Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
PSA
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 10/26/2010 10:03:55 AM EDT

Going to a friend's place this weekend, we figured we'd try a little whiskey (and similar alcohols) tasting to compare/contrast the popular but not expensive ($30-$40 per 750ml/liter) stuff out there.




So far from stuff we already own, we have the following:  




-Jonny Walker Black Label

-Crown Royal

-Maker's Mark

-Jack Daniels Old #7

-Jim Beam Black




We also have 2 single-malt scotches (just to compare, SMS day is another time)

-Macallan 12 yr

-Highland park 12 yr







What would be a couple other good choices to include in this tasting that are not single malt scotches or more than $30-$40 per 750ml/liter?













(In before Capt. Cantread replies that we need to buy some $200/bottle 24 yr single malt scotch....)
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:05:09 AM EDT
Evan Williams single barrel vintage

Maker's Mark

Knob Creek
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:05:28 AM EDT
I really love Forty Creek. Fantastic flavor and very smooth.



http://www.fortycreekwhisky.com/history/patiencetimetalent.asp
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:07:07 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/26/2010 10:09:55 AM EDT by Angelshare1]
Glen Goyne is pretty sweet.  Reasonably priced as well.


edit:

For fun, bring this for dessert.  It's like Irish Cream only it's Scottish.  Far more complex and yummy then Bailey's.  You'll never want Bailey's again after this stuff.



Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:07:20 AM EDT
Woodford Reserve

Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:07:49 AM EDT
johnny walker blue
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:10:09 AM EDT
Connemara Single Barrel
Connemara Cask Strength
Jameson's
Tuallamore Dew
Redbreast
Clontarf
Michael Collins
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:10:55 AM EDT
I just had some Leopold Bros Whiskey over the weekend.
Phenomenal tasting stuff, from a small distillery in Denver.
Highly recommend if you can find it, I am though unsure of the cost per bottle.
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:11:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/26/2010 10:14:36 AM EDT by Chairborne]





Originally Posted By VBC:



Woodford Reserve








This!  Blantons too, if it's under the price cap where you are.



Single barrell bourbons you might consider in addition:



Bakers

Bookers

Basil Haydens

Makers Mark 46

Blantons

Pappy Van Winkles (out of price range no doubt)

Buffalo Trace

Jim Beam Rye

Jim Beam Black

Jack Daniels single barrel



If you're looking at whiskeys outside the US:



Bushmills

Jameson

Glenlivet

Glenmorangie

Glenfiddich

many other single malt scotches...





 
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:11:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/26/2010 10:24:47 AM EDT by AR4U]
Woodford reserve, for sure.  
black maple hill bourbon, if you can find it.  Not a lot is made, but it's my fiancee's favorite.
Some rye of some sort?
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:11:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/26/2010 10:15:10 AM EDT by Windustsearch]
Oban scotch and Tangle Ridge Canadian.

Either one is good enough to straighten your toes.
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:14:41 AM EDT
Crown and Makers is pretty good, the rest of that stuff is mix only.





SMS only here, LaPhroaig Quarter Cask, Talisker, Balvennie.





sometimes I slum it, Rich and Rare mixed with some Vernors


Maybe throw some of that in with your midrange stuff for fun.

 
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:18:41 AM EDT
If it's available to you, I'd suggest Pendleton's, which runs about $25.
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:18:46 AM EDT
Cabin Still
Yellowstone
Old Crow

Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:24:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/26/2010 10:28:14 AM EDT by polarbare]
Just for something different - Yamazaki. 12 year single malt whisky from Japan. Technically not a scotch, but it tastes like one. Try it, you'll thank me later. Oh, and relatively cheap at $36 a bottle. FWIW, I switch between this and Oban 14 yr for my regular drinking scotches.



The 18 year Yamazaki is divine, but also $140 a bottle (That one only gets brought out as a treat - same with a Balvenie 21 year).
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:27:04 AM EDT
Since you said whiskey you need to add in Jameson and Redbreast.
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:27:57 AM EDT



Originally Posted By polarbare:


Just for something different - Yamazaki. 12 year single malt whiskey from Japan. Technically not a scotch, but it tastes like one. Try it, you'll thank me later. Oh, and relatively cheap at $36 a bottle. FWIW, I switch between this and Oban for my regular drinking scotches.




 
While not a scotch it is good, and would fit into a whiskey tasting nicely.
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:28:17 AM EDT
Eagle Rare Single Barrel

A rye whiskey such as Jim Beam Rye or WT Russel Reserve Rye
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:29:35 AM EDT
No love for the Kickin' Chicken? Bah.

Wild Turkey 101, bitches.
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:31:42 AM EDT




Originally Posted By PBIR:





Originally Posted By polarbare:

Just for something different - Yamazaki. 12 year single malt whiskey from Japan. Technically not a scotch, but it tastes like one. Try it, you'll thank me later. Oh, and relatively cheap at $36 a bottle. FWIW, I switch between this and Oban for my regular drinking scotches.




While not a scotch it is good, and would fit into a whiskey tasting nicely.




Dang you caught my edit
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:33:41 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:33:46 AM EDT
Has anyone ever tried Stranahan's Colorado Whiskey?
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:34:45 AM EDT
Gentleman Jack

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:35:25 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:44:41 AM EDT
Dickle (Merl Haggards favorite)
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:44:50 AM EDT



Originally Posted By S-1:


Gentleman Jack



Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile






 
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:48:10 AM EDT
Bourbons are for gentlemen, whiskeys are for godless heathens and Canadians.
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:50:21 AM EDT
Bushmill's  BLACKBUSH  you can thank me later
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:54:48 AM EDT
Scoresby.
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:57:03 AM EDT
Ive been drinking alot of this lately

http://www.lairdandcompany.com/index2.htm

Link Posted: 10/26/2010 10:57:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/26/2010 10:59:45 AM EDT by Mazawakhan]





Originally Posted By seattleducati:



If it's available to you, I'd suggest Pendleton's, which runs about $25.






+1 This stuff is great!




 
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 11:00:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/26/2010 11:14:02 AM EDT by scrum]
In the price range you give?



Try Bulleit Bourbon (decent for an economically priced bourbon blend) or Corner Creek (NY) or Sazerac (American rye, pretty raw though)



For American made single malts (I know you said not single malts, but I want to suggest as these two are American and pretty good)







Try McCarthy's (Oregon distillery Clear Creek) . It's Islay style and very peaty. It's not Laphroaig or Lagavulin, but it's a little similar at less than half the price (under $40 in state controlled liquor WA stores). I am looking forward to seeing McCarthy produce and release some very good American single malts in the future.



WA state's Dry Fly distillery is worth looking at too if it's available. A little wheaty for my tastes, but interesting.
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 11:08:50 AM EDT
It is not a good idea to mix varieties of whiskey for a tasting.  It is better to stay with one variety, Bourbon for example.  Because of the characteristics of the different varieties your palate will be compromised and it will become impossible to appreciate the subtleties of the whiskeys sampled.
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 11:24:30 AM EDT
As a whisky drinker I drink Tullymore Dew
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 11:25:52 AM EDT
You're probably right with mixing whiskey types, canadian, scotch, rye, bourbons, bourbon clone sipping whiskeys.  Might make them another event for another night.  

I'm prone to bourbons myself but a bottle of Speyburn single malt will fit nicely in that price range I think.  I found it better to have an ice cube in it and let it melt enough to loosen the scotch up.  It really does change the chemistry as it relates to your tastebuds.
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 11:28:19 AM EDT


Yes, and compare this with a true French Calvados.

It really is great stuff.  You can taste the apples.
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 11:40:03 AM EDT
I suggest you pick a consistent theme as your tasting will be much more enjoyable because your participants can use the theme to pick out differences and commonalities among the spirits in question.

You said:


-Jonny Walker Black Label
-Crown Royal
-Maker's Mark
-Jack Daniels Old #7
-Jim Beam Black


... which makes it very difficult to discern if you have a theme in mind.  

Your list includes one blend from Scotland, one Canadian and some whiskeys from the United States.  Each has its own peculiarities, which makes it difficult to compare them as you've put out too many variables for a novice tasting effort.  Let's take the first one on your list, Johnny Walker Black:

- You are also comparing a whiskey that is blended from distillate from multiple distilleries to US whiskeys that all come from the same distillery.  

- You are comparing a whiskey that was aged in second and third use barrels that have previously contained other spriits (e.g. US bourbon barrels), while all the US bourbons are required to be aged in first-use (brand new) barrels.  

- You are comparing one whiskey that is distilled twice to some US whiskeys that are only distilled once.  

I could go on, but your choices have very little in common except price –– and price doesn't really give you a consistent yardstick in terms of taste.  Taste is paramount in a whiskey ... tasting ... and price should take a back seat.

I suggest you pick a theme (with price as a second consideration).  You'll be much better off because your guests will actually have something meaningful to discuss, beyond "do I like it?"  Why not pick something like "American Bourbons under $40/bottle" so that you'll have less of a wild variation between your tasting candidates?

Example:


- Bulleit
- Jim Beam
- Maker's Mark
- Knob Creek
- Woodford Reserve


All the above are bourbons and have many commonalities, but they also have some subtle differences that can be identified for your guests and they can opine on all of them.  As an example, Woodford Reserve is distilled using solely pot stills while the others are usually distilled using column stills (or both).  Why not start a discussion as to whether your guests prefer pot still distillate to column still distillate?  How about comparing the mashbills of each bourbon and its effect on taste?  

Hope this helps!
Top Top