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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/16/2005 11:21:41 AM EDT
Arizona DPS Getting New Patrol Cars with Fire-Suppression Systems
ASSOCIATED PRESS



PHOENIX (AP) -- The Arizona Department of Public Safety is starting to receive new patrol cars with electronic fire-suppression systems, designed by Ford Motor Co. to reduce the risk of gas-fed fires caused by rear-end collisions.

Such fires are blamed in the horrific fire deaths of 15 police officers nationwide, including three in Arizona.

Authorities say Ford's Crown Victoria Police Interceptors _ the predominant police cars in the nation _ were implicated in the fires because their fuel tanks were susceptible to being punctured by chassis components in a severe rear collision, with the fuel then catching fire.

The fire-suppression system is similar to those used on military vehicles and NASCAR race cars. The system emits a fire-suppressing powder moments after the police car is struck in the rear to quickly douse flames if spilled fuel is ignited after the crash.

The device is an extra-cost option for the police cars, priced at $2,500
and bringing the total to about $35,000 each for the specially built sedans. The devices are only available on new cars and can't be retrofitted to older models.

Ford began offering the fire-suppression system in its 2005 police cars after agreeing with an Arizona task force recommendation in 2002.

The task force, a blue-ribbon panel led by then-Attorney General Janet Napolitano, was made up of police officials, safety engineers and Ford representatives who studied how to make the big Ford sedans less likely to catch fire after being struck in the rear.

DPS Maj. Deston Coleman said Ford agreed to supply the agency with the first Police Interceptors with the fire-suppression system because of Arizona's leading role in the task force.

DPS has ordered 100 new Crown Victorias, all equipped with fire suppression, which will replace about 9 percent of the department's fleet.
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 12:39:39 PM EDT
Finally.

Things like what happened to Ofc Jason Schecterle are unexcuseable.

Taken from his site:


Link Posted: 9/16/2005 2:00:17 PM EDT
As a former mechanical engineer, I did off-road race trucks for a stint, I have to ask; What level of 'safety' is enough? Should our patrol cars be designed differently than a civilian counterpart due to the particular uses our cars see - ie traffic stops on the side of the freeway? Probably. To what level of protection and thus cost do the mfg's design a piece of police equipment?

I"m not down playing the tragedies that have occured. I'm asking a legitimate design question.

Brian
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 3:43:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By brian4wd:
As a former mechanical engineer, I did off-road race trucks for a stint, I have to ask; What level of 'safety' is enough?



When you look at the cost to recruit, train, and equip a police officer, plus the cost of even a small workers comp claim (or death benifit) $2,500.00 more per vehicle is chump change.
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 9:46:58 PM EDT
Amen, I've seen them waste more than that on a whim. Would love to see it as standard equipment but, that ain't gonna happen. Making it standard equip would be like admitting that there was a problem.
Link Posted: 9/17/2005 7:00:59 AM EDT
$35000 for a vehicle!!!!!

That's a lot of money! I think we pay right at $20000 for CVPI.
Link Posted: 9/17/2005 7:21:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
$35000 for a vehicle!!!!!

That's a lot of money! I think we pay right at $20000 for CVPI.



I think they are referring to the total budget to outfit it for patrol.
Link Posted: 9/17/2005 8:03:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By npd233:

Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
$35000 for a vehicle!!!!!

That's a lot of money! I think we pay right at $20000 for CVPI.



I think they are referring to the total budget to outfit it for patrol.



Yeah, tack on all the emergency equipment, the cage, the weapon mounts, etc.

I don't see how anyone can blame ford for not making a car rated for 70+ MPH rear impacts. Hell, mercedes, bmw, lexus, volvo. none are safety rated to that speed. there's just too many variables.
Link Posted: 9/17/2005 10:20:48 AM EDT
I, too, mourn the loss of even one LEO, for whatever reason. But, just for a moment, put this problem in perspective. Ford Crown Vic's have been in use as Police Patrol Vehicles for many years...probably all the way back to 1970 or 1971 with the old LTD models. Out of these many thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands of Police vehicles, there have also been many thousands of crashes...perhaps many tens of thousands, or more. Fifteen police officers have lost their lives, and others have been horribly maimed by rear-end collisions that resulted in explosion and fire. The percentages are very, very small. And the speeds of the impacting vehicles have been great. Almost always in excess of 60-65 mph, to cause the fire hazard. IMHO, its not the vehicle....its the dumbass so-called drivers, most of whom were DWI, half-asleep, talking on a cell phone, or otherwise allowed themselves to be distracted...then slammed into a marked police vehicle, usually with all emergency lights activated, and the collision was usually in excess of the posted speed limits. I doubt seriously any other manufacturer's product would perform any better, under similar circumstances. That said...I'm perfectly willing to say, its a good thing to add the new safety equipment. Betcha very few jurisdictions will, because of cost. Sad... Just my $.02. Not trying to get an argument going...just my opinion. And I know all about those...Everyone's got one (just like assholes)...most stink....mine included. Out.
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