down-ish), pour in the brine, squeeze enough air out that the brine covers the bird, and seal the bag. Put in a cool place overnight.

To cook: Remove bird and pat dry. Salt and pepper inside and out. Roast at 450 for the first 45 min or so, reduce heat to 300 and go another 2 hours. Baste with drippings after the first hour. This a a basic recipe. If you're frying the bird, I think the rule of thumb is 4 minutes per pound.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 3:45:39 PM EST
Originally Posted By Zhukov:
I wonder if you need to brine a turkey that's going in the deep fryer. The whole thing with a deep fryer is that the high temperature crusts over and prevents the juices from escaping AFAIK. Injecting a turkey that's going in the deep fryer is a good idea though. I never brined the few that I deep fried and was very happy with it.


not only do you add moisture but also salt.. Always brine.


not saying frying alone is not good just saying brine and fry is better.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:31:09 PM EST
I've always done 24 hours or so, rinse , dry, season and roast. Good stuff.
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 4:01:43 AM EST
Originally Posted By Zhukov:
I wonder if you need to brine a turkey that's going in the deep fryer.

Well I guess this is all academic now anyway as it turns out the bird the wife got is one of those pre-brined birds.

Anyway - thank you all for the help and suggestions

Link Posted: 11/21/2012 7:19:11 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 7:33:21 AM EST

Originally Posted By jeadams:
I have been brining our turkey for the last 4 years. 12 to 24 hours is plenty of soak time for a 16 to 20 lbs turkey. As far as soaking it in clean water afterwards makes no since to me. I just pull it out of the brine, wash is off and pat it dry with papertowles.

+87

Rinse, pat dry. That's it. No re-soaking it.

The salt is part of what makes it good! People won't salt a brined turkey because it's already perfect.

Plus, additional soaking time is additional risk of bacteria invasion. There is NO UP SIDE to soaking in water.

If you have hyper tension and can't handle that much salt (it's not much), eat something else for Thanksgiving.
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 7:35:57 AM EST

Originally Posted By manowar669:
First: Make sure the turkey you buy does not say "contains up to 8% (varies) of a solution containing salt, blah blah blah". If it does, the turkey is already brined, and you can't really brine it. Most of the ones on sale right now are like this. You need to buy a "natural" or "fresh" or "country" turkey (or kill your own).

Second: The salt (use large granule kosher salt, it has no iodine (bitter)), sugar, and water (non-chlorinated (bitter)) are the most important part. The basics. After that, you can tweak it with different flavors. These tweaks do not add "that much" to the flavor.

My take: I use 1 tablespoon large grain kosher salt, 1 tablespoon sugar, and 1 tablespoon "Accent" to 2 cups water. Multiply up to get enough brine for your bird. You can sub honey for sugar. Slightly different flavor. I use an oven bag, so I don't need that much brine to cover the bird. Put oven bag in 5 gallon bucket (or other suitable container), put in the bird (breast down-ish), pour in the brine, squeeze enough air out that the brine covers the bird, and seal the bag. Put in a cool place overnight.

To cook: Remove bird and pat dry. Salt and pepper inside and out. Roast at 450 for the first 45 min or so, reduce heat to 300 and go another 2 hours. Baste with drippings after the first hour. This a a basic recipe. If you're frying the bird, I think the rule of thumb is 4 minutes per pound.

They say that so they can add the bag of "starter" to the inside to bulk up the weight. The "Turkey" becomes "turkey plus bag of water for extra weight" which is up to 8% of the bird.

They are not brined, unless they say they are brined.

It's just a ripoff / sales method you are seeing.
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