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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/29/2005 5:47:25 PM EDT
Whats signifigance does the treadware rating have? How many miles is it rated for? Or does it depend too much on the situation. I understand that 200 lasts half as long as 400 and all that jazz but was just wondering what it equaled in approximate mileage


Single_Shot
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 6:24:51 PM EDT
It is somewhat hard to say. You cant compare the ratings between manufacturers, so I have never paid much attention to them. You can get a very general idea of how long the tire will last by them though. A quality tire with a 400 treadware should be good for around 45K. The 90K michelin hydroedge has a 760 or 780 rating. The best way to go is ask one of the guys who have been working in the shop for a few years what they see people getting out of the tire.

What kind of tires are you looking at?
Link Posted: 10/1/2005 4:53:32 AM EDT
I just bought a Wheel Combo off ebay for my car and was wondering how long they would hold up.

The tires are Nankang NS-1 245-45-17
Link Posted: 10/1/2005 8:17:50 PM EDT
What is the treadwear rating on that particular tire? Usually a low profile like that will be around the 300's which will probably last about 20,000 miles. The Spec V I just got rid of had BFG G Force KD's on it which had a treadwear rating of 200. They were 225/45 ZR 17's and didn't even hit the 10,000 mile mark.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 3:46:54 PM EDT
The ratings are not set by the manufactirer, but by the DOT. That's why they're called the "DOT ratings". Treadwear is determined by how hard the rubber is. The three ratings are temp/traction/treadwear. The softer the tire, the higher the traction rating, but the lower the treadwear, etc etc etc. Any tire with higher ratings in all three catagories is a good tire, and will cost more, but last longer. If you're keeping the car for awhile, buy good tires and keep them alighned/inflated. They will pay for themselves in the long run and give you better braking/handling the whole time. If you're selling the car anytime soon, buy cheapo tires and call it a day.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 5:37:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By X_Ring:
The ratings are not set by the manufactirer, but by the DOT.

This is not true .The rating of each given tire is established by the manufacturer of the tire in question and no one else. The STANDARDS were established by the NHTSA/DOT. The only thing on a tire that is DOT qualified is is suitability for highway use

That's why they're called the "DOT ratings".

I am unfamiliar with the term"DOT RATING" but for the sake of conversation we will assume it is synonymous with UTQG rating. The grading is done by the manufacturer to what is SUPPOSED to be a UTQG system. It's a farce and UTQG ratings have little value in the real world.

Treadwear is determined by how hard the rubber is.

Tread compounds are exactly that compounds and as such perform in different ranges of the wear spectrum. Hardness as tested using a durometer offers only some indication of the tread life

The three ratings are temp/traction/treadwear.True

The softer the tire, the higher the traction rating, but the lower the treadwear, etc etc etc.

See statement on compounds above

Any tire with higher ratings in all three catagories is a good tire, and will cost more, but last longer.

If in fact there was any Uniformity in the UTQG this could logicly be assumed to be true.However since the UTQG rating is established by the manufacturer these ratings are little more than sales propaganda.The honesty of the manufacturer only, guides its ratings

If you're keeping the car for awhile, buy good tires and keep them alighned/inflated. They will pay for themselves in the long run and give you better braking/handling the whole time. If you're selling the car anytime soon, buy cheapo tires and call it a day.



See below

www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/rules/import/FMVSS/#P575.104



UNIFORM TIRE QUALITY GRADING STANDARDS
Manufacturers of passenger car tires must provide information on tread life, traction, and temperature resistance. The grades are displayed on the sidewall of the tire, on a label, and in a leaflet available at the tire dealer's store. All tires manufactured after April 1, 1980, are graded. The purpose of this section is to aid the consumer in making an informed choice in the purchase of passenger car tires. This section applies to new pneumatic tires for use on passenger cars. However, this section does not apply to deep tread, winter-type snow tires, space-saver or temporary use spare tires, tires with nominal rim diameters of 254 mm to 305 mm (10 to 12 inches), or to limited production tires as defined in (c)(2) of this section.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 5:39:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SINGLE_SHOT:
I just bought a Wheel Combo off ebay for my car and was wondering how long they would hold up.

The tires are Nankang NS-1 245-45-17



Nankang is a Chinese manufacturer. Expect them to last as long as everything else you ever got from China. Except maybe that SKS
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 6:45:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bgenlvtex:

Originally Posted By X_Ring:
The ratings are not set by the manufactirer, but by the DOT.

This is not true .The rating of each given tire is established by the manufacturer of the tire in question and no one else. The STANDARDS were established by the NHTSA/DOT. The only thing on a tire that is DOT qualified is is suitability for highway use

That's why they're called the "DOT ratings".

I am unfamiliar with the term"DOT RATING" but for the sake of conversation we will assume it is synonymous with UTQG rating. The grading is done by the manufacturer to what is SUPPOSED to be a UTQG system. It's a farce and UTQG ratings have little value in the real world.

Treadwear is determined by how hard the rubber is.

Tread compounds are exactly that compounds and as such perform in different ranges of the wear spectrum. Hardness as tested using a durometer offers only some indication of the tread life

The three ratings are temp/traction/treadwear.True

The softer the tire, the higher the traction rating, but the lower the treadwear, etc etc etc.

See statement on compounds above

Any tire with higher ratings in all three catagories is a good tire, and will cost more, but last longer.

If in fact there was any Uniformity in the UTQG this could logicly be assumed to be true.However since the UTQG rating is established by the manufacturer these ratings are little more than sales propaganda.The honesty of the manufacturer only, guides its ratings

If you're keeping the car for awhile, buy good tires and keep them alighned/inflated. They will pay for themselves in the long run and give you better braking/handling the whole time. If you're selling the car anytime soon, buy cheapo tires and call it a day.



See below

www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/rules/import/FMVSS/#P575.104



UNIFORM TIRE QUALITY GRADING STANDARDS
Manufacturers of passenger car tires must provide information on tread life, traction, and temperature resistance. The grades are displayed on the sidewall of the tire, on a label, and in a leaflet available at the tire dealer's store. All tires manufactured after April 1, 1980, are graded. The purpose of this section is to aid the consumer in making an informed choice in the purchase of passenger car tires. This section applies to new pneumatic tires for use on passenger cars. However, this section does not apply to deep tread, winter-type snow tires, space-saver or temporary use spare tires, tires with nominal rim diameters of 254 mm to 305 mm (10 to 12 inches), or to limited production tires as defined in (c)(2) of this section.



Thanks for digging that up. Seeing them day in and day out, I can tell you with certainty that comparing ratings between manufacturers is apples to oranges. Most people dont realize this, which is truly unfortuante. I dont even look at the darn things as it is a complete waste of my time.
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 4:52:05 PM EDT
UTQG ratings give clues to performance, but not much more. Each manufacturer uses different processes and compounds, so the point of UTQGs is almost moot. Buy the best traction tire you can afford. Mileage really means nothing as the rubber breaks down significantly, and average life of the rubber before it begins to dry rot and come apart is about four years.


damian@adcofirearms.com
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